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The Faversham Creek Railway - Members Personal Layouts. - Model Railway Layouts. - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Fri Sep 27th, 2019 08:40 pm
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Sol wrote: Yes, I was wondering why you have been absent. Has Mabel trained you yet?

And  by doing changes to the layout, it means Him Upstairs can't take you until the layout is finished , well that is my reasoning why the D&S gets regular changes !!!


I think she had us trained within a week Sol.  She is a very bright little girl and has responded to her own training exceedingly well.  I am thinking of training her as a working dog, she picks things up so quickly.... but that is a way off yet. A friend's father organises shoots for the rich and famous and he is always after working dogs, especially spaniels, and as Mabel's parents were both working dogs I think it might be in her genes.  She already seeks and retrieves beautifully....so long as there is a treat!

Thankfully the operation was only minor, in the sense that it wasn't life threatening, so I'm hoping Him upstairs isn't looking my way for some time... but if layout changes keep him at bay I think I might be going on forever!!

Regards

Michael



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 Posted: Fri Sep 27th, 2019 08:43 pm
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It was my birthday earlier this month and the children clubbed together to buy vouchers for the local model shop.  Time to go spend them, I think, but what to buy??  Any thoughts?
Michael



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 Posted: Thu Oct 3rd, 2019 07:38 pm
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Hi Chris     Bravo, an excellent achievement, and from bits lying around. Well done indeed. Mind you if I didn’t dump stuff occasionally I wouldn’t be able to move. More trip hazards than enough. Best wishes Kevin 



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 Posted: Thu Oct 3rd, 2019 10:48 pm
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I think you posted in the wrong place Kevin!



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 Posted: Fri Oct 4th, 2019 08:18 am
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Hi Michael. Thank you for your reply. No I didn’t, but silly me I put in the incorrect name. It should have read.    Hi Michael and the achievement was “ Building an excellent Yard Crane “ from bits lying around. “ Whilst here my recent purchase from Hattons was “ Sleeper built buffer stops “ , be aware I don’t like the plastic that Peco used for the buffer stops, but, I did manage to build one. I have lost the run of the others which are probably in a 
Really Useful Storage Box or have been dumped in error.   Best wishes Kevin 



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 Posted: Tue Oct 29th, 2019 12:24 am
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Well, I've been busy trying to rework some track and lay the next section, with varying degrees of success.  Having greatly altered my original track plan, I'm now sort of making it up as I go along which might not be a great idea!
But at the same time I have been practising different techniques for making trees.  I've shown a few I have made in the past, but two things trouble me:

1.  To scale, they are actually quite small.  In my head they are mature trees, but actually they are only about 8cm tall, so not really mature at all.  I read a few articles about how we tend to model trees too small and that they should have some real height.  So I set about making something at a larger scale.  I tried to make wire frame trees, but they still come out too short and, if I'm honest, not that convincing.  That is my fault, not the technique.  I can't seem to get it to look like a real tree.

Then when walking the new puppy, I came across some dying weeds.... so I took some cuttings and brought them home and got out some seafoam trees.....





I used the weeds to create a tree armature using wire to tie things together and then I covered it all with PVA and sawdust....







Then I cut off "branches" from the seafoam and superglued them to this structure.  I am quite pleased with the outcome.  Next I will have to add some sort of leaves, after I have sprayed the tree and finished the trunk off.  But so far it looks like this....






This tree is 24cm tall, which is 60 scale feet, so much more like a mature tree.

Regards

Michael



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 Posted: Tue Oct 29th, 2019 01:44 am
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For something more spreading like an oak or elm I've found the old wood of English lavender plants to be very effective for the framework and you end up with realistic scaling on the trunk.

This was an early effort of mine from 3 years ago. Extra main leaders grafted in to thicken up and balance the canopy. At 24cm when the foliage was added  this comes in at 18m with a trunk around 1m diameter at its base.

If I was redoing this I'd now have strong laterals to fill out the lower width of the canopy

Colin






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 Posted: Tue Oct 29th, 2019 08:36 am
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Looks great Colin!



