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Brossard
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So, today I had a meeting with myself and decided that I couldn't stand it any longer, I had to do some 7mm work.  I noticed that over the last while my enthusiasm for 4mm was waning and figured a change was in order.

This evening I ordered a LNER/BR brake van from Slaters and from Parkside Dundas a LNER Cattle wagon, goods van and PO wagon.

I wanted to start the kit I do have which is a PD LNER 20T brake van E64.  These were built in the 30s so by the 60s they were nearing the end of their life.

I've made some progress this evening by drilling the sides for handrails.  Dimples are helpfully provided so that was foolproof.

I've fixed the solebars and W irons:



Being me of course I want to make the van sprung so I got myself some sprung bearing carriers by Bill Bedford.  These can be had at Eileen's Emporium.  The bearing carrier is attached to length of steel wire (~0.10mm).  This is free to move up and down in the carrier holder.  I need to determine the position relative to the W irons to make sure the bearing has travel around the centerline.

More tomorrow.
                        
John                   To visit John's 7mm coach workbench  go         HERE 

                          To visit John's 7mm Buildings workbench go      HERE                                          ✓    B
                                                                               
                          To visit John's 7mm Layout thread go                 HERE 

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This morning I put the sides and ends in the paintshop for grey primer.  I want to do the interior so that needs to be painted before assembly.  Glazing can only be put in after paint.

I also worked on the underframe.  After futzing about with various thicknesses of shim, I finally settled on 0.060" for the bearing carriers.  I used contact cement to fix the carrier to the shim.  The height seems about right but I won't know for sure until I get further into the build and I can see the buffer height.



From the drawing I guesstimated where the neutral ride height should be and marked the plastic W iron with pencil which you can just see.  The spring is pushing the bearing beyond that at the moment but when the van is weighted things should be right.

I was a tad concerned that the thickness of the brass carrier holder would prevent the wheels from going into the bearing, but all is good.

John

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Work continued this afternoon.



You can see that the wheels have been chemically blackened using the stuff for brass (Carrs) from C&L.

Axleboxes have been fixed and I'm pleased to say I avoiding gluing everything solid.

You can also see the subframe.  I had to cut notches on the crosspieces to clear the bearing carriers.

Another shot:



I also tackled the roof:



Rainstrips are 0.020" plastic rod.  Run this between thumb and forefinger to impart a curve.  I did make a bit of a mess but this should rub out with a fiber pen.  When doing these adjust them with metal tools.  It is easy to get a fingermark in the wet glue which is difficult to remove.

I positioned the ventilators by plotting the location from the drawing supplied - I'm not sure they're absolutely right.

At least the position of the stovepipe is obvious.

John

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Yesterday I worked on the brake gear.  It was quite a job to get my head around how this goes and I did make a booboo which fortunately I was able to correct.



I've only rigged the outer brakes.  This because to complete the rigging the wheels have to installed and there is a pull rod which prevents the wheels from being removed afterwards.  I've primed the underframe and will paint it black next.

The outer yokes are part #25 on the drawing.  There is a swing link that I haven't glued yet which will connect to the inner yoke #24 (not shown).  Part #61 is actually brass wire that will run from the actuator (on the right side of the underframe).

John

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I've got the underframe in the paint shop and the black is drying.

I turned my attention to the stepboards:



These are supplied in the kit.  They are of course plastic.  The black sprue contains the hangers among other things.

Anyone who has built a plastic brake van kit will know that the plastic stepboards are very fragile.  I have a PD model with tragically broken stepboards.  These are difficult to repair.

So, I though I'd be proactive and replace the plastic parts with metal.  Here's what I did:



The hangers are 0.020" brass wire.  I used a plastic hanger as master and made a wooden jig with holes to position the legs accurately.  I soldered two lengths of wire, one for each leg.  I then trimmed the legs and bent the assembly to mimic the plastic hanger.  I marked the pliers with the location for the bends so they're all close to being the same.  When I come to assemble this lot, I'll see how well I did.

The stepboards are brass strip.  By a stroke of good luck I had a couple of lengths of exactly the right width.  I made the rear edge by soldering 0.032" wire on.  The secret to doing this is to tack in several places first getting the wire aligned with the back of the step.  I then went back and filled in the back with solder, always trying to do that at different places.  My great fear when doing this is that I'll desolder everything - that didn't happen.  I did use 188C solder, maybe that helped.  Finally I applied solder to the front of the wire to hide that its wire.  This was cleaned up with curved Exacto blade, file and fiberglass pen.

John

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They look gorgeous, John.  :thumbs

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Thanks Max.

There's a bit more progress:





Rigging complete.You can see how the inner yokes connect to the top of the swing links.  The brass pull rod connect to the bottom of the swing links.  You can also see that the wheels won't come out now.

I do have one beef.  The instructions are very vague on how the crank is supposed to connect to the handbrake wheel.  I passed some wire from the main crank through the subframe to another crank (you can just make it out in the top picture) which I believe is below the handbrake wheel in the cabin.  Should have bought the drawing I guess.

I can finish painting now.

