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Rob Pulham
7mm Scale Modeller of the LNER


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As alluded to on my member introduction thread, amongst other things, I do quite a lot of scratchbuilding aided by the use of a Silhouette Cameo. This thread will illustrate what I have been up to and how I went about it.
For the first post please bear with me while I set the scene for my current projects.

Back at the beginning of October, I decided that I wanted some 1:43 scale cars as loads for wagons and looking at some of the suppliers I was quite astonished at how much some of the O Gauge whitemetal kits fetch. Whilst browsing eBay I chanced upon some Danbury Mint pewter cars that were in need of TLC I got the 3 cars below for £15 including delivery. A bit of soldering of wheels/axles and straightening of window frames later and I had a Rolls Royce Silver Ghost, a Jaguar SS100 and an MG TC ready for painting.



[/img]http://i1181.photobucket.com/albums/x437/Robpulham/Miscellaneous/IMG_1464_zpspkhbximk.jpg[/img]











Nothing at all to do with scratch building I hear you cry, as I say, bear with me.

Rob Pulham
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Then, fast forward a little bit to get to:








The Jag from the side looks like it's been in an accident that scrunched it up a little. Thankfully it doesn't look too bad from above which is where we will view it from once it's in it's final position.





Since these photos were taken, I have given the Jag and the MG wheels/radiators a wash of dilute black to create shadows and take away the shiny newness.

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Having painted up my cars I need something to carry them on and Open Carriage Trucks fit the bill as being a little more in keeping than machinery wagons or Lowmac's. 
A look through my trusty Historic Carriage volumes gave me examples of GNR and NER so I made start on a couple of GNR examples.

First the 21' version whose Diagram number I cannot recall and I left my book up north.



The J hangers/W Irons and axleboxes are spares from the Parkside LNER Horsebox which are available from Parkside by the sprue.


Followed by the earlier and shorter (18') Diagram 375







I have another 21 footer started too. All the hinges and details were drawing in Inkscape and cut on the Cameo.

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And then there were five... 

Although last week was a bust from a modelling perspective due to being ill. When I started to feel better I did get a bit of drawing and cutting done which allowed me to make a start on what I think are the last two open carriage trucks for now.

First I made up the body and basic underframe for the GER OCT that I had enquired about the origins of on the LNER forum and RMWeb





The plan is to finish this with an A Type container (which I have made start on drawing up in Inkscape).

Last but by no means least (because it's a bit of a beast at 34' 8") is a former NER 6 wheeled OCT. Apparently in 1917 these had their sides removed and bolsters added for the conveyance of Aeroplane parts.






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Hi Rob,
Going together very nicely, the advantage of 7mm is you can get that extra level of detail

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Those Silhouette Cameo cutters aren't too expensive, Rob.

Compared to a 3D printer which will do the same quality work.

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Hi Rob,

What thickness of styrene can that cookie cutter cut?

Nigel

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Thanks Aaron,
Hi Max,

I agree, although 3D printers are coming down. The downside is that there is a whole new learning curve to learn how to do it in 3D. I have tried to get to grips with it but much like previous attempts at 2D I really need somehting to give me the impetus to get on and do it which the Cameo gave me for 2D drawing. That and Inkscape is so much easier to learn (in my experience) than AutoCad/Turbo Cad and Draftsight packages that I have tried to get to grips with in the past (and failed miserably....).

Hi Nigel,

Although I haven't cut any myself the thickest I am aware of being cut through is 15 thou. I use 10 thou for the details like hinges etc. and multiple layers of 20 thou which I heavily score and then snap. For example the sides of the GER OCT are 3 layers of 20 thou. 

To put them together I have a sheet of plate glass (a shelf from a fridge that died) along the long edge I have stuck a strip of Aluminium (stuck with PVA). I also have some flat T squares from Eileens Emporium follow link - T Square which I clamp to the glass sheet using cheap clamps from the pound shop which gives me one or more right angled edges to but the layers up against while they are glued and the next layer positioned on top. I use Limonene as the solvent of choice these days and then once all the layers are stuck together I have a second shelf that I place over them to compress them and keep them flat until the solvent dries.
I have a couple of the 3 inch squares and a 4 inch version which because they are flat and easily clamped I use for all sorts of modelling applications.  I have a couple of small standard squares too but I don't find them quite as versatile.

