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John Dew
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The fiddle yard is the first thing visitors see when they enter the Train Room



Within the room the storage yard is hidden by a long row of Metcalfe terraced houses with the exception of the space at the end




This desirable piece of real estate has been vacant and undeveloped for about eight years while I pondered on the best way of building something that would fill the space.....and stretch over some sort of bridge to shield the yard from the entrance to the room.

I started building the Scalescene Low Relief Warehouse kit before Christmas but made little progress. The problem being that one unit was too small and two units too big. Trying to build one unit  and combine it symmetrically with two thirds of a unit was challenging. Fortunately my problem was solved when John Wiffen announced his new improved Warehouse kit.

The new kit is typical Scalescenes relying on building up a series of sub assemblies of laminated card which are then strengthened further with vertical buttresses/columns and horizontal plinths and ledges. This kit can be extended vertically and/or horizontally with lots of options for added detail.

I thought I would just post a few photo showing how the build is progressing rather than a detailed how to do it but always happy to answer any questions




The three columns above will be combined to make one module.




This shows windows plinths and window sills that need to be added

The window sill covering the full width are a big plus........they were very fiddly on previous versions having to be applied individually.

The exposed arch cut lines look bad in these shots but its just the camera angle l


 


The default design has a base unit and one window unit. I want more height hence the second window unit

The base unit can be varied in a number of ways. Other options : full length arched doors,one over sized door or large windows

So now the components of each module have to be joined together plus a lot of cutting still to be done on the remaining two modules! I sure get through a lot of blades!.

 


 

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Hi John .
I admit to sharpening  some blades for a while before throwing them away, get a bit more out of them that way.
Looking good so far John ,i will keep  watching :thumbs.

John Dew
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Thanks Reg......here is chapter two :) .

Each module contains 3 sub units.

A door unit, window unit and a second that I am adding

The base unit is glued to the interior buttresses as shown below



A ledge is glued to the top of the door unit followed by the first window unit



Setting three relatively small laminated units up like this sure exposes any cutting/glueing errors which I suspect know will haunt me later on :oops:

The modules are then glued to columns made of 5 sections of 2mm heavy card laminated together.

Here is my column factory



As you can see the column template only allows for the default door + window unit. Mine needed to be longer.
The instructions suggest constructing two separate columns......a regular length as per the template to which is added an extension .......joined together with a strengthening fillet in the centre. I decided to cut full length columns for greater strength and to  try and ensure smooth surfaces on all four sides. I used the cutting marks on the template to measure out the extension.

Despite taking all manner of precautions I  always have problems ensuring four totally smooth surfaces on these laminated columns. I am guaranteed two and I ensure the third by assembling and clamping an a flat surface.......and hoping I can conceal the inevitably uneven fourth :shock:  There looks to be a particularly bad one below but its partly the camera....I hope

So having cut and laminated 5 columns the next job is to apply the cover layers



The final touch is to attach 1mm card wrapped in black paper to simulate a drain pipe. 

Next step is line up a column and glue to a module.



Sadly the column is about 2mm short. It aligns perfectly with the default layout of Door + Window unit but does not align with the second window unit




The work around was to glue a second extension cover layer as shown below....... 



 I guess I am getting very old and placid.......there were hardly any choice words......just a painful reminder that when doing a new build its better to do one sub unit at a time rather than a mass build........just one column would have revealed the problem!

John specifies 2mm approx  for heavy card and 1mm approx.for medium card. I use mill board..... its cheaper and easier to cut than mat board (UK mounting board).  Heavy Millboard is exactly 2mm but the medium is about 1.2 mm. Most times (and I have built lots of kits) its not an issue but in this instance I guess it was 

So finally here we have all 4 units butt jointed to the 5 columns.




Floors and sides need to be added which hopefully will give it a lot more stability. Right now its quite flimsy....I had hope to photo it propped up in situ but didnt want to risk it

I am not a fan of butt joints.....laying a column over the modules as in the old warehouse kit creates far more stability and hides a load of errors.