John

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You may have been wondering where the body is on this build.  Well, I've been constructing and interior and painting same:



The side on the left has a half length bench seat and partition.  The stove will go the left of the partition.

The side on the right has a full length bench seat.

The lower colour that I chose is Wisconsin Central Maroon.  In pictures the lower half is red.

The top half is Aged White.  Before assembling I will streak these with weathering powders to give it a lived in look.

John

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I was unhappy about the rigging so I threw out a call for info to RMWeb.  I got a response this morning and was emailed a drawing of a similar van that answered all my questions.  I've re-done the rigging:



Almost embarassingly simple.  The instructions could have been done better.There's a double crank just below the I beam.  The left end is connected to the handbrake wheel in the cabin.  The right end drives the main crank.  I'll touch up the paint next.

John

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I assembled the step boards this evening:



I am amazed and pleased at how well these turned out.  I did have to tweak things here and there but everything is quite straight.  My only disappointment is that the hangers are not flat as they should be.  I did try to solder some 1mm PB strip to the hangers between the steps but couldn't get any access.  Perhaps next time I'll do better.  I do have a Slaters Dia 61 brake van coming.
 
I wanted to see how things look with the body loosely fitted:



Things are a bit of a mess and I have ordered some BR grey paint which should arrive in a day or so.
 
Assembly should be plain sailing now.
 
John

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coming on nicely now,looks good to me
:thumbs ;-) :cool:
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It's beena while since I updated this thread.  Progress has been slow but steady.  I finally ran out of parts to fit today so I suppose the van must be considered nearly finished:



Couplings are installed and buffer shanks are in.  I fitted the handrails and lamp brackets today.

Next step is to touch up the paint - it has got knocked about with handling and fettling.

John

Last edited on Tue Oct 18th, 2016 02:16 am by Brossard

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Last week I got some more goodies:



Oooh yum!

John

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I think for my next project, I'll do the PO wagon.  After the fairly complex brake this should be quite simple.



It is complete with wheels, bearings, buffers and couplings.

I will add the Bill Bedford sprung W irons.  I like these and the wagon runs more convincingly when sprung.

John

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In a fit of productivity I started the PO wagon kit.

First I wanted to treat the wheels and couplings:



These were chemically blackened:



After rubbing the excess deposit of with a tissue, the parts attain an attractive patina.  The bottle says "for brass" but it works on NS and steel.  It won't work on Aluminum I believe.

Next I gave some thought to the insides:



These are well detailed and should be unpainted wood.  After 40 years the wood would be distressed so I had a look at what Martyn Welch had to say in his book "The Art of Weathering".

Before painting, I rubbed the insides with coarse sandpaper to try to get a grain effect.

I've done the painting and will continue the process tomorrow.

I also made up the bearing carriers:



You can see the bearing carrier is attached to a steel wire which is suspended between the ends of the W iron.

John

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Very nice John.
They look easier to work with and not too expensive to build....

... and yes... I ... will ... resist...  :shock:


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Whatever you do, it pays to take as much care as you can.  Don't rush and try to think ahead especially, as with the brake van, the interior needs doing.  I tend to keep a paint plan in my head and try to anticipate whether further assembly can be done or if some painting needs doing first.

I was looking at a list of October 00 releases from Bachmann and was struck at how much some of the stuff was.  I thought to myself that O gauge stock and kits are looking to be priced quite reasonably in comparison.

John

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I spent some time this morning doing, among other things, the inside planking.  Last night I started with light grey, dark earth and black.  This was all acrylic and applied with the same brush while each coat was still wet.

This am, I got out some similar Humbrol enamel colours and drybrushed.  I'm lousy at drybrushing and it came out darker than I thought it should.  I then spent a lot of time with powders of various hues to try to give the surfaces the look of a wagon that has been carrying coal around for nearly 50 years.



It's all very subjective but I think once it's together it'll look OK.  I may yet load it up or perhaps make a removable load.

The decorated sides will come in for severe distressing at some point.

John

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Brossard wrote: The bottle says "for brass" but it works on NS and steel.  It won't work on Aluminum I believe.
 
Hi John,

Nickel silver is a copper alloy, brass is copper/zinc, nickel silver is brass plus nickel. Selenium-copper based cold blackening works with ferrous metal including steel, copper-containing alloys, silver solder (which contains copper) but not stainless steel (which contains chromium). Blackening aluminum is possible, but as with all things aluminum needs a veritable witches-brew of chemicals to get rid of that oxide coating.

The following is a good primer on blackening solutions.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&ved=0ahUKEwjP_-y73OfPAhUKWh4KHWaoDEAQFggcMAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fmodelshipworldforum.com%2Fresources%2Ffurniture%2FMetalBlackening.pdf&usg=AFQjCNFuyWG-UgsXuIlHPlZGr3dxuLVJ5g&sig2=mqojN1pjB7hqV6fTb3ntqg&bvm=bv.135974163,d.dmo&cad=rja

Nigel

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Always good to know some background on these metal processes.  I only know that chemical blackening makes metal look good.