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 Posted: Tue Oct 29th, 2019 08:11 pm
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That twig/sea foam tree is coming in great to me. I need to get my hands on some sea foam too.
Scale/realistic things sometimes can be confusing to me too, as you said a 8-10cm tree seems large but it’s quite small! The trees at the back of my garden are easily twice the height of of house and they aren’t that tall! But to model that, feels excessive! I find this with lampposts etc as well!



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 Posted: Thu Oct 31st, 2019 06:04 pm
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Tree looks really good Michael using the weed mixed with the seamoss has enabled you to make a really great looking tree


Brian



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 Posted: Fri Nov 1st, 2019 10:25 pm
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Thanks for the comments folks.  Trees are becoming a bit of an obsession!  But if I think about the amount of time I put into track laying and model building, I guess the time on trees is comparable, and as they can play such an important part in a scene, I hope it is time well spent.
Michael



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 Posted: Sat Nov 2nd, 2019 09:30 pm
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How in heaven's name have I missed this thread Michael ..............?  I've just read all 28 pages of it.

There is some stunning modelling here - yet another thread I'll be following closely from now on.

I love your ideas - regarding the inclusion of various characters from books, I'm really looking forward to when you attempt Gibbon's "Decline and Fall ........................" - that will prove interesting in the extreme !!

I was also impressed by your use of the Linka mouldings - I also have several sets of their moulds left over from an earlier life.  A friend of mine, a very good modeller indeed, made a Linka model of Jervaulx Abbey which, having been presented to the site, now resides in their tea rooms.  I'm currently in UK with an old laptop but, when I return to France, I'll access the photos of it and post one on here - it's a very impressive build.

Whenever I use Linka, I still cast in plaster which, as you say, is quite delicate.  Does the resin harm the moulds at all ?



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 Posted: Sun Nov 3rd, 2019 12:07 am
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Hi Peter and welcome to my humble offerings.  I have mentioned a few times that it was modellers here who inspired me to get started on a layout, and you are one of those, so you are partly responsible for the thread!
I really like Linka, but I have found it a bit of a beast to work with! I use a wax releasing agent which I brush into the moulds and let dry, before using resin.  So far, castings are great and no damage to the moulds at all.  I also make my own moulds from latex, usually a Linka structure I want to repeat.... and it works a treat.  Make the Linka structure, use it to make a latex mould.... away you go!

Linka is HO , and it can show with other OO buildings.  It works great for background buildings or larger ones, like my hotel.  

I know the Abbey you mention.  It is a constant inspiration to me and I am impressed that you know the maker.  If you get the chance, tell him that it has been such an inspiration, even though i know I will never match it.  If I remember correctly it was Linka with other plastic products, which is what led me to use a plastic roof on the hotel, rather than Linka moulds which are too thick, in my opinion.

I fear I sometimes waffle on in my posts, or take loads of photos of the same thing, but I am recording the slow progress of Faversham, I hope it is not too boring.

I've had a think about The Decline and Fall...... now that is a challenge I might just accept!!  I've also opened it up to movies, not because of the lack of literature, but because I want to include a film or two/

Warm regards

Michael



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 Posted: Sun Nov 3rd, 2019 11:45 am
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That tree makes really nice 'Autumn' tree just as it is, Michael. :thumbs

Douglas



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 Posted: Sun Nov 3rd, 2019 11:55 am
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Sorry, forgot to add piccy of Peco's latest bufferstop from the bullhead range.Pretty sure it will 'clip' over Code 75. A lot less toy like than some. My attempts at a white metal kit resulted in a grey metallic puddle....



Douglas



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 Posted: Sun Nov 3rd, 2019 06:04 pm
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Nice looking buffer stop Doug - pity it's bullhead rail ......................

I went to a small exhibition with the Linka abbey builder (Derek Shaw) today Michael - he asked me to thank you for your kind comments.

You are right in that the abbey roof is plasticard, as are some of the other detail bits.  The main walls are backed with balsa supports because the Linka plaster isn't tough enough for such large expanses of stonework.  Including research, it took him around 4 years to build but he only had 1 set of moulds !  He'd just retired and needed something to occupy his time !!!!