In fairness the default unit consists of just 2 modules x 2 sub units.........this is three times bigger 4 modules x 3 sub units....... I have perhaps been a bit ambitious........time will tell! 

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It certainly is an ambitious project, John.

I have great confidence in you.  :thumbs

sparky
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I think you are doing very well John , its never as easy to do as it looks .
Could be your printer was a tad out with that r/hand column that gave you a problem,
Looks OK now.   I would be pleased with that if it was mine.

John Dew
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MaxSouthOz wrote: It certainly is an ambitious project, John.

I have great confidence in you.  :thumbs

Thanks Max......You are always such a great morale booster! :lol:

Cheers

John

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sparky wrote: I think you are doing very well John , its never as easy to do as it looks .
Could be your printer was a tad out with that r/hand column that gave you a problem,
Looks OK now.   I would be pleased with that if it was mine.

Hi Reg

Another great cheer leader :thumbs

All the pillars were out unfortunately even though I cut the extension pieces to John's templates.

My use of 1.2 mm card for the ledges will have accumulated up.......one minor error can quickly add up in a multiple build and I probably didnt not glue them in snug enough.......one lives and learns........even at my age

Cheers

John

 

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You are doing well with it.

I have seen comments from other people building the kit as standard having the same problem so you are not the only one with the problem.

Petermac
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Having witnessed your Scalescenes skills before John, I'm with Max on this one - full of confidence that all will turn out perfectly in the end and you'll produce yet another stunning building........... ;-)

A very clever method of hiding a yard within a "town scene".
Always an inspiration to watch developments on Granby - following it with interest. :cheers

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Hi John,

Ambition always brings challenges and so it follows that the challenge increases with one's greater ambition. Fortunately, your experience is more than capable in overcoming all slings and arrows and Granby continues onwards and upwards. Well done, it looks grand!

Bill

  

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Progressing along nicely John, looking forward to seeing the finished build.

John Dew
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Thanks for all the encouraging comments guys......I dont intend to be pessimistic but in a "warts and all" thread I think its best to mention all the screw ups.....if only to help others avoid them.

A lot of progress made this week

Hardly surprising considering the weather.

We went from this



To this overnight



and its still snowing


I have added flooring to the front section and it is now far more stable.

The instructions specify individual floor be cut for each module which are  subsequently joined together with support tabs.

I thought it would be more stable if I cut the floors in continuous lengths for all four modules

This is the lower floor being fitted



I double laminated this floor and its glued lower than the plan because, as you will soon see, it will rest on a piece of 1/2" ply  that hangs over some of the storage sidings





These are floorboard overlays being set up. I dont normally bother with interior detail but in this case there will be loads of skylights on the roof and windows all round .....so I will finish the top floor

Fortunately I measured the floors from the completed front section rather than the individual templates. You can see a 2mm gap above.....which would, of course, have accumulated with each module!!

The next shot is of the underside and the joist template



The joists are 2 x 2 mm card laminated together......4 joists per module  16 joists per floor.

4 floors........64 joists     128 pieces of 2mm card..........the mind boggles. I compromised with just three floors ........double laminated the base floor and only 8 joists on the centre floor.

Because of the length i inserted a couple of interior walls. Its now :thumbs solid as a rock and thats without sides or back
 
Here is the unit roughly in place on its base over the sidings



The next job is to produce 2 sides each of one module and a back of four modules. The unit can be seen from all four sides so all the modules will have to follow the same process as the front except they have to be 2 3/8" shorter

The top floor seems to be sagging but that should be corrected (I hope) when the sides are attached












I havent made up my mind about the space.....I may build a low relief pub and either put it there or shuffle the terraced house up and put the pub next to the shops.

There is a lot more to do before I worry about that! First job tomorrow is to run a few trains.......round and round to make absolutely certain my clearances are good.......the spaces between a couple of sidings are very narrow and I have a wafer thin support which seems ok .....but better safe than sorry

Best wishes from Vancouver

John

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That fits in brilliantly John :thumbs



Ed


(PS You've a wagon derailed at the back :mutley)

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Oh Yes. :thumbs

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That looks really good John, hope the clearances were OK? 

