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Yarslow - another BR(E) 1962 - Members Personal Layouts. - Model Railway Layouts. - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Wed Jun 28th, 2017 12:15 am
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Barry Miltenburg
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Hi John/Brossard

Is your layout posted on YMRC?  Be good to see some pics

Barry

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 Posted: Sat Aug 12th, 2017 05:44 pm
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Barry Miltenburg
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Good afternoon from a sunny London.  A few more pics showing latest developments - alas they have been thin for a number of reasons, mostly linked to starting a new portable/exhibition layout, the Women's UEFA Euros in the Netherlands and a whole bundle of usual domestic "stuff" - I probably don't need to elaborate do I??



We all know that this is a Ratio GWR 4-wheeled brake coach but in this guise, it will work very well as an engineers coach on my PW train.  An interior, windows and some decals will finish it off.  In my YT video "Making it Different" I mention that the vast majority of people looking at my layout would not know the difference between a PW coach and a Jumbo jet.  That coupled with the Peter Denny approach of "If it looks right, it is right", I'm happy.....



I took the plunge recently and bought a couple of Skaledale buildings as they are based on NER prototypes and I thought they would look better than the Airfix/Ratio (GWR) examples I had.  I was right although the goods shed needed to have the resin doors cut out to allow the tracks to run through.  Naughty of Hornby really.  I have a multi-speed Dremel and a load of discs/tools but a young/new modeller would really struggle to make this building work.  The final result still needs some interior paint.  Surely there is better "play" value in this building if it is modelled with the ability to run wagons onto it.  Hornby - consider yourselves scolded.



The signal box is nice but needs weathering to lose that shiny finish.  I have a Springside interior kit to add.  The old Airfix box had an interior with the correct levers for the track plan and I shall do that again.  This box is larger than its predecessor so I had to shorten the blind siding at the end of the lay-bye, paint the ground work under the old track-bed and then re-site the outside loo.  My quick 10-minutes-in-the-shed planting the new signal box took over an hour!!  Happy days.



Finally, a bit more bent history.  In 1962, BR(NE)R used the Yarslow line to trial the Standard 4-6-0 5MT locomotives as possible replacements for the ageing B12, B1 and B17 fleet.  73069 was actually an Aylesbury engine at the time, bought in for the trials.  Seen here approaching Yarslow, she ran the semi-fast diagrams with ease. 

Load of sheep-dip of course - I like the look of these engines and needed an excuse to own one  :lol:

Since taking this photo I have shortened the distance between the loco and tender and removed the front coupling.  The paint is still wet on the eventual crew and I will put an inspector with the footplatemen to add credibility to my historical nonsense.

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 Posted: Sun Aug 13th, 2017 01:59 am
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MaxSouthOz
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It all looks very convincing from here, Barry.  :thumbs



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 Posted: Wed Mar 7th, 2018 01:20 am
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Barry Miltenburg
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Hi guys

I have not posted anything for a while for various totally unconnected reasons so thought that an update was in order. 

I have today posted a video update onto my Yarslow YouTube channel - link below

Winter Update at Yarslow

Enjoy

Barry

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 Posted: Wed May 9th, 2018 05:31 pm
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Barry Miltenburg
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Yet another long gap between posts driven by, amongst other things, a busy schedule that has meant that I have had a lot less time than I wanted in the shed.  Doesn't THAT sound familiar?

Anyway, I set myself the "Wagon Project" task - having populated all of the coaches and staffed all of the locomotives, it was time to add loads to all of the appropriate wagons.  I had a couple of packs of wagon sheets in stock, lumps of polystyrene and some crushed coal, and a few new acquisitions from eBay including crates, boxes etc etc.  The final purchase was a goodly supply of superglue and some fine thread used by model boaty types for rigging.



Here is the result of a coule of hours work - six crates on a Lowfit.  The crates came as laser cut kits- each crate had 8 parts!!!   The rigging string is simply knotted at the end to represent a lashing and then glued to the wagon's fixing ring.  From the obligatory 24 inches, it looks a lot less crude that this.



Here is variation on the same theme - except that I cannot remember for the life of me what these white drums actually are.  They are hard and made from some unknown compacted powder and may well have come out of an old electrical installation I dismantled but whatever they are, they look brilliant as a wagon load.  Ropes as before.



Lots of these done - polystyrene base, shaped into a slight "pile" shape and then covered in PVA and coal lumps.  I think my coal came from old BBQ cinders just crushed up.  I have made about 40 of these for the various trains on the layout.