Over the last couple of days, I brought the brake van nearer to completion:



Now the buffers are installed.  With the guides already installed, it was a fiddle to get the nut on the buffer spindle.  I'll pre-assemble the buffer and buffer guide next time.

I didn't like my veranda guard rails so I did them again.  I think they're better now.

Paint touch up has been done, and by the magic of photography I see I missed a spot.

The PO construction is nearly done:



Not unlike a 4mm wagon kit really just that much more detail.  The door hinge at the upper left was made from brass tube and PB strip.  The kit supplies plastic rod and very thin plastic strip.  After two attempts to wrap the rod with strip and breaking it both times I went for a more robust option.  I actually have a book on PO wagons and that was helpful in guiding me where the hinge should go.  Some wagons had the hinge above the door as seen (and broken) on a lot of Bachmann wagons.

John

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While perusing Hatton's this wagon caught my eye (I'm going to have get drops for that):



Really quite good to my thinking, above the sole bars anyway.  I don't like that the brakes are mile away from the wheels and the brake gear seems a bit wimbly.

Side doors really do open and the fit is very good - you can't easily see the join can you?

Buffers and couplings are sprung.

I've ordered some Bill Bedford kits from Eileen's Emporium - sprung W irons and brake gear.  When fitted this wagon will look super.

John

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The parts I need to upgrade the Dapol wagon arrived.  I spent some time today taking the thing apart.  Flippin' 'eck, the glue Dapol used to secure the W iron/brakegear moulding is strong!  I ended up using a cutting wheel to remove material around the moulding until I had enough leverage to wrench it off.  Not for the faint hearted this.



The underside of the wagon body looks a proper mess but it'll tidy up as we proceed.  Note the solebar overlays.



The two Bill Bedford kits required for the upgrade.  At top are the sprung W irons - I've discussed these before.

At bottom is the brake gear fret.

The model W irons look quite thick - I might just chop them up for the springs and axle boxes.

John

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Now that I have the new layout benchwork done and waiting for points, I spent some time today on the Dapol PO wagon.



I assembled the Bill Bedford W irons and blackened them.

The white strips on the floor of the wagon are 0.060" plastic strip which should bring the W irons to the correct height (it did on my previous two wagons).

In looking through a Slater's kit for a standard BR van, I found that there was a sprue for manual brakes and one for clasp brakes (no yokes etc. but I can make these) so I robbed the W irons and chopped them up for the springs and axle boxes.

I discovered why the wheels have so much side to side slop, the axles are 2mm shorter than Slater's wheels.  Must think about that, the slop really is unacceptable to me.

John

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State of play with my Dapol wagon:



Fortunately I had my Parkside wagon to compare to.  You can see I packed the rear of the solebars to push the W irons inwards.  The axles engage the bearings now.  I still have to install the brake lever, but I think I'll paint first.

John

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I'm about to bring my brake van to completion:



These shots illustrate the completed interior, although my friend complained that there was no bucket or brush. :roll:

It's difficult to see, but there is a stove.

I can finally stick the roof on, after which no-one will be able to see all this - tccch!

John

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I finished my Dapol PO wagon:



Main improvements are that the brakes are properly close to the wheels, there is no ridiculous side play and wheels are sprung.  I also replaced the ring retainer for the coupling spring with a split pin.

Eventually this wagon will be depicted in "end of life" condition as most were in 1962.

I don't think I'll buy another RTR PO wagon from Dapol.  Lionheart PO wagons look to be a lot better.  Anyway, I've enough wagon kits to keep me busy for some time.

John

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That looks really nice, John.  :thumbs

Are the chains the right scale?  I'm always over scale with chains.  :roll:

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Thanks Max.  Y'know, I don't know if the links are right, they look right to my eye.  I know in 4mm, they always seemed overscale.  The compromise required to make using 3 link a practical proposition (although it never was for me).

John

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The last thing I did on my brake was to add safety loops under the brake yokes.  These are not provided in the kit, nor is there mention of them.  I made them from 0.032" brass wire, chemically blackened:



I think I can call construction complete.  I will be weathering this at some point.

John

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certainly looks complete to me, smart
:thumbs ;-) :cool:
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My next kit is a Slaters BR Standard Van.  My friend is building the same kit so I want to be able to see what he's complaining about.  Mind you my plan is to build this in the slightly less common 8 clasp brake version.

The kit comes provisioned for the 4 brake version but does include a fret with clasp brakes and axle guards.

Being me, I opted to use Slaters sprung W irons and made these up:



All really self explanatory.  Whenever you're dealing with small springs things do get fiddly.  To Slaters credit there are a load of spare springs in the packet. :Happy

The half etches were initially a mystery to me and I only just twigged that the W irons are cranked slightly outwards using the half etches as bend guides. :roll:

So, on to the van.  The instructions don't have much text and there isn't a step by step guide.  I suppose there's an assumption that the builder has some experience and some familiarity with the prototype.

I found a lot of great photos of this van here:  http://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/paulbartlettsrailwaywagons  :doublethumb

Therefore I just put the van together, floor, solebars, sides and ends - not rocket science:



I blackened the W irons.