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Thanks guys......glad you like it

Thanks for the heads up Ed......I hadnt spotted  that one  :oops: Took me a while to sort how it happened there then I remembered that I lifted the loco off........as part of my mega weathering project :roll:

Ron The clearances worked fine thankfully :thumbs..........I have a number of T shirts from failing to do elementary checks in the past :oops:


Cheers

John

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Lovely weather...................................and very nice modelling :doublethumb :cheers

John Dew
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Glad you like it so far Kev :thumbs

I have got rather behind with my updates........the last couple of weeks has been what I call " in the trenches" mode.  .......lots of cutting and pasting but not exactly newsworthy.

In fact I became too enthusiastic with the task....sitting too long doing repetitive cutting is not recommended for pensioners with back problems. Enforced bed rest delayed the project somewhat.

First job was to fit the sides. They are a single module wide but have to be reduced in height because the unit overhangs the storage yard. It a good illustration of the kits versatility. I used one full window unit (2 rows), cut a second unit down to one row and chopped 3/4" off a plain base unit. I made the construction simpler by eliminating the sub assemblies and mounted the cutting templates (carefully!) on to a single base card rather than joining 3 separate base cards as I did at the front.

 
.

Next step .....the roof. The instructions call for 4 separate roof units which are then butt joined together. I preferred to cut one unit measured to fit the entire length.....thus allowing for the dimensionall discrepancies created by me using mill board. It is also easier to fit and more robust

Here is the roof being cut out


 
The cut outs are for 3 North Lights and a Skylight. You can also see the notches cut out to accommodate the columns.

4mm Joists were added for the entire length making the sub assembly quite rigid

 

I dont think individual roof units would have worked at all well.

The shot above shows the back in place but in reality the back is closed in after the roof is fitted




As with the sides, each module is a single piece of base card sandwiched between columns. The viewer will see very little of the lower section because I am going to scratch build a boiler house on the module with the internal brick


Next job making the North Lights......heres the assembly line



I made a lot of these for the Engine Shed and this is definitely an improved design. Its still very fiddly, as you can see! A good tip is to bend the roof unit into shape immediately after scoring the ben line and before cutting out the window apertures.

The woodwork prints out as pale silvery grey. I wanted it to have some relationship with the green doors at ground level so I washed with diluted green rather than proper painting because I wanted to keep the printed detail. Its a bit crude right now but weathering should improve the look.



I am going to add a plant room/lift house behind the skylight.

A Hipped skylight assembly is a third roof window option. It is a very flexible kit .....all sorts of choices. You could just leave the roof plain if you wish.

 



Cruel closeup  but a reminder of the problem I have with the front columns being 2mm too short..........fortunately I have devised a cunning plan which will level everything before I start installing the parapets later today

 

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By Jove!  It's an epic build, John.

I love "cunning plans."    :lol:

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I love this build, that is truly awesome. It inspires me to do big builds of my own

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An impressive and imposing build that will create a significant view block to your yard John! 
Following along. 

Marty

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Thanks for the comments guys.......sorry I am late acknowledging them :oops: 

You will be relieved to learn that the cunning plan worked.

I was able to fit a thin 2mm fillet covered in appropriate paper as a sub ledge on the front. I then fitted the upper ledges, which serve as a foundation for the parapets, on a level surface all the way around




Its the finishing detail on Scalescene models that take the time but make the model.

10 double thickness parapets and 10 supporting pillars. Each pillar is made up 7 small rectangles of 2mm card.

You dont have to do the math......the next two shots show the pillar production line



I have made a number of the old warehouse kits. Its interesting to note the many subtle improvements that John has introduced. With the old kit the cap layers were just a tad small so one always had to touch up the corners.......one set of flaps seems just a little bigger with a fuller curve.......result no touch up





Pillars and parapets in place...........hopefully you will agree.....time well spent




The gap between the upper ledge and the pillar above each drain pipe is part of the design ........there is a very small drain header header detail that I have yet to fit.

