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Barry Miltenburg
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Yarslow is a 4mm scale BR(E) layout set in the 1960's.  Locomotives and rolling stock from the usual suppliers with a few coach and wagon kits.  Track is Peco code 75 with analogue cab control.  Control is through 3 Gaugemaster feedback units.  Signals are Ratio static models - better static than nothing!!  The layout has taken 5 years to build including long periods of inactivity caused by other obligations.  Videos posted on the Yarslow YouTube channel including details of the cartridge storage system, operational aspects of the stopping freight trains and attempts to make my layout different to everyone elses.



Early days with baseboards under construction.  The 12 x 8 shed is fully insulated.  Daylight flourescent tubes and a dedicated ring main electric circuit is fully RCD protected - as an electrician I am fully aware of the needs for safety!!



Peco point motors are driven via a CDU and have added switches to feed the live frogs as required.  Modifying the plain points is easy and luckily, the single slip is already factory ready!!  Its amazing how much wire you get through on even the simplest layout - analogue of course.



Ballast, scenery and signals starting appear.



Signal box diagram.  Double track line runs around the shed with each cutting off to a cartridge for train storage.  Separate loco and train cartridges provide for maximum variations.  Trains are 6 coaches or 20 wagons/Brake van maximum but on a layout this sze, that looks OK.  On the diagram, the lay-by at the top curves around to follow the main lline and the short siding leads to a factory.  Bottom left is the branch to Highmarsh.  In essence, this a double track version of Edington Junction on the S&DJR.

Below - various views of the layout showing that there are still jobs to do.




Last edited on Sun May 14th, 2017 09:13 pm by Barry Miltenburg

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Lovely layout! I'm off to look at your Youtube channel with interest.

Ed
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Great looking layout Barry, and what a tidy shed :thumbs

Like Peter, I'm off to watch your videos.



Ed

Barry Miltenburg
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Thanks Peter

I try to keep the "tidy" thing quiet in case the wife thinks that I could transfer those skills to the house...........

Barry Miltenburg
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Just realised that Yarslow features on Picture Of The Week.

I am genuinely touched by that - many thanks  Alan     :doublethumb

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I'm impressed Barry!!!!  Now if you could hide the tidiness thing from your wife to avoid the domestic stuff and give a me a hand to tidy mine in the interests of model railways, 10,000 miles not withstanding!!!!

Well done mate!

Cheers from Oz

Trevor

Barry Miltenburg
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Spurred on by the Mod's kindness, here are some trains - just to prove that I have some.  Note that I have not got round to weathering anything yet - it's another job on the list!!  The cartridge train storage system allows me to have a choice from some 40-odd trains to run on the layout.



Class 25 with a mineral train.  Most of these photos were taken before loco headcodes and crew were fitted although wagons have loads and coaches have passengers.  This was the first loco bought for the layout and is a firm favourite.



The wonderful Q6 0-8-0 which could probably pull the shed over if required.



The 36 inch radius curve through the platform does not look too bad, especially when viewed from low level.  The office chair seen in the photos above brings eye-height to about 4 inches above the baseboard top when operating.  Yarslow sits on a secondary main line so there are no A4's or similar - they would not have come this way so I stick to lesser engines to create a more realistic scene.



The layout is meant to be in NE Region so a K3 on a fish train was an obvious choice.  The Metcalf station building is due for replacement.



I have two of these B17's for the Inter District trains.  The Gresley  coach behind the tender is a strengthener and is an Ian Kirk "all 3rd" kit.  It's a pity these are hard to find now as they make up really nicely.  Anyone with an articulated set they don't want would be an instant friend!!



Standard 3MT 2-6-2T with an ordinary passenger train.  The first vehicle is a Mk I BG.  The signal behind the engine protects the exit from the lay-bye and the tracks in the foreground are the yard sidings.



Hornby's D16 has poor pulling power so it makes a great choice for the Inspection saloon.  The coach is a mod from a Hornby clerestory with bay windows cut and full interior.  There is reference to this vehicle in the YouTube video about making layouts different.



More Hornby clerestories painted to look like old vehicles that represent a special working for the local boys boarding school.  All trains running on the layout are copies (or based on) trains seen in photos.  Books like the LNER Passenger Trains tome by Steve Banks is a must if you want to get this stuff right.  Works by Bob Essery are also very good - they talk about real railways, not what other people model.  The D49 is as old as the coaches.



The branch runs from about where the brake van is to the overbridge - probably the shortest branch line in the known modelling World!!!  However, it gives a reason to the freight operations - see YouTube again for the video on how I run my stopping freight trains.  The J72 is the regular branch engine.  The brake vans sit at the end of the lay-bye for reasons that escape me now!

I'll post some more later.  For more, you could go to the Yarslow YouTube channel for moving pictures - the wonders of technology!!



Spurno
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Barry Miltenburg wrote: Just realised that Yarslow features on Picture Of The Week.

I am genuinely touched by that - many thanks  Alan     :doublethumb

You're welcome Barry plus you've now given me some nice puzzle pics.

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Welcome to the club Barry, and what a marvellous layout, some great photos, definitely deserves Picture Of The Week.  :doublethumb

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Hi Barry.  Purrfect! Every time I see such a well built layout, I think that someone is using postcards instead of photos.Seeing your " Cut and Shut" inspection  coach, reminds me, if you've got a minute sometime? I will have to send you a PM on my "Tri-ang Clerestory Coach project" as it looks like I have bitten off more than I can chew.
       All the best. Kevin

Barry Miltenburg
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Kevin

Happy to chip in if I can.  I might need some help on PM's as I not familiar with that method of communication.

Barry

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Hi Barry.  Thank you for your reply. I have just had a look at your YouTube channel. very interesting. As it happens I am a Southern fan, I read about Terry Goughs article on buying old Tri-ang Clerestory coaches and converting them to LSWR coaches, but I have been told that the end result is not " very convincing ".all the same, now I have them I would like to utilise them.  All the best. Kevin   PS I will probably be shot at dawn, charged with "thread hijacking". Because the PM message is sent to a member by going to a members details and clicking on PM, and you get a new page, then fire/ write away.