An eBay purchase - packets of barrels.  A quick paint and then just glued in.  Note that only empty barrels can be carried lying down.  The wagon on the left has a number of timber baulks (balsa) to stop the wagons moving.



This train came about as a result of a bit of a brain teaser.  I have repainted/weathered 4 old Hornby GWR clerestory coaches to represent some older NER coaches of dubious origin (certainly not in the diagram book methinks!!).  Based on a photograph I have, the train represents a special working for the local boys boarding school, carrying the darling children to school at the start of term and home again at the end of term.  My problem was how to represent the train as full one way and empty when returning.  I originally thought that I would put passengers on one side only so that when the coaches were turned around, it would appear that the coaches were empty.  That idea crashed and burned when I realised that the branch on the new layout will face the other way to the junction and therefore a spectator would see both sides of the train during its journey.

The solution turned out to be simple - build two trains and have one full one and one empty one.  In the photo above, the new train is seen on the branch loop of the old layout.  The first (brake) coach is from the original train and the back 4 coaches are from the new train.  I thought that I had painted them all the same colour but when put together, it appears not!!  Never mind.



This close up of the one of the all 3rds (2nds in 1961 I guess) shows that the coaches have had seats added and new glazing.  The repaint has left the door handles the same colour as the body but this will be remedied with a bit of dry-brushed "brass" paint. 

Just out of shot in the first photo is the D49 4-4-0 that will haul the train.  This is one of the Hornby Railroad D49's with chassis drive in place of the old rubbish tender drive.  I already had one of these - 62760 "The Cotswold" but Hornby had not released any other BR black versions.  I bought an old body for 62758 "Cattistock" that had come from an original tender drive locomotive and another 62670 model.  A little bit of fettling later and the old body fitted perfectly onto the new Railroad chassis - voila!!  I still have an old tender drive version "Cheshire" and it's interesting to note the high quality of even the Railroad stuff against what we used to find acceptable.

The big summer project is weathering my 50 locomotives, dozens of coaches and some 400 wagons.  Deep breath, get sitting comfortable, begin..............

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 Posted: Mon May 28th, 2018 03:13 pm
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Barry Miltenburg
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Bank Holiday weekend in the UK and the sun is shining - make a note people, it doesn't happen very often.

A great time therefore to start the next job - The Weathering Project.

An auspicious start in the week when a Windows 10 update totally wrecked the operating system of my laptop to the extent that it doesn't even know it has a desktop or where any of the files are.  Therefore, I am coming at you from the keyboard of the ancient little laptop that normally only displays my operating sequence for my Yarslow layout.  I didn't realise how slow it was!!!!!!

Anyways, with apologies for the lack of photos (to follow when the laptop is recovered) I thought I would share my experiences of weathering from the standpoint of a total novice.

I am fortunate to have a magazine library that began in 1972 and comprises all of the Railway Modeller and Hornby issues.  They have been carefully indexed on Excel so a quick search revealed a handful of articles that I have read and re-read.  This has taught me how useful those hours spent indexing have been.

I thought that the Badger 200 airbrush I so proudly own and paid (what I thought was) a fortune for would be ideal but it turns out to be a "budget" model and fairly useless for intricate work.  Tim Shackleton (Hornby Mag) recommends the  Iwata Revolution M1 single-action airbrush as the best single-action tool he has used.  Before parting with £100 however, I thought that the Badger deserved a fair trial.

Some years ago, I made the forsighted decision to buy a compressor at a local show.  Not sure who makes it but its marked "AS18 1/6hp".  It has an adjustable pressure valve, clear gauge and a condensation trap built in.  The badger was hooked up and away I went using a paint mix recommended by Mr Shackleton (acrylic Humbrol black 33 and leather 62 thinned down to a milky consistency).  The Badger turned out to be erratic at best, splattering and spluttering at the recommended 32psi.  Cleaning the airbrush, fresh paint mix, new consistency, lower/higher pressure were all tried in the hour spent "weathering" a pile of ancient Triang wagons and some of the kit-built stuff I built 30 years ago.

In a final bid to get any sort of decent result and having run out of Humbrol 62, I went for new pot of Wood (110) which I had previously thinned with acrylic thinners down to a painting consistency.  Clean brush and voila!  I was suddenly cutting grass.  Spraying at about 20psi from about 6-9 inches gave me the ability to give a wagon a gentle all-over weathered effect.  Another pass along the axleboxes and running gear with the wagon upside down gave that area extra tone.  I think I will need to go back with a brake block colour to touch around the underframes but I am happy.