The parapet cover layers in the kit are mostly plain but there are a couple that replicate an engraved company name. However the ones above were home made using an Office Libre spreadsheet. A cell is set to the exact dimensions of the kit cover layer. Appropriate font selected and background colour customised to match the kit. To my annoyance the camera has exaggerated the colour difference......its much closer in real life honest.

A bit of history........I have been concerned for a while now that Granby looks more like an East Lancs Mill town than anywhere I could recall in North Wales! So I Googled " Textile production in North Wales" and found that Courtaulds employed over 3000 people in three large mills in Flint the largest of which was Castle Works. Bit embarrassing really.....in another life, many years ago, I used to buy knitwear for Littlewoods......much of it from Courtaulds

Moving on......I added some scratch built extras......a Lifthouse/Plant Room (there is one in the kit but I preferred to  build my own)




A boiler house and signage.........lining up the decorative bands was fun....not!




A loading bay and canopy are supplied in the kit but they are only for individual modules....I preferred to build one that spanned both modules 




There is a lot of weathering to do and I need to add some people and product.

Castle works produced viscose (artificial silk) marketed as Rayon and subsequently Tricel........I am guessing the input would be mostly chemicals but the output would be thread on cones......probably transported in cardboard cartons???.........any advice/ comments on what would be appropriate  for 1947-8 much appreciated

There is no chimney in this kit.............I had just printed out and glued up the sheets from the old warehouse kit and I got an email from Scalescenes announcing a new improved industrial chimney! :shock:

More next week

  Best wishes from Vancouver.......where would you believe it is still snowing




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Time very much well spent! That looks beautiful

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It does, John.  It looks excellent!



Tell me about the white on green sign writing.  How did you achieve it?

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Very impressive building John, looks absolutely bl@@dy wonderful :doublethumb


Ed





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Brendan,Max and Ed......Thanks for the compliments glad you like it.........not forgetting the Elephant stamp Max :lol:

Max:

The signage is a cell from a spread sheet just like the parapet cover layer except it has the addition of a border.

Not sure about Excel but with Office Libre (and yes its free) when you expand the width of a column or depth of a row the cursor shows the exact measurement......to two decimal places.......really handy. Thats how I finally sorted my Mark III coach boards

Big range of font styles and sizes. You can select font colour and background colour or mix your own. Its much easier to set up a consistent colour background in a spreadsheet than Word (or similar)

You can set up a border for the selected cell from the format tab and vary the width and colour

Hope this helps








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Thanks, John.

I'm mostly interested in how you got white lettering.

John Dew
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Just select White as the data colour although on reflection I actually selected the lightest grey available.You have to set up a coloured background otherwise you can't see what you have typed:roll:

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Thanks, John.  I was just about to say that I figured it out.  :oops:


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I was just thinking John. Wouldn't those terraced houses be an awful place to live - unless you were an avid train spotter!! An incredible model, which will look the part when finally finished and will work well hiding the fiddle yard.

Bob

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Such neat work John, very well done. I used to light the catwalks for modelling clothes ,Crimplene and Brinylon and M&S
Toured the country and part Europe,    There was schedule E tax exclusion in those days for entertaining .that was stopped and so were fashion shows generally .  Love the modelling have to have a look at libra office now.

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A very imposing building John and one that will draw the eye away from the train storage. Your Scalescene's builds are always worthy of an Elephant stamp. Wish I had one to give.

I don't know much about the textile industry but I suspect that you are right that outgoing goods would be in cardboard packaging .

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Have a look in your photo gallery, Nick.

You will get a nice surprise.


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Hi John Brilliant modelling scene  Modelling at its best Well done.From a +4c South Wales
Noviceman

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Bob K wrote: I was just thinking John. Wouldn't those terraced houses be an awful place to live - unless you were an avid train spotter!! An incredible model, which will look the part when finally finished and will work well hiding the fiddle yard.