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Barry that is a very nice layout with plenty going I to are off to view the YouTube channel. :thumbs

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Hi Alan.   Puzzle Pics?? That's a new one on me. Please tell me, where do I find details??  All the best. Kevin

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No details really Kevin.Any photo posted can be used for the weekly puzzle.

Barry Miltenburg
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Having a bit of spare time I thought I would share some more Yarslow pictures with you.  I draw great inspiration from other people's layout pictures and hope this pays a bit back.

All of my pictures are examined for outstanding jobs - the roadway in the first picture doesn't meet the wall for example!!  Similarly, the shot through the road overbridge reveals that it appears to be flying.

By the same token, it can be pleasing to confirm that a particular scene works - the view across the yard is similar to the one I get from my operators chair whilst a bit of weathering and a crew do a lot for that ancient Hornby J52.  The weathering and passengers in the Gresley coach bring it to life and careful choices of real trains (from Steve Banks' books) brings a B12 with a pigeon working.  The leading vehicle is another Ian Kirk kit. 

I didn't realise how poor the original Hornby B12 was until the new version arrived - what a difference nearly 50 years makes!  I had an old B12 on my train set when I was 10 - you remember the one with the "chuff-chuff" noise made by a bit of metal strip rubbing on an abrasive pad under the tender.  Kids today don't know they're born..................

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Thanks, Barry.  I am enjoying the photos of your excellent layout.

Thanks for posting them.  :thumbs

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Hi Barry,

Nice set up. Lots of detail in there. Keep up the good work.
I too will have a look at your Utube videos as I am curious about your cartridge storage system.

Gary

Last edited on Sun Jun 18th, 2017 01:46 am by thespanishdriver

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Very good looking layout Barry.  I'm trying to do a representation of an ER branchline terminus with my 7mm layout.

John

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Some excellent video's Barry. Your cartridge system has given me some inspiration as I too have storage issues.

Keep up the good work.

Gary

Barry Miltenburg
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Hi John/Brossard

Is your layout posted on YMRC?  Be good to see some pics

Barry

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Good afternoon from a sunny London.  A few more pics showing latest developments - alas they have been thin for a number of reasons, mostly linked to starting a new portable/exhibition layout, the Women's UEFA Euros in the Netherlands and a whole bundle of usual domestic "stuff" - I probably don't need to elaborate do I??



We all know that this is a Ratio GWR 4-wheeled brake coach but in this guise, it will work very well as an engineers coach on my PW train.  An interior, windows and some decals will finish it off.  In my YT video "Making it Different" I mention that the vast majority of people looking at my layout would not know the difference between a PW coach and a Jumbo jet.  That coupled with the Peter Denny approach of "If it looks right, it is right", I'm happy.....



I took the plunge recently and bought a couple of Skaledale buildings as they are based on NER prototypes and I thought they would look better than the Airfix/Ratio (GWR) examples I had.  I was right although the goods shed needed to have the resin doors cut out to allow the tracks to run through.  Naughty of Hornby really.  I have a multi-speed Dremel and a load of discs/tools but a young/new modeller would really struggle to make this building work.  The final result still needs some interior paint.  Surely there is better "play" value in this building if it is modelled with the ability to run wagons onto it.  Hornby - consider yourselves scolded.



The signal box is nice but needs weathering to lose that shiny finish.  I have a Springside interior kit to add.  The old Airfix box had an interior with the correct levers for the track plan and I shall do that again.  This box is larger than its predecessor so I had to shorten the blind siding at the end of the lay-bye, paint the ground work under the old track-bed and then re-site the outside loo.  My quick 10-minutes-in-the-shed planting the new signal box took over an hour!!  Happy days.



Finally, a bit more bent history.  In 1962, BR(NE)R used the Yarslow line to trial the Standard 4-6-0 5MT locomotives as possible replacements for the ageing B12, B1 and B17 fleet.  73069 was actually an Aylesbury engine at the time, bought in for the trials.  Seen here approaching Yarslow, she ran the semi-fast diagrams with ease. 

Load of sheep-dip of course - I like the look of these engines and needed an excuse to own one  :lol:

Since taking this photo I have shortened the distance between the loco and tender and removed the front coupling.  The paint is still wet on the eventual crew and I will put an inspector with the footplatemen to add credibility to my historical nonsense.

Last edited on Sat Aug 12th, 2017 05:50 pm by Barry Miltenburg

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It all looks very convincing from here, Barry.  :thumbs

Barry Miltenburg
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Hi guys

I have not posted anything for a while for various totally unconnected reasons so thought that an update was in order. 

I have today posted a video update onto my Yarslow YouTube channel - link below

Winter Update at Yarslow

Enjoy

Barry

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Yet another long gap between posts driven by, amongst other things, a busy schedule that has meant that I have had a lot less time than I wanted in the shed.  Doesn't THAT sound familiar?

Anyway, I set myself the "Wagon Project" task - having populated all of the coaches and staffed all of the locomotives, it was time to add loads to all of the appropriate wagons.  I had a couple of packs of wagon sheets in stock, lumps of polystyrene and some crushed coal, and a few new acquisitions from eBay including crates, boxes etc etc.  The final purchase was a goodly supply of superglue and some fine thread used by model boaty types for rigging.



Here is the result of a coule of hours work - six crates on a Lowfit.  The crates came as laser cut kits- each crate had 8 parts!!!   The rigging string is simply knotted at the end to represent a lashing and then glued to the wagon's fixing ring.  From the obligatory 24 inches, it looks a lot less crude that this.



Here is variation on the same theme - except that I cannot remember for the life of me what these white drums actually are.  They are hard and made from some unknown compacted powder and may well have come out of an old electrical installation I dismantled but whatever they are, they look brilliant as a wagon load.  Ropes as before.



Lots of these done - polystyrene base, shaped into a slight "pile" shape and then covered in PVA and coal lumps.  I think my coal came from old BBQ cinders just crushed up.  I have made about 40 of these for the various trains on the layout.