Underneath:



The floor ribs are stuck on and embellished with plastic strip to make them channel.  The brass wire is the vacuum pipe.  I made holding brackets from wire and secured everything with CA.

John


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Nice touches, John.   :cool:

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I've been steadily working on the van:



Wheels and clasp brakes installed.  You can see the coil springs above the axle boxes.  Very smooth running.

Fast forward a few days and the wagon is nearly finished:



I have the axleboxes and springs on.  Brake gear is also installed - what a faff!  There are lost wax door catches and brackets on the solebar.  Still have the brake levers to do.



Here's a view of the underframe showing brake gear.  It took a bit of brain power to figure out but I think it makes mechanical sense.  The white bits are handmade with plastic strip, copied from a Parkside kit with a similar arrangement.  There's a pipe connected the vacuum cylinder to the vac pipe.

Note also the safety loops around the pull rods and yokes.

I am waiting for Oleo buffers so that will take a week or so.

John

Last edited on Wed Nov 23rd, 2016 08:50 pm by Brossard

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After I took the pictures in the previous post I was disgusted to discover, when I scrutinized photos of the clasp brake version of the van, that I had it all wrong.

I spent the last while figuring out how to represent the prototype and here's what I came up with:





You can see that each side is quite different.  The side opposite the vac cylinder at top, has an additional hanger for the brake lever to pivot on.  Brakes are actuated by the brackets connected to the lever and brake rod.

On the vac cylinder side, The V hanger has a hole midway up to act as brake lever pivot.  The brake lever is extended and connected to brackets.

This arrangement means that the direction of pull for manual braking is correct.

You'll also notice that the body has been primed and the underframe painted black.

John

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My Oleo buffers arrived yesterday so I spent some time detailing the van ends:



I got the buffers from Invertrain, they are made by Haywood Models.  

The vacuum pipe is lost wax and is inserted into a hole under the buffer beam.  Note to wagon kit builders and bashers, vac pipes go UNDER the buffer beam.

The hose is a fine wound metal, don't know what it is, I wanted to blacken it but my solutions won't touch it.

The connector is also lost wax.

There's a bracket with a connector on the buffer beam just peeping out behind the LH buffer.  The vacuum hose would get connected to this to maintain vacuum if the van was at the end of a train.

Lastly, there is a lamp bracket, again for use if the van is the last vehicle in a train.

Still to fit is the screw link coupling after paint.

I think we're done and painting is next.

John

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Brossard wrote: My Oleo buffers arrived yesterday so I spent some time detailing the van ends:







I got the buffers from Invertrain, they are made by Haywood Models.  



The vacuum pipe is lost wax and is inserted into a hole under the buffer beam.  Note to wagon kit builders and bashers, vac pipes go UNDER the buffer beam.



The hose is a fine wound metal, don't know what it is, I wanted to blacken it but my solutions won't touch it.



The connector is also lost wax.



There's a bracket with a connector on the buffer beam just peeping out behind the LH buffer.  The vacuum hose would get connected to this to maintain vacuum if the van was at the end of a train.



Lastly, there is a lamp bracket, again for use if the van is the last vehicle in a train.



Still to fit is the screw link coupling after paint.



I think we're done and painting is next.



John


With respect to the vacuum pipe, have you thought about using a black permanent marker?
Looking good so far!

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Still watching.

Nice detail, John.  :thumbs

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LOL Jeff, exactly what I have done.  Paint is too thick. 

I think the hose connector might join to an adjacent wagon hose and stay by spring force - we'll see.  There are also tiny magnets that could be glued to the connector.

I really like that you get so much more detail in this scale Max.

John

Last edited on Sun Dec 11th, 2016 12:57 am by Brossard

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India ink works well.

Nigel

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I have a marker but no India ink.  I need to get some so I can try weathering techniques with it.

John

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Hi John,
By remarkable coincidence J&J Charlesworth was the colliery in the village that I live (Stanley in Wakefield) and I plan to finish a few open wagons that I have on the go in the Charlesworth livery. 
What I didn't know until seeing your example, was that Parkside do them and digging a little further revealed that  Powsides do different sets of J&J Charlesworth transfers too. I had thought that I would have to either comission some or do them myself - the Cameo cuts out letters from white transfer paper with ease. The downside is having to line each letter up individually.

Regards Rob

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I am delighted to hear from you Rob and it is indeed a coincidence about the wagon.  I chose it for no particular reason.  I just ordered a Lionheart PO wagon (and a Berry Wiggins tank) because I've heard good things about them - it'll be better than the Dapol wagon.

I will be watching your Charlesworth wagon rake with interest.

My plan for these is to distress them to be in end of life condition around 1962.

I've had to letter loads of coaches and wagons in 4mm using HMRS transfers, a great pain indeed.

John

Last edited on Mon Dec 12th, 2016 01:50 am by Brossard

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Hi John,

I hear you on the press fix, I must confess that I prefer methifx because at least they are easily adjustable to get in position. I have also found that you don't need meths you can use Micro Sol/Micro Set instead both preparing the surface and releasing them from the backing at the same time.