Bob

Thanks Bob.

I agree.....life in the industrial north must have been pretty dire and it continued like that right into the fifties. Mind you some of the replacement tower blocks were pretty bad.

Cheers

John

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sparky wrote: Such neat work John, very well done. I used to light the catwalks for modelling clothes ,Crimplene and Brinylon and M&S
Toured the country and part Europe,    There was schedule E tax exclusion in those days for entertaining .that was stopped and so were fashion shows generally .  Love the modelling have to have a look at libra office now.

Hi Reg

That takes me back ......you missed Acrilan and Courtelle though :lol: We used to do an annual show.....right pain...the London press were pretty condescending about anything coming out of Liverpool :roll:

Office Libre is cool I really like it......not least because it offers much smaller fonts than Word

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pnwood wrote: A very imposing building John and one that will draw the eye away from the train storage. Your Scalescene's builds are always worthy of an Elephant stamp. Wish I had one to give.

I don't know much about the textile industry but I suspect that you are right that outgoing goods would be in cardboard packaging .

Thanks Nick

Glad you like it......far cry from Much Murkle.....but all linked by God's Wonderful Railway :lol:

Delighted, but not at all surprised, that the show went so well

In another place John Flann has also suggested cartons and cylindrical containers for spindles......I will try and mock something up.

Cheers

John Dew
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MaxSouthOz wrote: Have a look in your photo gallery, Nick.

You will get a nice surprise.



:thumbs

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Noviceman wrote: Hi John Brilliant modelling scene  Modelling at its best Well done.From a +4c South Wales
Noviceman

Thanks so much......glad you like it

4o sounds quite pleasant......its snowing again here.

As an aside I dont normally support Wales but I do hope your team wins on Friday night! :lol:

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MaxSouthOz wrote: Have a look in your photo gallery, Nick.

You will get a nice surprise.



Thanks Max

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Hi John,
Another superb industrial build which adds yet more depth of character to Granby. Sorry for not noticing it earlier, but I've been pretty much out of it this week, but will slowly get back.

Sun at last though and I hope to sit out in the garden with some railway books tomorrow.

Best,

Bill

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Thanks Billl. I am sorry for the delay in responding to your kind comments and also for the lack of updates on this thread. I am in the middle (literally) of getting my eyes sorted. I now have 20/20 distance vision in my left eye ......this would have been great when I was shooting and sailing but not much help when modelling. Hopefully my right eye will be sorted mid April then I can get new glasses for reading/computor/modelling. In the interim, using my old glasses I can read and do broad brush modelling but computor work produces some interesting visual effects.....my apologies for numerous typos.



I really should have done a wrap on this project in my last post because the building itself  is complete





The finishing touch was supposed to be the chimney.

I downloaded the new chimney kit and actually built one...... its a distinct improvement on the the old model but
................................... its huge: :shock:


 



When I took it downstairs I realised that I had forgotten about the overhang in the Railway room :oops: :oops:





So for once I applied " less is more" on Granby........no chimney


At the end of a project I do like before and after shots

This was the start point in January



The objective being to provide a scenic block to the storage yard that worked through 90o covering the entrance to the room and the main view points within






Aesthetically, I think it may have looked more pleasing with one less floor.Having said that, the relationship between the milll and the surrounding terraced houses is exactly as I remember it.....if anything the mill was even more dominant.

The milll is only the first component of the scenic block. I will show how the block was completed in my layout thread next week (I hope)

I hope you enjoyed this thread and, if you havent already done so, feel encouraged to venture into the world of Scalescenes

Best wishes from Vancouver

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Thoroughly enjoyed the thread John - as ever, a masterpiece in step by step building and a masterpiece in the finished article.  As a scenic block, and as a model, it works perfectly.  Can you lift it off to access the storage roads ?