An eBay purchase - packets of barrels.  A quick paint and then just glued in.  Note that only empty barrels can be carried lying down.  The wagon on the left has a number of timber baulks (balsa) to stop the wagons moving.



This train came about as a result of a bit of a brain teaser.  I have repainted/weathered 4 old Hornby GWR clerestory coaches to represent some older NER coaches of dubious origin (certainly not in the diagram book methinks!!).  Based on a photograph I have, the train represents a special working for the local boys boarding school, carrying the darling children to school at the start of term and home again at the end of term.  My problem was how to represent the train as full one way and empty when returning.  I originally thought that I would put passengers on one side only so that when the coaches were turned around, it would appear that the coaches were empty.  That idea crashed and burned when I realised that the branch on the new layout will face the other way to the junction and therefore a spectator would see both sides of the train during its journey.

The solution turned out to be simple - build two trains and have one full one and one empty one.  In the photo above, the new train is seen on the branch loop of the old layout.  The first (brake) coach is from the original train and the back 4 coaches are from the new train.  I thought that I had painted them all the same colour but when put together, it appears not!!  Never mind.



This close up of the one of the all 3rds (2nds in 1961 I guess) shows that the coaches have had seats added and new glazing.  The repaint has left the door handles the same colour as the body but this will be remedied with a bit of dry-brushed "brass" paint. 

Just out of shot in the first photo is the D49 4-4-0 that will haul the train.  This is one of the Hornby Railroad D49's with chassis drive in place of the old rubbish tender drive.  I already had one of these - 62760 "The Cotswold" but Hornby had not released any other BR black versions.  I bought an old body for 62758 "Cattistock" that had come from an original tender drive locomotive and another 62670 model.  A little bit of fettling later and the old body fitted perfectly onto the new Railroad chassis - voila!!  I still have an old tender drive version "Cheshire" and it's interesting to note the high quality of even the Railroad stuff against what we used to find acceptable.

The big summer project is weathering my 50 locomotives, dozens of coaches and some 400 wagons.  Deep breath, get sitting comfortable, begin..............

Barry Miltenburg
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Bank Holiday weekend in the UK and the sun is shining - make a note people, it doesn't happen very often.

A great time therefore to start the next job - The Weathering Project.

An auspicious start in the week when a Windows 10 update totally wrecked the operating system of my laptop to the extent that it doesn't even know it has a desktop or where any of the files are.  Therefore, I am coming at you from the keyboard of the ancient little laptop that normally only displays my operating sequence for my Yarslow layout.  I didn't realise how slow it was!!!!!!

Anyways, with apologies for the lack of photos (to follow when the laptop is recovered) I thought I would share my experiences of weathering from the standpoint of a total novice.

I am fortunate to have a magazine library that began in 1972 and comprises all of the Railway Modeller and Hornby issues.  They have been carefully indexed on Excel so a quick search revealed a handful of articles that I have read and re-read.  This has taught me how useful those hours spent indexing have been.

I thought that the Badger 200 airbrush I so proudly own and paid (what I thought was) a fortune for would be ideal but it turns out to be a "budget" model and fairly useless for intricate work.  Tim Shackleton (Hornby Mag) recommends the  Iwata Revolution M1 single-action airbrush as the best single-action tool he has used.  Before parting with £100 however, I thought that the Badger deserved a fair trial.

Some years ago, I made the forsighted decision to buy a compressor at a local show.  Not sure who makes it but its marked "AS18 1/6hp".  It has an adjustable pressure valve, clear gauge and a condensation trap built in.  The badger was hooked up and away I went using a paint mix recommended by Mr Shackleton (acrylic Humbrol black 33 and leather 62 thinned down to a milky consistency).  The Badger turned out to be erratic at best, splattering and spluttering at the recommended 32psi.  Cleaning the airbrush, fresh paint mix, new consistency, lower/higher pressure were all tried in the hour spent "weathering" a pile of ancient Triang wagons and some of the kit-built stuff I built 30 years ago.

In a final bid to get any sort of decent result and having run out of Humbrol 62, I went for new pot of Wood (110) which I had previously thinned with acrylic thinners down to a painting consistency.  Clean brush and voila!  I was suddenly cutting grass.  Spraying at about 20psi from about 6-9 inches gave me the ability to give a wagon a gentle all-over weathered effect.  Another pass along the axleboxes and running gear with the wagon upside down gave that area extra tone.  I think I will need to go back with a brake block colour to touch around the underframes but I am happy.

Moral of the story?  Research your subject from people who are paid to do it in magazines etc - other opinions are available but they will give you a starting point.  Get some decent reference photos from the thousands of books that are published.  (Avoid heritage line pictures as their wagons are spangly clean!!)  Have a go irrespective of the equipment you have - I accept that I am using basic equipment but its working for me.  When I come to do locomotives, I may have to shell out for the Iwata but for now, the Badger rocks on.  If at first you don't succeed, try again.  I will post a picture of my first wagon - basically an old MR box van that was grey but now looking like it got caught in the middle of a mud-chucking fight!!!!!  Thomas Edison said that you only fail when you stop trying...........

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Hi Barry    During the dates that you mention I was spending.my money on globetrotting. Don’t mention Windows 10 too much, when I purchased my HP laptop( for cash:mrgreen::mutley) it was using windows 8 , and it worked fine, until that is, I upgraded to W10. Ever since it is  a. PITA.And further to my W10 woes I am depending on my “Hacked ipad “. One day I will , maybe, get sorted out until then I will keep my fingers crossed.trying to extend and improve my own small railway empire.  Best wishes. Kevin

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Hi Barry,

Just caught up with your posts. :oops:   Your work is very inspiring  - lovely detail. :thumbs :thumbs

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Dave - thank you for your comments.

As promised, I now have some pics.  Apologies for the size but I have no photo editing software on this laptop and it only run Windows SE so I am struggling to download anything to use!!



This is the first ever attempt with the compressor banging away at 32psi and the airbrush wide open.  Net result was a mud-pie delivery of paint onto the side of this beautiful MR box van.  It's actually grey under all that gunge.