For plain items like the sides floor of the GNR carriage trucks I just score and snap 40 or 60 thou without using the Cameo at all.

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Hi Rob,

Thanks. At that thickness I'm sort of tempted, as I could use CorelDraw for preparing the vector files, 10 thou' or less for the structures (black UV stable styrene), and decal rivets as required.  Slab sided freight cars with the sides and doorways cut to size (or passenger cars with the windows and doorways cut to size in the sides and ends) could be interesting.

Nigel


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Hi Nigel,
It's certainly addictive, in a good way. I really like making things.

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Previously I have built a few Parkside and Slaters wagon kit's but going back to the beginning of 2015 and before I got the Cameo I wanted to have a go at scratch building a wagon. 
I have a collection of drawings of various items of rolling stock and locos so I chose a Lime wagon as being a bit different (I had recently built a Slaters Salt wagon and liked the idea of another pitched roof wagon).

So I set to with an Olfa cutter and some sheet styrene.









The crown plates and washer plates were all cut by hand from either evergreen strip or sheets of 10 thou styrene and the underframe fittings cane out of the spares box. The hinges for the doors were the most difficult to cut four that looked remotely similar let alone identical near drove me to distraction.

You will note that the buffers are fixed not sprung. I had them in the spares box and at that point I didn't know how it would turn out so decided that if I ended up scrapping it then they were nothing lost.

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Further work on the Lime wagon brought me to this:












Getting all the strips the same width was a bit of a challenge but the investment in a "Northwestern Shortline Chopper II at least helped me get the lengths all accurate.

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That's a remarkable result Rob.  I have the Shortline and it certainly does come in handy.  I'm trying to work out how you did the bolt heads, wire or plastic?  I'm impressed at how you got them to line up so well.

John

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Looks like flat head pins or brass nails. Looks good though.

Nigel

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Those are some nice wagons! Well-done scratchbuilt wagons are always cool to see

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Hi Rob,

Not an area I know a lot about - what are the various plates on the sole bar of the wagon? This looks to be a pre-RCH wagon (from the Skinley drawings no less sez your blog).

I'm guessing the sequence (left to right) is registration plate, label clip, makers plate, plus of course any repair plates. I'm intrigued by that corner plate (normally a semi-circular plate) above the axle boxes - strengthening?

Are you going to add horse hooks?

Nigel




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Hi John,
They are stubbs of plastic into holes drilled into the wagon side. I then used a scrap of sheet with a hole drilled in it to pop over them as a filing guide to get them all the same length.

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BCDR wrote: Hi Rob,

Not an area I know a lot about - what are the various plates on the sole bar of the wagon? This looks to be a pre-RCH wagon (from the Skinley drawings no less sez your blog).

I'm guessing the sequence (left to right) is registration plate, label clip, makers plate, plus of course any repair plates. I'm intrigued by that corner plate (normally a semi-circular plate) above the axle boxes - strengthening?

Are you going to add horse hooks?

Nigel

Thanks Nigel,

I think that the corner plates on the sole bar are crown plates but angular instead of the more usual semi circular crown plates - they still have the three bolts which I assume bolt the curved top of the W Iron in place much as they would on the more standard variety.

I have added horse hooks they are just visible in the last close up photo - replacing the bolt head on the left hand leg of the angled crown plate. - I just followed the drawing adding the detail that was visible.

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Next I started to paint it and in the absence of a photo I followed the painting and transfer guide on the drawing.
I produced the transfers myself printing them onto white laser decal paper.









Once it was finished I was really pleased to be contacted by Paul Bartlett (HMRS Wagon Steward) who offered that although he didn't have a photo of the specific wagon he did have a photo of a wagon in Dowlow Lime livery and I had it spot on.

Note the solebar registration plate transfer was a spare from a Slaters sheet (I think).

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Now that's a cracker.  After I wrote my previous post I thought that the bolt heads were probably plastic, although drilling holes exactly in line and with accurate spacing must be difficult - I know I struggle.  Clever idea to use a filing gauge.

I do like your transfers.  I've made them before but with a cheap laser printer which tended to overheat the transfer sheet causing smears.  I now have a much better ink jet printer (HP 8270 Office Pro) but have yet to try making transfers with it.