These were cut on the Cameo from waterslide laser paper and done a letter at a time - the first side took 3, half hour sessions to do and as if my magic the second side was complete in 15 minutes start to finish. I hope that the next ones I do will be a bit easier because the deal paper was a couple of years or so old and was a bit brittle.

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Lovely Rob, sometimes the transfer process seems to take forever and other times it just clicks.

I've always avoided Methfix because I'm unsure of the solution needed, it's not methylated spirits -- I forget the name.  Thanks for the tip about Microsol - that I have.  I have a couple of sheets of 7mm HMRS Pressfix BR transfer sheets.

John

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I've been thinking about vacuum pipes and had a brain fart about joining them together.  I did a search and found a supplier of really tiny (1/16" x 1/32"/ ~1.5mm x .75mm) disc magnets.  I know these things have been discussed before and thought I'd pass on the name of the supplier for people in North America: 

https://www.kjmagnetics.com/products.asp?cat=1

I did a search for suppliers in Canada but the smallest dia. I could find was 1/8"(~3mm), far too large.

Anyway the plan is to glue magnets to the end of the vacuum hose and they should stay together until uncoupled wagons pull them apart.  They're not dear so I think worth a try.

John

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The postman dropped off two packages today and didn't even demand ransom.

First I got the magnets, 200 of them:



Then I got two Lionheart RTR wagons:



This is beautifully done and is quite heavy.  I had to chock a wheel to stop it rolling off the track.



This PO wagon is a world away from the Dapol wagon I discussed earlier, I do like it.

Sadly I don't have any excuse to tear these apart.

John

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Hi John,

Those magnet couplers are available in HO, somewhere in BC. Used as airlines if memory serves. Yup. HO Magnalock brake lines.

Nigel

Edit: Pacific Western Rail Systems is the suppler.

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Yes Nigel, I did vaguely recall that there is a product that uses a similar idea.  Nothing new under the sun.

John

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I've been plodding away on my wagon kits:



This is the BR Std van, painted in my version of bauxite and complete with the exception of lettering. 



The LNER van.  This is Parkside and comes with some nasty whitemetal vacuum standpipes.  I've ordered some lost wax pipes from Slaters.  Other than that and lettering the van is done.

I started a new project, Parksides LNER long wheelbase Large Cattle Van.  Early days yet:



I assembled the floor, sub floor, solebars and axleguards.  The sprung bearing carriers have also been installed.  The sides have been assembled.  Instead of plastic wire supplied I used 0.45 mm NS wire in the openings.

I decided that I needed to pay some attention to the interior as it can be seen.  I started with light grey primer and followed up with white.  (brushpainting white is very difficult I find, so I usually use a rattle can).  This morning I got out the airbrush and gave the surfaces coats of dirt and black.  I followed this with umber and black powder steaks.  I've no idea what these things looked like in 1962 but they probably weren't terribly clean.

There are two partitions.  Apparently while most railways built small, medium and large cattle vans, LNER only made large ones.  The partitions could be placed at one end to make the interior small or medium (not clear to me why that would be important).  The other thing is that a compartment could be partitioned off to house one animal, a bull perhaps?

John

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Small, medium and large was also the flavour of GWR cattle wagons John,



Bill

Edit:by virtue of the partitioning system, so well described by Rob below. Please excuse my senior moment, as brain not in use today it seems! 


Last edited on Fri Dec 23rd, 2016 08:32 pm by Longchap

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Hi John,

As I understand it, although the LNER built one sized wagon they sold space as small medium and large so the partition was to make the space smaller when less than a full wagon was hired.

The GWR did something similar but apparently they had a few unscrupulous farmers who paid for small or medium space but then when the wagon was loaded them sneaked back to move the partition to give the cattle more room than they had paid for. The GWR came up with a locking mechanism that linked to the opening top doors which were very visible when opened to prevent this.

One question though,  is your cattle wagon fitted or unfitted? I ask because recent conversation on the LNER forum seems to have reached the consensus that virtually none of the unfitted LNER cattle wagons made it to BR service.

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Thanks for that Rob, useful bit of context wrt to partitions.

The kit comes as vacuum fitted with clasp brakes.   Not surprising that unfitted didn't make the cut in BR service - these would need to move at passenger train speed and could even be attached to a passenger train.  The kit illustrates the van fitted with a  steam pipe which I assume is through and for attachment to a coach behind the van.   I do have Geoff Kents "4mm Wagons" which has some info on these - must review.

John

Last edited on Fri Dec 23rd, 2016 06:48 pm by Brossard

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I've been pottering away at the cattle van in between making turnouts.  Here's where we are:



It is essentially done with just a few bits and bobs to add, notably buffers and couplings.



Underneath the brake gear is assembled.  There is a line from the vac cyclinder soldered to the vacuum pipe.  The other pipe is the through steam pipe for coach heating.  Levers need to be added, as do the safety loops but that's for after painting.

John

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Cattle van construction is now complete:



End details are not supplied with the kit.

Screw coupling is Dapol

Vacuum pipes are Slaters

Steam pipes are Invertrain.



Transfers next.