These are some of the wagons I am practising on - old Ratio and Slaters kits from yonks ago.  The LT&SR Stores wagon shows that the Badger is not really good at picking out rusty elements.  I have improved a bit on this with a few more tries but it really shows itself up here.  It is fine for doing general weathering though.....



These two wagons are identical other than I have given the one on the left a light once-over with my weathering paint.  Today I switched to Revell and found it much better.  This is one of the earthy tones, thinned 1:1 with Humbrol acrylic thinners.  25psi and the nozzle adjusted to produce a very fine mist of paint directed upwards from track level.  The roof is sprayed ALONG its length, not sideways.  When the shininess of the plastic vanishes, it's done.

I learned a few key lessons very quickly here; (1) you cannot rush weathering.  A few passes with a light mist is a millions times better than trying to splat the paint on if you expect it to look anything,  (2) when you think you have done enough, you probably have.  The worst results I got came when I thought that it needed just one more pass, (3) have a box-fresh wagon standing by to refer to.  The weathering is very subtle and its easy to assume that you haven't applied any paint,  (4) don't forget the wheels.  I weathered a dozen bogie bolsters and then found that the wheels looked like gobstoppers - some parts coloured, some parts not.  I had to take all the wheelsets out, spray them and put them all back in!!  (5) you can't airbrush a wagon and then wait 10 minutes before doing the next one.  Its not good for your nozzle, (6)  paint on the rusty bits, brake dust, oil etc BEFORE you weather.  The weathering colour blends it all in  (7)  don't forget to give the factory weathered stock a light dust as well.  The best layouts display a common set of tones and this needs to carry through to the ready weathered stuff.



This is where the day ended - the wagon on the right is box-fresh whilst the one on the left has had a light dust.  When they are assembled in a train, the fresh wagons stick out a mile.

Tomorrow I am going to tackle some 16T steels with rusty bits.  I will let you know how it goes.

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Having now weathered a whole bunch of wagons - some looking good, some I had to strip back and start again - I got to the oil tanks train.  Advice says that you do the base colours first and then weather a dust coat over the top.

A quick look at a few reference photos and I started with a Revell matt black thinned for the trusty Badger with a brushful of rusty red (not very technical, I just added some until it looked a bit "oily" and not just black). 

This was sprayed on, concentrating on the filler cap area on top of the tank with overspill running down the sides.  The reference photos are your best guide.



Again I apologise for the massive photo but I am still on the old laptop.  The two wagons in the foreground as out-of-the-box whilst those behind have had the oil added.  You can see the staining on the buff coloured BP tank.  This is great fun because the reference photos show that the patterns were not at all regular so some wagons have big spills, others only lightly stained.  All have had a dusting of the oily black all over.  At this stage, its OK to get a bit excited about your achievements :)



Here, the wagons have had a second dusting with the Revell 87 weathering tone concentrating on the underframe with an all-over dust to tone down the oil stains.  This may not score top marks on Bunkerbarge's Pendon Course but I am happy with it - I claim Rule 2 (the 24inch viewing rule) and Rule 1  :lol:



Back to one-colour weathering with the Fish train.  The improvement in the blue wagons was quite remarkable, going from looking fairly toy-like to work-worn with a few passes of the Badger.  Don't forget to give the weathering a quick burst down between the containers.  A good test of your aiming skills!!



A wider shot of the train showing the BR white insulated vans with the recessed doors - apparently they were notorious for gathering filth in the door recesses so I have tightened the spray nozzle right down and given this area a bit of special treatment before opening up for a general dusting across the whole of the wagon.  They actually look whiter in this picture than they do in real life.  Note that on the Conflat A to the left of the white van, the blue insul container is dirtier at the bottom than the top - achieved by spraying upwards from the bottom of the wagon at an angle to represent the dirt being thrown up from below.  Its actually easier to do than describe!!

Back in the day, the Railway Modeller had the tag line "For The Average Modeller" and I would put myself firmly in this category.  There are layouts that are a lot better than mine built by people with more skill than I have and there are layouts at the other end of the spectrum.  I'm happy with that.  I am more happy with the fact that 2 weeks ago I had never airbrushed anything of any note and now I am getting satisfactory results across the wagon fleet.

Its amazing what you can achieve if you read up first, look at the real thing and then have a go.  If I can do it, anyone can.

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Well done Barry.
Lovely layout & some very nicely weathered stock as well.
Love those tankers.


Tony.

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Thank you Tony - hope that I can insprire those who think they can't do this when they probably can.

I have spoken a lot about reference photos so thought it would be useful to share at least one good source - see below.



This sort of book is invaluable, chiefly because its in colour.  Beware the effects of 1960's film and the effect it has on colours but its a brilliant start point.


Back to two-colour weathering today with a straight copy of wagons illustrated in the above book.  Pg 59 shows cement wagons and how they had a coating of powder on the top and over the sides.  This effect was achieved with a very light grey Humbrol 127 lightened with a bit of white.  Spray from the top - a bit like the oil tankers but the whole roof is virtually grey.  Spraying from the top gives you that effect of powder spilling over the sides.  Once the grey was dry, I came back in with my trusty Badger and the Revell 87 earth weathering colour to tone it down.  I didn't apply this earth colour to the top so that the light grey remained dominant.

I am left with my 3 coal trains to do (about 60 wagons) so hopefully I can get a couple of sessions in the shed this week to do (a) the black/rust base coats and (b) the weathering over the top.  That leaves me a handful of wagons that need work (I found YET another Conflat A with a container load that needs chains despite my checking and double-checking last time :???: :???: ) or where I haven't finished the lettering/numbering etc.  I will then move on to the coaching stock - after a bit of research and practice of course!!

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Hurrah!

Today I managed to finish those coal wagons that are ready to be done.  I took delivery of a couple of sets of Modelmaster wagon transfer sheets that allowed me to renumber the ex-PO wagons.  I have just ordered some 16T sheets for half a dozen wagons that came undecorated.  Once done they will be weathered and the wagons will be done

Hurrah!