John

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Thanks John,
In hindsight it's missing some detail on the headstocks but because I hand mixed the paint I am loath to add them now I know better because I doubt I could mix that colour of paint again to cover/touch them in.

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Still looks quite lovely. And is increasing my urge to get started on scratchbuilding some BR wagons of my own (even if it means extra-tall W-irons)

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Rob,

I hope you don't think I'm trying to be smug,
or trying to teach you to suck eggs, but

I always mix more than I need and store it in
an old, cleaned out tinlet, just in case!

On the other hand, repairs to wagons & vans
weren't always to 'main works' standards, incl.
paint match and finish, so I wouldn't be too
bothered if it didn't match perfectly, so long as
it looks like a proper 'original' repair.

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jcm@gwr wrote: Rob,

I hope you don't think I'm trying to be smug,
or trying to teach you to suck eggs, but

I always mix more than I need and store it in
an old, cleaned out tinlet, just in case!

On the other hand, repairs to wagons & vans
weren't always to 'main works' standards, incl.
paint match and finish, so I wouldn't be too
bothered if it didn't match perfectly, so long as
it looks like a proper 'original' repair.

Hi Jeff, 

That's probably a habit that I ought to get into especially when mixing non standard colours. Thinking about it as mentioned elsewhere my good lady is an artist so she could probably replicate the colour for me .

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Although jumping the gun a bit on my scratchbuilding journey I have been asked to post photos of the items that won prizes this year in the modelling competition at Guildex.
Starting off with the wagon that one third prize and a bit of background. I have built a couple of the Parkside kit's for the Outside framed Jubilee van but it turns out that these were the least numerous of the Jubilee vans. The NBR built wide planked versions and matchboard versions in much greater numbers.

I found a drawing and drew up sides and ends in Inkscape and when assembled and beading added from half round styrene strip I ended up with these:







From there it was an easy task to adapt the drawings to represent one of the later matchboard sided vans.





The underframe parts are spares obtained from Parkside from the Jubilee van kit.

As you can see I built two of each type.

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Due to the lack of transfers I decided to have a go at cutting some using the silhouette cutter to cut the letters from white transfer paper. I did this for the "Return to Singer" elements of the vans. I don't seem to have any un-weathered pictures so these are all post  at least some weathering.









Then we get to the competition entry, on page 43 of Tatlow's LNER Wagons volume 3 there is a superb photo of one of the matchboard vans post WWII put out to grass awaiting being broken up and I just had to try to replicate it.







A final shot of the finished wagon alongside the trophy.


Last edited on Wed Dec 21st, 2016 09:29 pm by Rob Pulham

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Rob Pulham wrote: Thanks John,
In hindsight it's missing some detail on the headstocks but because I hand mixed the paint I am loath to add them now I know better because I doubt I could mix that colour of paint again to cover/touch them in.

Hi Rob,

Repeat mixing is quite easy, just don't try and do it by volumes, especially drop-wise with pipettes. I always weigh each part using some ex-kitchen scales (accurate to 0.1 gm). Then you can note it down on the container with the final mix, or in the workshop notebook (we all have one, right?). Alternatively, always prepare a paint swatch on the base color you used, and store out of the light for future reference. And make a note of what colors were used. You can usually get pretty close on repeat mixing.

Nigel

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While reading up on various Midland wagons in Essery's Midland wagon tmes, I also noted a few pictures of a Midland Railway shunters truck similar to the ones that the GWR had. I wondered if the LNER or it's constituents had anything similar. 

An enquiry on the LNER forum revealed that the GCR has a couple and the NER had built one. No photos or drawings have emerged for the GCR examples but by fortunate coincidence (unbeknown to me at the time) I had a copy of the drawing for the NER example which is included in the Railway Snowploughs in the North East book by David and Claire Williamson. 

I had to use a bit of modellers license in this one because although the NER built it in 1902, in 1907 it was rebuilt into a double ended snowplough (hence it's inclusion in the book).

This is a true multimedia build:
The floor and step boards are coffee stirrers
The rest of the timber work is styrene strip
The handrail stanchions are brass split pins with piano wire rails
Brass handrail  knobs and nickel wire make up the lower handrails.
The hand brake column is a Slaters casting
The W Irons and V hangers are Slaters from the spares box as are the axle boxes but I did modify them with styrene.
The springs and hangers are scratch built from styrene strip and angle
Buffers are Haywood Railway and the couplings are Parkside.