John

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Hi John,
How are you finding the Dapol Screw couplings? They seem very reasonable at £18 for five sets but I had heard that they were a bit short? 

for a while I have been using the Premier Components version which were 3 sets for £15 but when I got some at Telford they had gone up to £16 for 3 sets.

I fancy trying the Dapol ones when I need some more but would welcome comment on the length - If I remember correctly the person who mentioned them being small had them fitted to a large diesel with lots of pipes on the ends so they may have reduced the available space

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Interesting point about the couplings Rob.  As I haven't anywhere to run these yet I haven't assessed their running qualities.  These don't "work" but look pretty good to my eye.  In life of course, the length would be adjusted so that the buffers touch.  Next chance I get, I'll couple some wagons and take a picture.

I was thinking of changing the couplings on my J50 to screw link since I want it doing passenger service.  For that I was going to get a working set from Slaters - M7023.  I reckon I'll need to add steam pipes too.

Unfortunately Premier don't do credit card, so they're not going to make my supplier list - pity.

Cheers

John


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I decided to have ago at fitting the tiny magnets to the ends of the vacuum hoses.  Quite a fiddle.  I also did a trial coupling since Rob raised the question of Dapol coupling length:



The magnets do join the hoses but not terribly convincingly.  Coupling length seems fine.



The BR van has Oleo buffers which a re abit longer than standard, again the coupling length seems OK.

John

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Brilliant,  thanks for that John,

I will line up an order from Hattons for some, hopefully before I run out of those from Premier.

Regarding Premier,  He is one of the old school in that you place an order,  he sends it along with an invoice and then you pay (by cheque). Very trusting in this day and age.

Last edited on Sun Jan 8th, 2017 02:09 pm by Rob Pulham

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Glad to have answered your question Rob.  Yes, sending goods first and then asking for payment is a rarity these days.  UK Cheque payment doesn't work for me though.

John

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Hi Rob.
You mentioned Stanley in your post where I once did a gig in a pub there about 15 years ago. It was a Shadows tribute where I stood in for Hank Marvin which went down a storm. I opened with 'Apache' and finished on ' Cavatina' to great beer soaked applause - even when I hit the occasional bum note ! ( Well you try F.B.I. after ten pints ! )

Allan.

Last edited on Mon Jan 9th, 2017 04:05 pm by allan downes

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Hi Allan,
What a small world,  we lived in Stanley 15 years ago - we moved in in 1999.

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Alright enough with the reminiscing, back to work.

Over the last several days I've been working on getting my PO wagons into their "end of life" condition not quite "condemned".

Here we go:





Note the replaced planks and drop door.  This wagon doesn't have bottom doors.







More replacement planks.



The process is a lengthy one and quite exhausting.

First, I used a fiberglass pen to fade the lettering and body colour.  Next I masked the bodies and sprayed black patches for the number, bottom door indicator and tare.  For the Parkside Charlesworth wagon this was a mistake because, to my horror, when I removed the masking tape, much of the lettering and paint came with it - a poor do.

I used aged concrete for the natural wood planks.

If anyone s moved to take this job on, get yourself some black patch transfers - far easier.

In preparation for transfers, I sprayed a coat of gloss varnish on the bodies.

Next I applied P numbers, vee and Tare using Fox transfers.

The white stripe denoting end door was very difficult and I eventually gave up trying to get the transfer to work.  I painted it instead which involved a massive amount of masking tape.  I did have some success with a paint pen, but mine is old and blobby.

After all this was dry, I sprayed on some flat varnish.

The fun stuff next.  Using my airbrush I sprayed on a light coat of dirt.  I covered the underneath and solebars and a short way up the body.  This was followed by a light coat of black in the same place.  This really does tend to bring out detail.

With the paint dry, I moved on to powders.

I started with rust, coating the metal parts, W irons, springs, iron fittings on solebar, buffers, strapping and rubbing it down with an old brush (don't use a good one, this really wrecks brushes).  Next I applied burnt umber powder (dirt) to tone down the rust.  Finally I used black powder to bring everything together.

I used a fiber pen to bring out bare metal on the buffer heads.  I used a silver pencil to highlight the door banger end which would have been bare metal.

I didn't neglect the interior.  I started by using my airbrush to spray aged concrete on the bottom and sides.  I then used pretty much the same procedure as described above to try to represent a natural wood but abused interior.

John


Last edited on Sat Jan 14th, 2017 11:02 pm by Brossard

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Superb John,
Whose make is the aged concrete paint colour? It sounds like a useful colour to have on hand.

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Thanks Rob, I still have quite a few bottles of Poly S acrylic (excellent paint)  but the range was discontinued by Testors.  It's sort of a light yellow/cream which I think is a good starting point for natural wood.  Certainly not wood coloured paint :roll:.

John

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Cheers John,
I like the idea of it being acrylic, a shame it's discontinued.

I use mostly Vallejo these days - not only because it's good paint, but more because I can buy it local to me.


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I mostly use acrylic.  Vallejo is superb paint with a wide range of colours.  I saw a video of theirs on weathering a Panzer II - it fair took my breath away.  I did a quick search and there are lots.