The steel coal wagons have gone through a 3-stage process of weathering.  First up came a rust wash - a small dab of Revell Rust and a large dab of dirty thinners washed all over the wagon and then dabbed off with kitchen towel.  Then small dabs of rust colour brushed into the corners and allows to rinse through the wash that remained on the wagon.  The stantions were picked out and door fastenings rusted.  A pass with the airbrush applied a thin coat of black.  Coal wagons were not black all over.  Finally, a pass with the weathering colour makes the wagon ready for the road.



The above picture shows the various stages - right to left (for some strange reason) (i) a virgin wagon albeit without any markings, (ii) after the application of the rust wash & dabs of rust patches, (iii) a quick spray of a rust/black mix with the airbrush and (iv) a pass with the airbrush and my normal weathering colour [Revell 87].

What I have learned here is that everything has to be subtle.  The black applied in stage (iii) above is very light - you are not looking to paint the wagon black - use your reference photos as a guide.



Above is a bit of fun - this began life as a North End coal wagon fully decorated as supplied in the Bachmann "Coal trader" pack.  To start with I used a glass fibre brush to distress the wagon.  BEWARE - these brushes create lots of invisible little fibres that you DO NOT want in your fingers.  Brush your work over an old ice cream tub to catch the pesky fibres.

Using Modelmaster ex-PW transfers, add the black weight and number panel on the left and the tare weight on the right.  I used the original tare weight (6-10-3) as a guide when choosing the new transfer - "6-10" was the closest I could get.  Note that ex-PW wagons had Pxxxxx running numbers.

I then gave the whole wagon a quick once-over with my weathering colour and Voila! a very battered ex-PW wagon in the train.

One final thought - not every 16 tonner was a rusting wreck!  Certainly they lived hard lives but I have kept a few "new" ones - just a very light touch with the weathering colour.  200,000+ were built so they were all new once!!

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Great pics and descriptions, gives me hope for when I eventually get to that stage. I too have a budget airbrush and have read the various articles about what is good and bad. Maybe, as you suggest, I shouldn't just consign it to the scrap heap but give it a good try out and see what comes out. Keep the pics and methods coming.

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Dave
I always think that "professional" magazine contributors will always lean towards top makes but Tim Shackleton did do a piece in Hornby mag about cheaper airbrushes. Naturally they were considered poor relations of the Iwata range but I think you just need to practice and see what your brush can do. 

A big plus is the compressor - I was amazed what difference the pressure made from 15psi to 35psi. Obviously you dont get that with canned air. 

My advice would be to grab some old models and have a go

For me its the coaching stock next. I will start with a few ancient Ratio 4-wheelers that I have and which are surplus to requirements. 

Barry

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Going on from the North End coal wagon -



This ex LNER 20T hopper has seen some miles.  Still betraying the livery of its former owner, 194720 is still in traffic although in a filthy old state.  This has had the full fibre pencil/rust wash/rust/black/weathering treatment.  Modelmaster do a transfer sheet of chalked comments and something like "To works when empty" would be a great addition to this old tub.

A few more pictures today as the coal wagons reach their final stage.

The 3rd coal train comprises empties but once weathered, they showed little signs internally of their use.  Therefore I decided to follow Gwiwer's lead and grab the weathering powders.  In my case, these are nothing more than coloured artist chalks.



I acquired these some time ago so please ignore the £1.50 price tag!!

[As a total aside, I am back on my main laptop - the recent Windows 10 update wiped my OS.  Luckily, Son-in-Law is a bit of a whizz and reloaded it.  I can now go back to 600x photos instead of 5700x !!!]

The artists chalks are just scraped with a scalpel into a plastic dish and then applied with an old stiff paint brush.



above - The upper wagon is just weathered but the lower one has had a dust of powder.  Its very subtle but notice how the corners are now dirty and the shiny look of the wagon floor has gone.



Old Dapol wagons have a hole in the floor that took the screw that held the body to the chassis and the load to the wagon.  My solution is to float some PVA across the floor with a cotton bud and spread it around until a skin forms over the hole.  A helping of my black chalk and it looks like a bit of coal residue.  Don't overdo this - merchants were not going to leave a couple of hundredweight of valuable coal in the bottom of a wagon.



After a bit of practice, this is what I am achieving - the inside of the wagon looks like it once held a coal load.

At the risk of repeating myself, if you find this interesting, sort yourself a couple of reference pictures and have a go - I have no more skills than most, so if I can do it, so can you.

Barry

Last edited on Mon Jun 11th, 2018 09:48 pm by Barry Miltenburg

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Its been a while since I had the time to do anything really constructive but spurred on by the efforts of everyone else, I have, at last, got something done.



I have a few new locomotive acquisitions without crew so splashed out on some Modelu3d guys.  Here they are after painting (they come in plain resin) left to right driver Bert Postlethwaite and his fireman George "Tiny" Lofthouse.  George is a crack shovel and also not too shabby on the cribbage table - loco shed champion don't you know.  The guy in the middle is the local Inspector who will be on the footplate of the 5MT borrowed from Aylesbury for assessment over this route (see earlier posts).  He looks a bit familiar so has been named Harold Chaplin.  Then comes Harry Groves, life-and-soul of any gatherinig in any pub (but never when on duty!) and his fireman Bob Lofthouse - younger brother of George.  You can see the family likeness if you look hard.........



I have also put a Springside Signal Box Interior kit together for the resin signal box at Yarslow.  The old Dapol box had an interior with levers that matched the actual signal box diagram of the place but I have not bothered this time as the box is likely to find a new home on the new layout in due course.  The instrument shelf and dado rail are just bits of plastic card whilst the back wall extends down to ground level as a support.  With Up, Down and Branch lines to look after, there are 3 sets of instruments and bells of course and a single-line tablet device near to the camera.  On the back wall is a desk, clock, noticeboard and telephone.  Hidden by the frame but visible in the shot below is the armchair and the stove.



A few coats of paint and this little project will be done.

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Hi Barry,


Great modeling, inspirational.


