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The Faversham Creek Railway - Members Personal Layouts. - Model Railway Layouts. - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Thu Apr 11th, 2019 07:21 am
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Ed
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Headmaster wrote:


 

That looks absolutely bl@@dy wonderful, how do I book a room :thumbs :thumbs :thumbs


Ed



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 Posted: Thu Apr 11th, 2019 07:34 am
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Headmaster
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Thank you very much Ed
Michael



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Faversham Creek

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 Posted: Thu Apr 11th, 2019 11:23 am
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Planning begins for the small goods yard.  I am just using some old card models to give me an idea of size - these are not the finished pieces! (Although the linka warehouse and Wills goods shed will feature here).  I will use the precise location of buildings to locate the uncoupling points.  

I am quite fortunate that I only have one vertical beam in layout area of the loft, and this is it.  Any thoughts on how I might disguise it?  I had thought of perhaps designing a building around, it using a photograph of one.  Not sure if that will work.  I may experiment with giving the upper part a sky colour - although that may look odd!

It's probably something I will just have to live with - but there may be a clever idea out there.....







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Faversham Creek

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 Posted: Thu Apr 11th, 2019 11:54 am
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Barry Miltenburg
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Hi Michael

You could just saw the wooden post off..........

On the other hand, here is a pic of my shed support (not stuck out in the middle I admit) but masked by a simple wall/bothy with a lamp-post, poster and tree to draw the eye away.  The top is painted sky colour  so your suggestion is a good one.


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 Posted: Thu Apr 11th, 2019 11:54 am
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Campaman
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Scalescenes have recently announced some small trawlers, you could either build as they come or use them as templates to scratchbuild.

The Hotel scene is looking great, keep it coming.



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 Posted: Thu Apr 11th, 2019 12:44 pm
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Ed
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Try a building round the vertical beam Michael, it should work as it attracts the eye to the building and not the beam

I had a similar problem with a gas pipe in the garage on my old layout which I put a chimney round, but unfortunately I couldn't really paint the rest of the pipe due to gas regulations.




Ed



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 Posted: Thu Apr 11th, 2019 02:44 pm
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Headmaster
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Thanks folks.

 I did consider a saw...….but I had visions of the layout ending up in the bedroom - as the roof collapsed.  

The chimney looks great around the pipe and it certainly takes your eye away from it, and I like the simple wall idea too.  Perhaps there is some mileage in building something around it after all.  I will have to think of something suitable and see if I can at least reduce the impact of it.




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Faversham Creek

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 Posted: Thu Apr 11th, 2019 03:29 pm
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Longchap
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Possibly stick mirror tile around it by way of camouflage?



Bill



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At 6'4'', Bill is a tall chap, then again, when horizontal he is rather long and people often used to trip over him! . . . and so a nickname was born :)

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 Posted: Thu Apr 11th, 2019 04:18 pm
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Headmaster
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Now I was only reading something about  the use of mirrors the other day! That may work too.  Particularly higher up....

I knew I only had to ask here!

Michael



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Faversham Creek

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 Posted: Thu Apr 11th, 2019 05:23 pm
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John Dew
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Hi Michael

A bit late I am afraid. First off I would paint it out, either white or to tone with the sky colours in the back scene......probably the latter. That will give you a better idea of the best way to conceal the base. I am inclined to think of a building to complement the rather nice warehouse you made. The building (and extension?) to wrap around the post and extend beyond it.

Some suggestions for the yard in keeping with the concept of once busy but now a backwater.

Yard crane......or perhaps just the base

Weigh bridge and building........state of repair your choice

Stable block converted to garages or stores

Foundation only of a former building suggesting past glory

Loading gauge

Point levers and guards

Some of the secondary paths/roads/loading areas rather than having setts might be laid with compacted cinders and ash.........very common feature up to and including the sixties

The railway property would have been fenced off although it may be in a state of disrepair now.......you need to determine who owns or owned the road between the hotel and yard.

There would still be a number of cast iron legal signs regarding right of way, trespass, safety etc........some of these would be triplicated!   Pre grouping Company,  Southern Rly  British Railways.*

* Slight digression.... there was cinder path alongside the Liverpool-Southport line that lead to my Uncle's house
I remember even in the sixties you could trace the history of the line by the array of signs warning one about trespass :
Liverpool-Southport Rly   Lancashire and Yorkshire   London and North Western    LMS     British Rail

Probably lasted as long as the path did!

You have probably already thought of most of these but I thought I would scribble them out just in case any struck a chord

Cheers

John






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 Posted: Thu Apr 11th, 2019 07:12 pm
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Headmaster
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Thanks John - plenty to think about there - some I had considered, but mostly not.  I will have to see what I can fit in across the scene.

Michael



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Faversham Creek

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 Posted: Thu Apr 11th, 2019 07:29 pm
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Briperran
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You can tell its school holidays massive production at Faversham creek.

Hotel really looking the biz now Michael 

RE the support post i have a similar problem wouldnt suggest sawing it the roof may begin to sag .

I am planning to make a building 4/5 storey looking like warehouse sort of thing around it then sky above not ideal but i dont think there is an easy answer.