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This is excellent Rob.  Your use of everyday materials is inspiring and the effect is very good.  I like the obscure prototype.

John

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Thanks John,
Ever since I bought the shortline my horizons have expanded materials wise.

As a small diversion these are some wagon loads that I did.

This was done using some snips before I bought the shortline. - As you can see the ends had a tendency to get crushed slightly.











This was done after I got the shortline.








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My next foray into scratch building was to be an ex NBR 4 plank dropside wagon.













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Another beauty, Rob.  :thumbs

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Thanks Max,
This is what it looks like with a bit of paint and weathering.

I tried it with a few different homemade loads before settling on one.







This last one was what won my entry the runner up prize at Guildex



Although it was part of a wider entry, feedback from the competition organiser (Nick Dunhill) said that it was this wagon that carried the day.

This is the rest of them




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I'm not surprised, Rob.  What was the load?  They look like glass bottles of something?

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Those loads look good Rob.  I expect you'll be looking into lashing them down.  I've seen pictures of lumber loads half sheeted and lashed.

Would those glass jars be filled with sulphuric acid - eek! :shock:

John

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Brossard wrote:
Would those glass jars be filled with sulphuric acid - eek! :shock:

John

Quite possibly John, elf and safety didn't feature in those days.

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While taking photos yesterday I completely forgot the LNER Container. I managed to get the body painted a couple of weeks ago but I wasn't happy with the colour so I mixed some more. While I had the transfers out I applied some. The photo that I am working from has the container on an ex GER OCT which was before dedicated container wagons were produced. On that basis I am going to leave the paint work fairly pristine although I will no doubt weather the OCT when I get that far.

To avoid putting the cart before the horse I have included some photos of it before painting too.












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Rob Pulham wrote: Brossard wrote:
Would those glass jars be filled with sulphuric acid - eek! :shock:

John

Quite possibly John, elf and safety didn't feature in those days.

My mum had a story from the Great War where her mum worked in a chemical factory.  Some poor sod fell into a vat of acid - all they found was his wellies.

John

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Brossard wrote: Rob Pulham wrote: Brossard wrote:
Would those glass jars be filled with sulphuric acid - eek! :shock:

John

Quite possibly John, elf and safety didn't feature in those days.

My mum had a story from the Great War where her mum worked in a chemical factory.  Some poor sod fell into a vat of acid - all they found was his wellies.

John

I remember my 1970's Telecom days when we installed new  batteries in the country telephone exchanges & had to fill them up with acid - clothing & rubber gloves & masks....

Now outside of that, your models Rob are excellent :thumbs

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Sol wrote:
Now outside of that, your models Rob are excellent :thumbs

Many thanks for the kind words Ron

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Another one rolled off the bench today, just for those who thought that I had forsaken the Cameo.

The tar tank now has all it's underpinnings and just needs weathering to complete.

I am particularly pleased with how this one turned out because it was really just an experiment that wasn't meant to go further than seeing if I could make the riveted tank. Which in turn was a trial for creating cracked tar spillage....
















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That's lovely, Rob.

I'm interested as to how they kept the tar as a liquid back in the day.  Today in Oz, we have LPG burners on our tar trucks.

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MaxSouthOz wrote: That's lovely, Rob.

I'm interested as to how they kept the tar as a liquid back in the day.  Today in Oz, we have LPG burners on our tar trucks.

Funny you should say that,  there has been quite a discussion about it on RMweb and although I haven't read the many arguments in depth I think that the conclusions were that coal tar was a lot more liquid than the tar that we have today.

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Think it's coal tar.

http://mike.da2c.org/igg/rail/12-linind/tardis.htm

Scroll down near the end, Butler's tar tank.


Ed

Last edited on Sat Apr 15th, 2017 02:03 pm by Ed

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Interesting.

Does coal tar have the same uses as what ever we have today?

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Dunno Max, just remember seeing that type of wagon on the 'Goods & Not So Goods' site.

We don't mine much coal and haven't used coal gas since North Sea  gas was introduced in the 1960s, so I assume a lot of things that were made as a bi-product are now petroleum based, soap maybe.