It's a pity about the chimney but as you say, it did look huge - but then I well remember their domination of the landscape as I drove over Windy Hill from the pretty side into the "mill lands" of Lancashire.  There were of course, mills and chimneys in Yorkshire but, for some reason, the Lancashire cotton mills were so much more "dark and satanic" - far more impressive to me than the architectural masterpieces like Salts Mill.  As you know, I'm a big fan of "proper" industrial architecture !!

The shot on the glass table of the chimney in place seems to show some interesting background scenery................I see there's a bottle all ready to christen it. :cheers

Your point about the size comparison between terraced houses and mills is very valid.  The mills were absolutely massive and dwarfed the tiny terraces.  Not only did they have more storeys than one could count, the height of each floor semed twice that of the terraced houses.  But maybe that's just my memory playing tricks.

I do hope you get your eyes sorted properly.  Mine are not what they used to be and I get terribly frustrated when I can't read anything without first looking for my glasses.

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Petermac wrote: Thoroughly enjoyed the thread John - as ever, a masterpiece in step by step building and a masterpiece in the finished article.  As a scenic block, and as a model, it works perfectly.

Thanks Peter.....thats very kind of you. Its an excellent kit....very easy to adapt......I would recommend it. Two caveats......you must use the specified card thickness .....any change will cause assembly issues ....the design process causes small deviations to accumulates. Secondly its not a starter kit.......if I were doing it again I would make a small single module unit just to familiarise myself  with the techniques John Wiffen has introduced.


Can you lift it off to access the storage roads ?

Absolutely.......previous experiences :twisted: :twisted: made that an essential.... I will post a shot in Granby.

It's a pity about the chimney but as you say, it did look huge - but then I well remember their domination of the landscape as I drove over Windy Hill from the pretty side into the "mill lands" of Lancashire.  There were of course, mills and chimneys in Yorkshire but, for some reason, the Lancashire cotton mills were so much more "dark and satanic" - far more impressive to me than the architectural masterpieces like Salts Mill.  As you know, I'm a big fan of "proper" industrial architecture !!

I was in a motor club (High Moor) in Oldham and we used to meet at a pub on the 'tops" . I will never forget my first sight of an absolute forest of chimneys  in the valleys below.......all long gone now I guess

The shot on the glass table of the chimney in place seems to show some interesting background scenery................I see there's a bottle all ready to christen it. :cheers

Chateau Plonk I am afraid......nothing like the stuff you enjoy. I normally crop out the screw cap collection ....couldnt for the chimney shot

Your point about the size comparison between terraced houses and mills is very valid.  The mills were absolutely massive and dwarfed the tiny terraces.  Not only did they have more storeys than one could count, the height of each floor semed twice that of the terraced houses.  But maybe that's just my memory playing tricks.

I think your memory is probably correct.....Doreen reckons a ceiling height of 15-20 feet. They would need the height because the machinery was all belt driven

I do hope you get your eyes sorted properly.  Mine are not what they used to be and I get terribly frustrated when I can't read anything without first looking for my glasses.

Thank you.......I wasnt thrilled at the idea of someone poking about with my eyes but its apparently the most  widely used  procedure here and in the UK.....the improved distance vision in my left eye is quite amazing.

Best wishes to you and Liz


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Hi John.   Excellent workmanship , as per usual I am a late entry to your thread, if I could emulate your skill with this kit? It would fit the bill to hide a bunch of cables, but, I won’t hold my breath. Best wishes.   Kevin

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Hi Kevin
The warehouse kit is perfect for concealing storage yards etc but, as I said above, its not a beginners kit. 

Not sure what experience you have with Scalescene? If you havent already done so I would recommend trying some of his starter kits to get used to some of the techniques he uses

 Best wishes

John

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Hi John.   Thank you .i have purchased ( and pasted to card ) a Viaduct kit, but alas I never built a suitable layout, where if I buy a Warehouse kit, I have some “ unsightly “ cables that by necessity are above baseboard level that require hiding from view.   Best wishes. Kevin


                 

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