Moral of the story?  Research your subject from people who are paid to do it in magazines etc - other opinions are available but they will give you a starting point.  Get some decent reference photos from the thousands of books that are published.  (Avoid heritage line pictures as their wagons are spangly clean!!)  Have a go irrespective of the equipment you have - I accept that I am using basic equipment but its working for me.  When I come to do locomotives, I may have to shell out for the Iwata but for now, the Badger rocks on.  If at first you don't succeed, try again.  I will post a picture of my first wagon - basically an old MR box van that was grey but now looking like it got caught in the middle of a mud-chucking fight!!!!!  Thomas Edison said that you only fail when you stop trying...........

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 Posted: Mon May 28th, 2018 03:47 pm
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Passed Driver
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Hi Barry    During the dates that you mention I was spending.my money on globetrotting. Don’t mention Windows 10 too much, when I purchased my HP laptop( for cash:mrgreen::mutley) it was using windows 8 , and it worked fine, until that is, I upgraded to W10. Ever since it is  a. PITA.And further to my W10 woes I am depending on my “Hacked ipad “. One day I will , maybe, get sorted out until then I will keep my fingers crossed.trying to extend and improve my own small railway empire.  Best wishes. Kevin



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 Posted: Tue May 29th, 2018 04:57 am
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gdaysydney
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Hi Barry,

Just caught up with your posts. :oops:   Your work is very inspiring  - lovely detail. :thumbs :thumbs



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 Posted: Tue May 29th, 2018 07:33 pm
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Barry Miltenburg
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Dave - thank you for your comments.

As promised, I now have some pics.  Apologies for the size but I have no photo editing software on this laptop and it only run Windows SE so I am struggling to download anything to use!!



This is the first ever attempt with the compressor banging away at 32psi and the airbrush wide open.  Net result was a mud-pie delivery of paint onto the side of this beautiful MR box van.  It's actually grey under all that gunge.



These are some of the wagons I am practising on - old Ratio and Slaters kits from yonks ago.  The LT&SR Stores wagon shows that the Badger is not really good at picking out rusty elements.  I have improved a bit on this with a few more tries but it really shows itself up here.  It is fine for doing general weathering though.....



These two wagons are identical other than I have given the one on the left a light once-over with my weathering paint.  Today I switched to Revell and found it much better.  This is one of the earthy tones, thinned 1:1 with Humbrol acrylic thinners.  25psi and the nozzle adjusted to produce a very fine mist of paint directed upwards from track level.  The roof is sprayed ALONG its length, not sideways.  When the shininess of the plastic vanishes, it's done.

I learned a few key lessons very quickly here; (1) you cannot rush weathering.  A few passes with a light mist is a millions times better than trying to splat the paint on if you expect it to look anything,  (2) when you think you have done enough, you probably have.  The worst results I got came when I thought that it needed just one more pass, (3) have a box-fresh wagon standing by to refer to.  The weathering is very subtle and its easy to assume that you haven't applied any paint,  (4) don't forget the wheels.  I weathered a dozen bogie bolsters and then found that the wheels looked like gobstoppers - some parts coloured, some parts not.  I had to take all the wheelsets out, spray them and put them all back in!!  (5) you can't airbrush a wagon and then wait 10 minutes before doing the next one.  Its not good for your nozzle, (6)  paint on the rusty bits, brake dust, oil etc BEFORE you weather.  The weathering colour blends it all in  (7)  don't forget to give the factory weathered stock a light dust as well.  The best layouts display a common set of tones and this needs to carry through to the ready weathered stuff.



This is where the day ended - the wagon on the right is box-fresh whilst the one on the left has had a light dust.  When they are assembled in a train, the fresh wagons stick out a mile.

Tomorrow I am going to tackle some 16T steels with rusty bits.  I will let you know how it goes.

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 Posted: Sun Jun 3rd, 2018 11:26 am
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Barry Miltenburg
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Having now weathered a whole bunch of wagons - some looking good, some I had to strip back and start again - I got to the oil tanks train.  Advice says that you do the base colours first and then weather a dust coat over the top.

A quick look at a few reference photos and I started with a Revell matt black thinned for the trusty Badger with a brushful of rusty red (not very technical, I just added some until it looked a bit "oily" and not just black). 