Someone on here must know a bit about it.


Ed






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For anyone who is interested, I will be doing an InkScape/Silhouette Cutter demo at the Stainmore Railway Model railway exhibition on the 24/25th of June at Kirkby Stephen East Railway station. A bonus is that admission is free too.

Rob Pulham
7mm Scale Modeller of the LNER


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In between building the Kirk coaches I have also been assembling the other exNBR bogie CCT. This one will be finished in LNER livery for my own stock.

In NBR and LNER days the side panels were all half beaded this has been added using 0.8mm half round Plastruct strip.



Although I will be making the sole bars from plastruct strip they are too long to make it out of one length so it will need to be joined. 

In order that this isn't visible on the finished model I plan to draw up and cut some 10 thou overlays. Which I plan to rivet in the same manner as the tar tank. This is in the hope that it will save me from drilling, cutting and inserting the many stubs of rod that would otherwise make up the multitude of bolt/rivet heads visible on the sole bars.

Brossard
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Rob, you could use the Archer rivet/bolt transfers.  These have resin blobs on transfer film and look very good.

http://www.archertransfers.com/SurfaceDetailsMain.html

John

Rob Pulham
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Thanks John,
I must have a bit of a blind spot where Archers transfers are concerned because despite having been aware of them for a good number of years I have never even thought of giving them a try

BCDR
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Hi Rob,

Decal rivets - highly recommended.

Nigel

Rob Pulham
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Hi All,

Just a reminder to anyone in the vicinity that I will be demoing Inkscape and Silhouette Cutting at the Stainmore Railway in Kirkby Stephen this coming weekend and I look forward to seeing and having a natter with any one who pays a visit.

Rob Pulham
7mm Scale Modeller of the LNER


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Well I am back from a successful weekend demoing the Silhouette cutter. 
It was well received with lot's of interest from both people who have a machine but have done very little with it and  those that have never seen or heard of them.

It must have been seen as a success because I have been asked to do another demo next year on Loco building.

Rob Pulham
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A short while ago I thought that I had posted photo's of a Model T tanker truck that I picked up for a pound but I can't find it now. 

In between other modelling projects I have resprayed it into LNER blue and added some transfers and a light waft of weathering.









I just need to glaze it now.

Brossard
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A charming model Rob, well done.  :cheers

John

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That's very nice, Rob. 

Ed
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Looks great Rob and only £1 :thumbs


Ed

Rob Pulham
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Thanks Gents,
One of my better investments I think. :thumbs

Rob Pulham
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In between refitting seats to the Gresley all 3rd I glazed and weathered a couple  of my £1 bargain buys.

 
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[size=First is a 1927 Talbot Van,  I am not sure that I have posted this one before. When I got it, it was in a very toy like yellow livery with red writing for a bakery.  What I had in mind was a second 'umpteenth' hand vehicle that had been hand painted with ex military khaki and subsequently neglected.]
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[size=I reasoned that the LNER would keep theirs in better condition.]

Rob Pulham
7mm Scale Modeller of the LNER


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A while ago you may recall my building of a couple of LMS vans, an LNER 12 ton van and an ex NBR coke wagon? Well I finally made a start on weathering them. There is still work to do but I am pleased with where 3 sessions with the airbrush have got me to so far.


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Brossard
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Nice to see these Rob.  I always start with my airbrush (earth and black) and finish with powders.  It's good to see how others tackle this subject - very much in the eye of the beholder I think.

We're told to take our weathering cues from photos.  All well and good when there are colour pictures.  Not so much in the era of B&W.

John

Rob Pulham
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Thanks John,
These were done so far using varying mixtures of Vallejo game colours Blue Grey, leather and earth brown. I started with Blue grey and leather and then moved on to blue grey and earth.

I don't possess any coloured powders but I have used talc to good effect previously.

Brossard
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Modelling powders can be expensive and I do have several packs.  However, I got two goodly sized bottles of powdered paint pigment - umber and black - from the art store several years ago.  These are not dear.

John

Rob Pulham
7mm Scale Modeller of the LNER


Joined: Fri Dec 9th, 2016
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Hi John,
I will have a look for the powder paint, I recall using it all the time at school. So long ago though...


                 

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