Brian



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 Posted: Thu Apr 11th, 2019 09:48 pm
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Headmaster
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Hi Brian - yes, yet another holiday for us "lucky teachers".  Although I've been into school everyday this week because we are doing the budget (don't get me started on that...!) And next week I'm going away with pupils, so no work on the railway..... I do an annual trip, either at Easter or in the summer.  We are off to Russia for a week - which is a trip I have done before.  A really interesting country, full of surprises.  St Petersburg is one of the most beautiful cities I have ever visited and full of history.  Next year is a summer trip to Ecuador and the Galapagos  Islands..... and yes, I have to pay! 

I saw that you also had some beams to contend with, so will be interested in how you go about it.  I am going to try a range of things, from the least destructive up.  I will see what mirrors do..... then I will try different paints.  I'm definitely going to create a building.  As my beam is vertical, not at an angle, I will make a flat roof structure and then experiment above it.

My brother, who is an engineer, told me I could move the beam, as it is only nailed into position and so is not load bearing...… but then recanted that after doing a bit of research, given the age of the house.  I could move it, but only to another awkward part of the layout - and as it would be where the Creek is, I would have no chance of hiding it.   So I will keep things as they are and see what I can do.  Strangely it has only become a problem now that I am working on that area.... I hadn't really noticed it before.  If it is the only scenic compromise I have to make, I suppose I can live with it.  I've tried wrapping an old card building around it and, as others have said, your eye is drawn to the building and the scene rather than then the beam, so your big warehouse will probably work a treat.  People have suggested going with a light colour, which I will try..... but my instinct is to go with black in an effort to "lose" it.  That will be my last attempt if all else fails.

I know it's the school holidays when my wife and I go out midweek! (She is a headmistress - our poor children!)

Regards

Michael




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Faversham Creek

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 Posted: Thu Apr 11th, 2019 10:05 pm
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Longchap
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Headmaster wrote:
As my beam is vertical, not at an angle


So that will be a column Michael, while a beam is a horizontal structural member, often used to support roofs or intermeadiate floors. Inclined members can be braces, struts or bearers and sometimes even beams if at less than 45 degrees, above that, I'll call them inclined columns, but rafters if in a roof construction, although generally columns are always vertical, so to best transfer loads more efficiently.

Oh the joys of building construction. I also enjoyed structural mechanics at college, although that was some 35 years ago now! Time certainly flies.

Cheers,

Bill



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At 6'4'', Bill is a tall chap, then again, when horizontal he is rather long and people often used to trip over him! . . . and so a nickname was born :)

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 Posted: Thu Apr 11th, 2019 10:14 pm
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Headmaster
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Mea Culpa!  Not a beam! Whatever.... it's in the way!!!  My brother tells me it isn't load bearing, but because it is keeping the shape.  My background is philosophy, so I will take his word for it! (He was probably making it easy for me!)

Thank you, I have learned something new...

Regards

Michael




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Faversham Creek

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 Posted: Thu Apr 11th, 2019 10:27 pm
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Longchap
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I'm learning something new all the time and if not, I must be getting lazy or relaxing too much!

This next week, I hope to be mainly practising with my new airbrush.

Have fun with that wonderfully developing layout.

Best,

Bill



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At 6'4'', Bill is a tall chap, then again, when horizontal he is rather long and people often used to trip over him! . . . and so a nickname was born :)

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 Posted: Fri Apr 12th, 2019 12:20 am
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Headmaster
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Me too Bill, I learn something new all the time when I go through this forum.  Things which I wasn't ready for once become inspiration now.  I value everyone's input here because it is always done with such good grace and knowledge.  

I too have a new airbrush!  I'm a bit afraid to try it out, so I will be interested to see your work.  Is it a new airbrush, or are you new airbrushing?  I am a complete novice, so any tips you have will be gratefully received.

Regards

Michael



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 Posted: Fri Apr 12th, 2019 08:11 am
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Longchap
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Hi Michael,

In reality, I'm new to airbrushing, but not to spray painting and my approach is a simple logical one, but helped by a splendid course I attended in February on this very subject. See post 10 on this thread:

http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=15841&forum_id=21

I first used an airbrush 35 years ago on model car kits, an inexpensive Humbrol siphon bottle fed unit which I still have, served by a can of propellant. They are still available, but not ideal for serious finishes and subtle weathering.

I'll post something further on the above thread when I've cleared by work bench and set up the spray station and attended to some stock next week.

There are lots of YouTube videos on airbrushing, a multitude in fact and even some good ones amoung them. It's a simple and straightforward enough technique, but requires very strict attention to the basic principles to avoid a lot of clean-up to equipment and workpiece, but the results are most rewarding.

I think you will enjoy your airbrush with your well researched approach to modelling.

Right, back to laying a cement and sand screed in a storage outbuilding.

Bon weekend,

Bill



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At 6'4'', Bill is a tall chap, then again, when horizontal he is rather long and people often used to trip over him! . . . and so a nickname was born :)

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 Posted: Fri Apr 12th, 2019 04:55 pm
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Briperran
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Michael

In all probability its a purling support as its either slightly angled or  vertical that is what mine are.

You probably could remove it but you may find over a period of time the roof wood begin to sag.

It could be replaced with a steel bar or even a scaffold pole that would do the same job but obviously smaller.

I suppose technically it is not load bearing as the purling itself takes the load but that support ensures that the purling does not warp over a period of time.


Brian



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 Posted: Fri Apr 12th, 2019 06:39 pm
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Headmaster
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I'm not risking removal.... I've lived with it this long, I can work around it.  I definitely don't want anything sagging  :mutley

Michael



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