This was sprayed on, concentrating on the filler cap area on top of the tank with overspill running down the sides.  The reference photos are your best guide.



Again I apologise for the massive photo but I am still on the old laptop.  The two wagons in the foreground as out-of-the-box whilst those behind have had the oil added.  You can see the staining on the buff coloured BP tank.  This is great fun because the reference photos show that the patterns were not at all regular so some wagons have big spills, others only lightly stained.  All have had a dusting of the oily black all over.  At this stage, its OK to get a bit excited about your achievements :)



Here, the wagons have had a second dusting with the Revell 87 weathering tone concentrating on the underframe with an all-over dust to tone down the oil stains.  This may not score top marks on Bunkerbarge's Pendon Course but I am happy with it - I claim Rule 2 (the 24inch viewing rule) and Rule 1  :lol:



Back to one-colour weathering with the Fish train.  The improvement in the blue wagons was quite remarkable, going from looking fairly toy-like to work-worn with a few passes of the Badger.  Don't forget to give the weathering a quick burst down between the containers.  A good test of your aiming skills!!



A wider shot of the train showing the BR white insulated vans with the recessed doors - apparently they were notorious for gathering filth in the door recesses so I have tightened the spray nozzle right down and given this area a bit of special treatment before opening up for a general dusting across the whole of the wagon.  They actually look whiter in this picture than they do in real life.  Note that on the Conflat A to the left of the white van, the blue insul container is dirtier at the bottom than the top - achieved by spraying upwards from the bottom of the wagon at an angle to represent the dirt being thrown up from below.  Its actually easier to do than describe!!

Back in the day, the Railway Modeller had the tag line "For The Average Modeller" and I would put myself firmly in this category.  There are layouts that are a lot better than mine built by people with more skill than I have and there are layouts at the other end of the spectrum.  I'm happy with that.  I am more happy with the fact that 2 weeks ago I had never airbrushed anything of any note and now I am getting satisfactory results across the wagon fleet.

Its amazing what you can achieve if you read up first, look at the real thing and then have a go.  If I can do it, anyone can.

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 Posted: Sun Jun 3rd, 2018 12:24 pm
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Well done Barry.
Lovely layout & some very nicely weathered stock as well.
Love those tankers.


Tony.



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 Posted: Sun Jun 3rd, 2018 08:14 pm
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Barry Miltenburg
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Thank you Tony - hope that I can insprire those who think they can't do this when they probably can.

I have spoken a lot about reference photos so thought it would be useful to share at least one good source - see below.



This sort of book is invaluable, chiefly because its in colour.  Beware the effects of 1960's film and the effect it has on colours but its a brilliant start point.


Back to two-colour weathering today with a straight copy of wagons illustrated in the above book.  Pg 59 shows cement wagons and how they had a coating of powder on the top and over the sides.  This effect was achieved with a very light grey Humbrol 127 lightened with a bit of white.  Spray from the top - a bit like the oil tankers but the whole roof is virtually grey.  Spraying from the top gives you that effect of powder spilling over the sides.  Once the grey was dry, I came back in with my trusty Badger and the Revell 87 earth weathering colour to tone it down.  I didn't apply this earth colour to the top so that the light grey remained dominant.

I am left with my 3 coal trains to do (about 60 wagons) so hopefully I can get a couple of sessions in the shed this week to do (a) the black/rust base coats and (b) the weathering over the top.  That leaves me a handful of wagons that need work (I found YET another Conflat A with a container load that needs chains despite my checking and double-checking last time :???: :???: ) or where I haven't finished the lettering/numbering etc.  I will then move on to the coaching stock - after a bit of research and practice of course!!

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 Posted: Sun Jun 10th, 2018 08:35 pm
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Barry Miltenburg
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Hurrah!

Today I managed to finish those coal wagons that are ready to be done.  I took delivery of a couple of sets of Modelmaster wagon transfer sheets that allowed me to renumber the ex-PO wagons.  I have just ordered some 16T sheets for half a dozen wagons that came undecorated.  Once done they will be weathered and the wagons will be done

Hurrah!

The steel coal wagons have gone through a 3-stage process of weathering.  First up came a rust wash - a small dab of Revell Rust and a large dab of dirty thinners washed all over the wagon and then dabbed off with kitchen towel.  Then small dabs of rust colour brushed into the corners and allows to rinse through the wash that remained on the wagon.  The stantions were picked out and door fastenings rusted.  A pass with the airbrush applied a thin coat of black.  Coal wagons were not black all over.  Finally, a pass with the weathering colour makes the wagon ready for the road.