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Super looking stuff Barry - and the hints and tips are most helpful.  I think your weathering looks great - very effective.  Thanks for the heads up...… I might risk  a bit of practise on something

Michael

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Lovely work

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A couple of shots showing the interior of the new signal box (or should that be the new interior of the signal box?).  Painting is quite redimentary as it is really difficult to see inside the box when on the layout - see below.



The lever colours are random.

Below is the old interior of the Dapol box - I seem to have used a similar signalman!!  Here, the levers are correct for the track layout.



This is a Ratio interior kit (I think) whereas the new one is Springside.  The old box was a set of block instruments short becasue I painted them up and then lost them!!! They should occupy the middle of the instrument shelf.  It also lacked a single line tablet machine.



Here is what the old box looked like (with the roof off).

Finally (below) is the 5MT out on the road with the Inspector on the footplate.




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Hi Barry. Excellent. I have been thinking about a cabin on my Inglenook, At the junction, with the single line and token working. One thing holding me back is the painting, another thing that I will have learn. Best wishes Kevin 

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Hi all

I have jst added a new video on the Passenger trains at Yarslow.  Links to Part 1 and Part 2 below






I hope that you enjoy them

Barry


Last edited on Sun Apr 28th, 2019 08:28 pm by Barry Miltenburg

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Hi Barry.  I don’t know what setup you have to video your Locos, but it is very good, and the background sounds really fit in. I seem to be hearing, but, not seeing a piper. Is that to prove that it is set in the North East?  Best wishes Kevin 

Last edited on Mon Apr 29th, 2019 06:09 am by Passed Driver

Ed
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Brilliant :thumbs :thumbs :thumbs


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Take my hat off to you there Barry those 2 model railway videos you have made are among the best made ones i have ever seen.

Brian

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Barry

I concur!  Not only a great model railway builder but film maker too!

Michael

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Guys

I am humbled by your appreciation.  I had better not tell you how many takes are needed to get it right!!

:oops: :oops:

Barry

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Hi Barry. Do you alter the position of Loco lamps, or would that be impossible and too tedious? Or do you keep the Loco with the train together in its own cassette.   Best wishes Kevin 

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Hi Kevin

I use Springside lamps with a No 80 (I think) hole drilled in the base to fit over the lamp irons on the locomotive.  Some of them are superglued in place where I know that the engine will only perform duties related to that class of train - the B1 4-6-0's will only appear on the Express Passenger trains so have the 'A' class lamp positions.  At the moment, loco allocations are a bit fluid so I place the lamps with a tiny bit of blue-tak inside the drilled hole and this is enough to hold them in place.  Similarly, the discs used by the diesels can be held in with a bit of blue-tac temporarily or super-glue for a permanent job.

The cartridges only hold stock and I have seperate cartridges for locos.  I have a video on You Tube about them - link here for those interested.



I use a system of dowels to align the cartridges so that any loco cartridge can align with any stock cartridge.

On the new layout, I will do away with the cartridges in favour of running loops and locomotives will be allocated into "links" based on the class of train they will be hauling.  I will have 4 Express Passenger trains and an Inspection Saloon (all Class A trains) and will have 6 locomotives in the link so that there will be an element of rotation.  Likewise for the Ordinary Passenger trains and Breakdown train (Class B), Express freights, Parcels, ECS etc (all Class C).

The Working Timetables I have often show that trains changed class en route, clearly something to do with the speed of the train through various sections.  Class F becoming Class J is fairly common.  If the Class F is an empties train then it would become a J and therefore take lower priority for the latter part of the journey, perhaps where lines were busier and where it could be held in a lay-by siding.  There are also sections of 4-track main line where certain classes of train would not be permitted to use the Fast/Main line.

I am not sure that this changing of class will affect me but if I choose to incorporate it, removing or changing lamp positions with a fine pair of tweezers will be easy if I continue with the Blue-tak option.

It is worth bearing in mind that I model early 1960's when the BR Headcodes had been standardised on the old LNER/LMS Headcodes.  Midway  through the 1960's, the codes changed from A, B, C etc to 1, 2, 3 etc and lamps started to be phased out on the diesels in favour of the indicator boxes appearing on the front of locomotives.  I would therefore urge you to check the codes in use for your area and your era before copying my system.

I think that the requirement for one red and one white lamp on both ends remained in place for station pilot engines when the mid 1960's change came about.

Hope that helps.

Barry

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Hi Barry   Thank you. My only experience of travelling on a train with a Loco change Electric to Diesel, was at Wolverhampton , As for head lamps, on the London Underground we had headcodes originally for signalmen.Best wishes Kevin 

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Very well made cartridge system Barry i imagine you must have a drill jig that fits on the end of the cartridge to drill the hole and dowel hole the ensure correct alignment?

I have cartridges myself but my main reason for creating them was for trains like Blue pullman  Brighton Belle and various other multiple units that can be very fiddly to couple and uncouple with the cartridge they can remain permanently connected and be taken on and off the layout.

Brian

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 Brian

Actually I drilled the holes by hand.  I simply marked the end of the cartridge half way down the depth and then 16.5mm apart using the rails from a piece of track as a guide and an engineers square.  The holes were drilled and the dowels inserted BEFORE the track was fixed down.  It was then a simple job to lay the track on the cartridge along a centre line leaving the last 6-9 inches each end unpinned.  Connect the cartridge to the exit line and then line up the track and pin it down. 

When I made the first cartridge, I then used it to align the other 3 exit tracks so they all identical.  Once you have one fixed position, lining everything else up is easy.  They key, of course, is to have everything in line.

The cartridges are not perfect, mainly because I drilled the holes by hand and I have had to trim some of the dowels that did not go into the ends dead straight.  That said, once you get the hang of it, it's not that hard - I use hand tools every day so it becomes a natural thing.  If this was alien to you, a jig would be a much better idea!



Here is the baseboard being built with the ends of the exit tracks on the inside and the continuous run tracks on the outside.  Note the surface-mounted point motors for the curved Set-Track points I used.  All the track in this area is Set-Track.  The grey cable running around the waist level of the shed is the ring main from the fuse box.  I covered the bottom of the void with thin ply to avoid dropping trains through onto the floor but left it open until I had drilled the holes for the exit track dowels.