John


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Well, yesterday I girded up my loins (horrific mental image I know) and applied the transfers to my 3 vans:



Ex LNER Cattle wagon from Parkside.  I repainted this with Lifecolour BR Bauxite.  Transfers are included in Parkside kits, from Model Master.



BR Std van from Slaters.  Transfers are NOT included in every kit.  These are from Fox.



Ex LNER goods van from Parkside.

I am VERY happy with these.  They are ready for weathering. 

John

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Nice work, John.  :thumbs

Did you get your loin girder from MicroMark?  :lol:

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Looking good John, 
Adding transfers to Parkside wagons is one of this weekends dubious pleasures in the Pulham household. 

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You'd better get yourself over to Micromark then to get some loin girders.

John

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Much excitement chez John today as a package from Hattons arrived:



Dapol BR standard van.  Compare to the BR van above.  As someone said, the only standard thing about these is that are not standard.  This example has plywood sides and 4 shoe vacuum brakes.  It is VERY good.  My only niggle is that there should be an instanter link on the couplings.  I'll add these to my Slaters shopping list.

Someone mentioned that these fitted vehicles should have a lamp bracket - I think have some of these spare so I'll be fitting these.



BR Hybar open wagon.  Again fitted with 4 shoe AVB.  I managed to scrounge a pair of instanter links from another kit and you can see these.  The niggle (there always is isn't there?) is that the sides are slightly bowed.  This seems to be a chronic condition with RTR open wagons.  I'm very pleased all the same.



Unfitted BR open wagon.  As most people will know, BR painted unfitted stock grey and fitted stock bauxite.  Slightly bowed in sides alas.  3 link couplings are correct for this vehicle.

The white patch on the solebar will be a waybill card inserted into a spring clip.

Happy days.  :chicken

John

Last edited on Fri Jan 20th, 2017 09:55 pm by Brossard

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For quite some time I've been working on a Dia 61 LNER brake van.  This is a Slaters kit.  I've been trying to work out whether or not it should have vacuum brakes and my research has made me conclude it should.  A very helpful soul on another forum provided me some information to help me to configure the underframe:





The upper arms that connect to the outer end are very fragile - they are safe in the box.

As is my wont, the axleboxes are sprung.

The doors are supplied as 4 panes but indications are that most of these had solid planked doors - you can just see my replacement in 0.020" plastic card.  This was scribed to represent planks.

I started by removing the moulded trusses under the solebars, fitted vans don't appear to have had these. 

I then made some vee hangers from brass strip and washers.  I also made the the actuator arms from strip brass and a bit of wire.

The vacuum cylinder is a Parkside spare.  The tee lifter is brass wire soldered together.  I soldered/glued a piece of wire for the vac. pipe connection.

I added a vacuum pipe which is the angled wire.

The cross rod is 2mm plastic.

The kit includes some very nice brass etches for the brake hangers above the axles.  There is also an etch representing the brake actuation mechanism, the end of which aligns with a hole in the floor where the manual brake screw comes out.  (I have an interior brake standard).  I added a lever adjacent to the manual lever that I connected to the vac. brake lever.  This is bit terra incognita but I reckon that there was likely to be a clutch arrangement to permit automatic and manual braking.  I added some plastic vee brackets to support the brake lever fulcrum.

Finally I added the connections to the brake hangers under the axles.

John

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Superb John,
I may plagiarise these shots when I get to mine (its a Connoisseur rather than Slaters) mines a BR van that I plan to backdate to an LNER version. I just need to confirm that mines would have been fitted too at the time. 

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Plagiarise away Rob, it's what I did.  I'll PM you with something you might find useful.

John

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I've never built a wagon in my life but Rob and John's work is so inspiring  that I might just have a go myself. Any tips gentlemen !


Superb workmanship you guys. Master craftsmen both.


Allan

Last edited on Fri Jan 20th, 2017 11:35 pm by allan downes

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Go on Allan, 'ave a bash.  Parkside are maybe a bit simpler than Slaters.  They are all plastic, although some parts are ABS (as opposed to styrene) for strength.  Perhaps a good start point would be a PO wagon.  No transfers :roll:.

John

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Thanks John. Parkside you say. Will look into it. Anything Southern ?

Allan

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Oh yes from what I recall:

http://www.parksidedundas.co.uk/acatalog/PARKSIDE_DUNDAS_ROLLING_STOCK_KITS.html

Lets hope 0 gauge becomes a pandemic.

John

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Thanks John

 Went to your link and reckon I'm gonna have a go then blame you when it goes all pear shaped !

Allan.

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I can't imagine anything you do, going pear shaped, Allan.  :cool:

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Nor can I, but just remember I did recommend you start with something simple.  Rigging clasp brakes can make you crazy.

John

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Over the last while I've been working on a Slaters kit of the BR Insulated van, Dia 1/251.   250 were built starting in 1952.  These were initially white but changed to pale blue in the early 60s.  Their final livery was bauxite in the 1970s.

Since my era is ~1962, I left the model white.



Things to note are the 4 shoe Morton brake gear and instanter couplings.  Note also the reinforcing bar between the axle boxes.  White is an annoying colour and there are mucky fingermarks from handling.  The van will be weathered so I'm not too bothered.