The above picture shows the various stages - right to left (for some strange reason) (i) a virgin wagon albeit without any markings, (ii) after the application of the rust wash & dabs of rust patches, (iii) a quick spray of a rust/black mix with the airbrush and (iv) a pass with the airbrush and my normal weathering colour [Revell 87].

What I have learned here is that everything has to be subtle.  The black applied in stage (iii) above is very light - you are not looking to paint the wagon black - use your reference photos as a guide.



Above is a bit of fun - this began life as a North End coal wagon fully decorated as supplied in the Bachmann "Coal trader" pack.  To start with I used a glass fibre brush to distress the wagon.  BEWARE - these brushes create lots of invisible little fibres that you DO NOT want in your fingers.  Brush your work over an old ice cream tub to catch the pesky fibres.

Using Modelmaster ex-PW transfers, add the black weight and number panel on the left and the tare weight on the right.  I used the original tare weight (6-10-3) as a guide when choosing the new transfer - "6-10" was the closest I could get.  Note that ex-PW wagons had Pxxxxx running numbers.

I then gave the whole wagon a quick once-over with my weathering colour and Voila! a very battered ex-PW wagon in the train.

One final thought - not every 16 tonner was a rusting wreck!  Certainly they lived hard lives but I have kept a few "new" ones - just a very light touch with the weathering colour.  200,000+ were built so they were all new once!!

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 Posted: Mon Jun 11th, 2018 05:57 am
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DaveH_Murcia
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Great pics and descriptions, gives me hope for when I eventually get to that stage. I too have a budget airbrush and have read the various articles about what is good and bad. Maybe, as you suggest, I shouldn't just consign it to the scrap heap but give it a good try out and see what comes out. Keep the pics and methods coming.

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 Posted: Mon Jun 11th, 2018 11:49 am
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Barry Miltenburg
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Dave
I always think that "professional" magazine contributors will always lean towards top makes but Tim Shackleton did do a piece in Hornby mag about cheaper airbrushes. Naturally they were considered poor relations of the Iwata range but I think you just need to practice and see what your brush can do. 

A big plus is the compressor - I was amazed what difference the pressure made from 15psi to 35psi. Obviously you dont get that with canned air. 

My advice would be to grab some old models and have a go

For me its the coaching stock next. I will start with a few ancient Ratio 4-wheelers that I have and which are surplus to requirements. 

Barry

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 Posted: Mon Jun 11th, 2018 09:39 pm
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Barry Miltenburg
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Going on from the North End coal wagon -



This ex LNER 20T hopper has seen some miles.  Still betraying the livery of its former owner, 194720 is still in traffic although in a filthy old state.  This has had the full fibre pencil/rust wash/rust/black/weathering treatment.  Modelmaster do a transfer sheet of chalked comments and something like "To works when empty" would be a great addition to this old tub.

A few more pictures today as the coal wagons reach their final stage.

The 3rd coal train comprises empties but once weathered, they showed little signs internally of their use.  Therefore I decided to follow Gwiwer's lead and grab the weathering powders.  In my case, these are nothing more than coloured artist chalks.



I acquired these some time ago so please ignore the £1.50 price tag!!

[As a total aside, I am back on my main laptop - the recent Windows 10 update wiped my OS.  Luckily, Son-in-Law is a bit of a whizz and reloaded it.  I can now go back to 600x photos instead of 5700x !!!]

The artists chalks are just scraped with a scalpel into a plastic dish and then applied with an old stiff paint brush.



above - The upper wagon is just weathered but the lower one has had a dust of powder.  Its very subtle but notice how the corners are now dirty and the shiny look of the wagon floor has gone.



Old Dapol wagons have a hole in the floor that took the screw that held the body to the chassis and the load to the wagon.  My solution is to float some PVA across the floor with a cotton bud and spread it around until a skin forms over the hole.  A helping of my black chalk and it looks like a bit of coal residue.  Don't overdo this - merchants were not going to leave a couple of hundredweight of valuable coal in the bottom of a wagon.



After a bit of practice, this is what I am achieving - the inside of the wagon looks like it once held a coal load.

At the risk of repeating myself, if you find this interesting, sort yourself a couple of reference pictures and have a go - I have no more skills than most, so if I can do it, so can you.

Barry

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