Although not in the very best of health, in addition to a wonderful N Gauge layout, he now churns out fantastic card models ............................ I wish !



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 Posted: Sun Nov 3rd, 2019 06:21 pm
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I am pretty certain they will fit code 75, I have need of two more and I've never been known to throw away SLW tokens willy-nilly. After all, I was the man who spent a fortnight in Monte  Carlo and afterwards lamented "Jing's! There went saxpence......'
Douglas



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 Posted: Sun Nov 3rd, 2019 07:39 pm
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Yes, nice buffer Doug, and well remembered (if indeed you did) that I am on the lookout!
Peter, fancy meeting with Derek just after you mentioned him.  4 years to make I can well believe!  But what a modelling legacy. I can't believe he did it with one set of moulds, and casting in plaster.  Now I'm even more in awe!

Regards

Michael




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 Posted: Sat Nov 9th, 2019 01:48 am
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My wife and I were at a dinner party tonight.  The host knew I was new to railway modelling, that her husband would love to have a model railway and a third guest was a professional model maker.  Cue very exciting/boring conversations at one end of the table, depending on your point of view!
Now, guest 3 (I feel I shouldn't name him as it transpired that he has worked on some significant projects and I didn't actually discuss writing about our conversation on this forum....) is a freelance architectural modeller, who has worked around the world on some very exciting projects - why didn't my careers teacher tell me about this??

He works in some odd scales (1/100 is apparently quite popular for simple projects), but for big presentations he might be working at 1/32 or 1/16.  His models are used to win bids usually, so he has to create the scene from the architect's plans and the existing environment.  And as it is in order to win a bid, he tries to convey it as realistically as possible. All very interesting.....

So, I mentioned that I am currently really struggling with trees!  They look OK too small for the scale, and too big at the correct scale.  And I mentioned that I generally struggle with the whole scale thing.   

He explained that when he is creating a model scene, he goes through a number of procedures, which  I will share with any readers.......

1. The focus of his model is made to scale
2.  All other features are not made to the same scale.  He will vary them depending on what he wants to emphasise or diminish.  we are not talking huge variances, but enough to send rivet counters to a nuclear bunker!  So, if he wants to emphasise open space, he might use smaller scale "people" and scenics.  But if he wants a design to fit into the landscape, he will do the opposite - reduce the scale of the building slightly or increase the scale of things around it.  
3.  He said some things have to be scaled down in order to look right, whatever you are doing. For example, colour doesn't scale well.  If you try to create the same colour in the real world in a scale model it often looks wrong.  He uses a technique of taking a photograph of an area and then using photoshop to tone colours down as a reference when he is working.  He gave an example of high viz jackets.  He said if you replicated that bright yellow in scale, it would just dominate a scene and look most unrealistic.  He actually uses a very "dull" yellow to give the impression.  The eye seems to see it and translates it to real life.  I thought might be interesting when we are weathering things.....
4. He said that generally, the human brain is not that good at seeing detail.  It generally takes in a whole scene and processes many things together.  The problem is that when we come to model it, we focus on all of the detail, which is why it often doesn't look right.  He likened it to making a movie.  The camera sees all of the detail, but the director, cinematographer and editor will work together to minimise and maximise what the viewer sees  The skill in creating a model scene is to detail those parts you want to be noticed and just give an impression of some other parts.  Detailing everything is good if people study a scene and take it all in, but it won't look like a coherent and realistic scene because that is not how we see the world around us.

He showed me a couple of photos of things he is working on..... I think I might as well give up model making and have a go at cross-stitch!!

Michael




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 Posted: Sat Nov 9th, 2019 06:51 am
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Now that's what I call a dinner guest! Fantastic way of decribing things and as with most of these sort of things, quite obvious, when it is explained so well. Personally I am somewhat challenged in the colours department anyway and have to get the boss involved to check - I know they say the blue grass of Kentucky but pretty sure that didn't apply around the east coast main line and wasn't bright blue.

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