Here is the detail of the exit tracks - UP on the outside and DOWN on the inside.  Note the ply base of the storage area and the hole/dowel arrangement.  The "towers" and short croc clips transfer power to the cartridges via pcb strips glued to the cartridges (matching the strips stuck on the towers).  You can also see that I used the massive Hornby track fixing tacks to secure the exit track ends and to stop them moving.

Hope that all makes things clearer.

Barry

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You did really well drilling those by hand Barry certainly did the trick

I like your crocodile clip solution aswell

Mine are more basic i line up by eye and the electrical connection is 2 brass strips soldered to the underside of the connecting track bent up slightly so when you put the cassette in place you get electrical contact mind you the brass strips are not that robust.


Brian

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In the UK, Kernow Model Railways are starting to make a name for themselves as manufacturers and have just opened a new model shop in Guildford, Surrey - about 45 minutes from me.

New model shop?  A few junctions down the motorway?  Notwithstanding the need to shop for the wife's birthday, I couldn't resist.

Walk in the place and bump into Mike Wild, editor of Hornby magazine.  We've met before but, of course, I could be anyone.  Nice guy and easy to chat to.

Bought a Bachmann V1 2-6-2T for a bargain price (what was I saying about a birthday prezzie for the wife?).



Here she is with her older sister on the left.  67690 is newer by about 10 years.  Note the finer wheel profiles, better valve gear and modern coupling.  The body detail looks about the same (although finer in places) which says more about the quality of the old Bachmann stuff I think.  Certainly the mechanisms are comparable - I haven't run the new one in yet so an unfair test.  I now have 3 of these V1's and a couple of Standard 3MT's so will retire the old craqqy Hornby Class 110 3-coach DMUs and back-date the suburban trains into Trinity Square.

Kernow also did goody bags - anyone want about two dozen out of date Fleischmann, Piko and Roco HO catalogues, a load of old leaflets, a Marklin 12-inch ruler and Hornby's 2017 Yearbook?  Nice try but no cigar.  Saved by the helpfulness of the staff, the fact that its a new model shop, good advice given on various purchases I made, sense of humour from the manically busy till dollys and the quality of the displays they have laid out - oh and the use of paper bags in place of the dreadful plastic things supermarkets insist on continuing with. 

Good luck and best wishes guys.

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Great videos Barry. I know from my own experience how long they take to make! Thoroughly enjoyed the sound background.....at first I thought you had sound decoders in the locos then I checked back and realised Yarslow is DC.
I imagine it must take a while editing the sound track to achieve such a lifelike effect....excellent......so much better than the plinky plonk elevator music that I use.

Like you I try to have correct head codes on my trains so I found your comments above very interesting. The class C lamps on the School special solved a query I had. The previous evening I was watch a preserved railway video (SVR?) and I was puzzled to see a passenger train running with class C lamps. It was a private hire and I hadnt realised that non timetable passenger trains were coded C. I guess the same would apply to Football or Aintree Specials?

Regards
 

John

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Your comments regarding C Class trains are interesting.  I have a C Class train representing ECS so wonder if thats what the SVR had???  Special workings would normally carry either A or B (Express or Ordinary - usually that latter).  Most specials/relief trains were Express workings by default.  When the "Boys" special runs full, I use A class lamps.

If anyone has any further info to validate what I am doing, please let me know.  Likewise, if I've got it wrong I need to know!!

Barry

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Just had another quick look around t'internet.  Not many pictures but a few (mostly blue diesel era) showing Football Specials running under Class 1 (old Class A) headcodes.

I would still welcome any other thoughts here as pictures are not always they seem!!

Barry

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Barry Miltenburg wrote: John

Your comments regarding C Class trains are interesting.  I have a C Class train representing ECS so wonder if thats what the SVR had???  Special workings would normally carry either A or B (Express or Ordinary - usually that latter).  Most specials/relief trains were Express workings by default.  When the "Boys" special runs full, I use A class lamps.

If anyone has any further info to validate what I am doing, please let me know.  Likewise, if I've got it wrong I need to know!!

Barry


Hi Barry

I hadnt picked up on the first appearance in the video of the school train that it was empty stock.....is that ECS?

In the post 1936 GWR guide  two lamps 1 over the LH buffer and the other central is called Class D but then the GWR are always different!  The usage is express freight with some fitted requirements and a max speed of 35mph.......or Empty Coach stock not specially authorised to carry Class A headlamps .

I would imagine that the SVR train I saw was bringing empty stock into the station  so the group who chartered it could board.


My apologies for leading you astray

Cheers

John



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The GWR and the S&DJR both had their own headcodes.

Daring to be different?

[ECS is Empty Coaching Stock]

Barry

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Just a quick back-reference really.

Post 25 of this thread told the story of the "Boys" school special and how I ended up with 2 trains - one full and one empty.  The full one runs under headcode B and the empty one under code C.  The other dodge concerns the loco.  I will probably use D49's for this service - its the early 1960's and a working of this type would be an ideal turn for these old girls eeking out their last few days.  Hornby make a Railroad D49 "Cotswold" but there are no alternate names.  I bought an old Hornby D49 "Cattistock" which was not as good as "Cotswold" in terms of body detail nor in terms of chassis as it had the old horrible tender drive unit.  I managed to get another "Cotswold" cheap and simply swapped the "Cattistock" body - a bit of fettling under the boiler was all that was needed to make it fit. 

This means I now have 2 D49's which are the same Railroad chassis but different era bodies.  The chassis is actually very good.  I also have a spare "Cotswold" body of course.

The clever bit might be to re-instate the original body giving me two identical locomotives - except that one will run with B headlamps for the loaded "Boys" train and one with C lamps for the ECS working.  They will simply shuttle between the storage sidings and Highmarsh on the new layout so will never be in the scenic area at the same time so the illusion will not be found out!!  I don't even have to have the same crew as I can assume they change en route.

Barry

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Smashing layout and nice to see a track plan with proper regard to facing points and crossovers too, although to be a pedant the Lay by siding would probably have become a goods loop during WW2 to avoid delays and increase line capacity. 

Barry Miltenburg
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Hi Simon

Do you know, I hadn't considered that but it sounds so logical. 

In WW2, we had a regular submarine run to Murmansk from the North East supporting the convoys that delivered support to the Russians.  It was very seasonal given the icing of the Arctic ports.  As I imagine that Northborough could have been a submarine base, anything that increases line capacity would be a good thing.

Thanks for the thought - I will scribble a facing connection in and see what it looks like.

Barry

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For various reasons, none of which are railway related, house hunting has been on the back burner for a couple of months but on our return from Nice (Women's World Cup Football - COME ON YOU ENGLAND!! - sorry), we are back in the saddle and starting to look again.

That means that, inevitably, the current Yarslow layout will be dismantled.  So, this afternoon, Dr Beeching was seen walking around the place whistling through his teeth.

He has decreed that, with immediate effect, all regular services are to be withdrawn and only those trains required to fininsh the current work-in-progress video are to remain on the layout.  All locomotives and rolling stock is to be boxed up other than those items needed to test Long Dyke which will remain under construction.

The proposed re-wire has been abandoned and the station building will not be renewed as planned.  Work to complete the signal box and goods shed will continue as these buildings will probably feature on the new layout.  Other outstanding jobs (like the overbridge at the UP end) will now be left undone.  Any non-railway buildings, like the factory, that may be needed on the new layout will be saved and may be upgraded.  The locomotives may get weathered but, for now, they will be in storage.

Superfluous "messing about" projects - trying to motorise and improve an old Airfix turntable, trying to make a pair of ancient Hornby class 110 DMU's run properly and attempting to make working signals from a Ratio LNER signal kit that I think is older than I am - will be suspended.

The main focus will now switch to building bits for the new layout although in the absence of a definitive space, no further projects willl be started.  Those sensible one already in hand (Long Dyke module, Middle Junction track-laying and testing, a Ratio Provender Store kit and a MSG brass signal kit) are to be completed.

The latter is a bit of a leap in the dark for me.  I have never claimed any real soldering skills but I have acquired a temperature controlled iron and a range of solders and am of the opinion that until I try, I will not know whether or not I can do it.  I will either end up with a working NER starter signal or a pile of scrap brass.  In the past I have been keen to encourage others to have a go so I am heeding my own advice.

Boxing the stock will allow me to update my Rolling Stock Register - a spreadsheet detailing all of the coaches, wagons, engineering vehicles and brake vans I have.  They are categorised much like the TOPS system in the 1970's.  Each vehicle carries a unique reference number and I will note the boxes with the same number.  It has helped me to keep track of what I have and what I need going forward but if anything else, it will help whomever has to sort out the railway when I am pushing up daisies.

I have enjoyed Yarslow and look back on the various incarnations of it with happiness.  Here are a couple of pics to finish.


Yarslow Mk I - aka Edington Junction - poor scenery, old Airfix kits and colour light signals.  I did not have frog polarity switching so the point in the foreground (leading to the loco shed) was a constant source of pain.  The B1 is still in use although it is probably now hauling a much more authentic carriage consist - I claim the ignorance of youth.



Transition - the empty 12ft x 8ft shed that originally housed Yarslow Mk I was moved and allowed the construction of Yarslow Mk II.  Old bits of painted "sky" still remain on the far end.  The baseboards on the right were not re-used.  The big black thing is a packet of 8ft x 4ft 1inch expanded polystyrene sheets - I am still getting through them all - but it was a cheap way to buy them.



Yarslow Mk II - better ballasted track, point rodding and a better backscene with proper looking trees.  The signals looked good but still didn't work but at least the locomotive was carrying the correct headcode.  After this picture was taken, the track was painted and weathered as well.  The train is a 4-set of non-corridor stock which will appear on the Trinity Square services on the new layout.



The final phase.  With its replacement signal box and goods shed in place, this is the final view of the old Yarslow before dismantling begins.  Those passengers may have a long wait for their train!!


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Good luck with the house hunting... are you staying in the UK or making a dash for a more sensible country?

Very sad that Yarslow 2 is going, but looking forward to seeing whatever comes next....

Regards

Michael


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Moving home is traumatic for any model railway modeller i know i did knock me for six when the wife announced we should move soon some years back.

But i recovered and am now building the new layout.

I hope you find a home that meets all your railway needs Barry then you have the pain of dealing with the conveyance which in England is a ridiculous system.

Brian

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Hi all

Just off to sunny Liverpool to join up with the Netball World Cup. 

Had a great time in France where the ladies didn't quite make the World Cup Final.  Missed out on Lords tickets but England managed to beat a very resiliant NZ XI to win their World Cup.  I hope I am not the kiss of death for the England Netball team!!!

Some of the time in Liverpool will be house-hunting.  We have seen a few things up there with outhouses and gardens big enough for chickens and trains.

Yarslow Mk II is now devoid of rolling stock and I am going through the loco stud giving each one a full service (wheel clean, oiling axles and bearings, tweaking brushed where needed, mending those plastic wheel inners I mentioned earlier etc).  I am also going to finish the detailing with pipes, bits and beaks on the front ends where the couplings have been removed.  The weathering will have to wait but it will give me something to do between moving and starting on the railway - I estimate spending 6-9 months re-wiring, plumbing and painting alongside some of the more trivial jobs like knocking down walls and extending rooms!!!  It will also give me time to mend the signals I snapped off packing up the rolling stock :cry:.

The "Train room" is a must-have on the house list and Mrs M is still adament that I get the 24ft x 16ft that I want as an absolute minimum.  To be honest, whilst 36ft x 18ft (David Jenkinson's old empire) would be brilliant, the additional cost both financially and in terms of time would put me off.  The general feeling seems to be that I'm mad enough with 400 sqft!!

So I am going to sign off this thread as Yarslow Mk II is, to all intents and purposes, defunct.  The new layout already has a thread so I will post progress on there.

(stands, salutes, whistles "The Last Post", turns out the lights) :lol:

Barry

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:cheers


                 

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