Even though the plastic was white, once the body was built and on the underframe it was sprayed with light grey primer.  This was followed by Testors flat white.

Next I sprayed it with gloss varnish to form a base for the transfers.  Transfers are from Fox and went on without drama.  Once the transfers had dried (overnight), I finished with Testors matte varnish.

John

Last edited on Fri Feb 3rd, 2017 01:16 am by Brossard

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Very nice John, at least (unlike me) you didn't paint it blue to find that it should have been white. Since spending a bit of time mixing the 'right' colour blue for my A type container I have found that in 1928 (when the photo that I am working from is dated) that it should have been bauxite.
All is not lost because I have few engineers wagons in the stash which will need my Oxford Blue paint but I will need to repaint the container to suit my plan for it.

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I did have a bit of a debate with myself about the colour, perhaps someone will come along to tell me its all wrong.

I'm working on a Slaters Conflat A at the moment along with two containers.  I painted one maroon and the other bauxite.  My reasoning is that 1962 seems to be something of a transition point for liveries.

John

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Brossard wrote:   My reasoning is that 1962 seems to be something of a transition point for liveries.


1937 seems to have been a similar point in time for the grouping liveries. 

Sadly I don't even have that excuse. I have only ever seen LNER containers in blue so hadn't realised that they had been bauxite originally and hadn't researched them at all. 

At least it has been pointed out before I got to the point of fastening onto the OCT which I suspect would have been a pain to undo. - You live and learn as they say.

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A problem I keep running into Rob, is that the vast majority of photos, whether it be the 1930s or 1960s are black and white.  Even those few that are in colour cannot be trusted.  Everyone says you should use photos for weathering, but B&W isn't very helpful.

Anyway, every day should teach us something.

John

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I think I've finished the Toad D.  The only thing left is weathering.

First, the interior:



Brake standard and you can make out the stovepipe.



From the other side.  None of this can be seen easily with the roof on.  It may help others who are building this in other scales.

A view underneath:



Note the safety loops around the brake yokes.  I've mentioned this before, not only don't kit makers include the parts but they completely ignore them and don't even mention them in the instructions...strange.

Finally, the van itself:



Looking pretty smart I think in ex works condition.  Handrails are 0.45mm NS wire.  I carefully fitted these to their location.  The tee rail is made by but soldering wire.  I used a plastic spacer which didn't show any melting at all.  The result of obeying a cardinal rule of soldering: get in and get out quick sharp.

The shaped wire was then chemically blackened and fitted.  The rails were secured with CA.  After that I brush painted them white.

I used the same process for the corner lamp brackets.

As usual, the coupling is screw link from Dapol.

The model is based on a picture of E19244.

To finish, I sprayed the van all over with gloss varnish.  The helps to seat the transfers.  Transfers were applied using microset.  When hard another coat of varnish  to seal.  I won't you with the booboos and other slipups. :oops:

Yes, I know, the bottom step is crooked - didn't notice that until I saw the photo - :roll:

John

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The last wagon kit I have to build is a Slaters Conflat A.  Here's the state of play:



A lot of busy looking gubbins under the wagon.  The wagon itself is simple enough.  There's an etched brass template provided to drill those holes which will take the hold down loops.  The toolbox is an etched plate, bent to suit.  Rivets were pushed out with a scriber.



Brake gear was pretty complicated and this took the bulk of build effort.  Most of it is etched brass.  Again my homemade safety loops can be seen.

To complement this wagon I have two containers:



The one on the left is in 1950s maroon livery.  On the right is the later, 1960s, bauxite livery.



The corner brackets and roof brackets are brass castings.  There's a fiddly link that is inserted into the bracket.



Transfers are from Fox.  The corner data doesn't have a border in the pictures I've found.  I toyed with the idea of trimming but in the end left it.  I did scrap a couple of transfers, they are very fragile.

John

Last edited on Sat Feb 4th, 2017 06:22 am by Brossard

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Excellent work, John.  :thumbs

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MaxSouthOz wrote: Excellent work, John.  :thumbs
I can only agree with Max, Superb stuff both of them.

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I've said it before and I'll say it again. Absolutely top class kit building.


Magnificent.


Allan.

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Thanks guys.

Did you ever get a wagon kit Allan?

John

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Not yet John, still seeking the essential therapy.

BTW John. What are 'safety loops' and what do they do ?

Allan

Last edited on Sun Feb 5th, 2017 03:51 pm by allan downes

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Well keep up the therapy and make sure you take your tablets.

Safety loops are pieces of bent iron positioned so that if part of the brake gear becomes undone or breaks they will catch the parts before they hit the track.  Without these, the train could well derail if broken parts get tangled up.

Four shoe brakes also had them in the form of (usually) vertical strapping around the pull rods.

John

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The LNER brake has been weathered:



Usual methods.  Note the red standpipe to denote vacuum fitted (white for through piped).

John

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Here's the weathered Toad E:



Pictures show the van to be grimy but not utterly filthy so I hope I've captured that.

John

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Two more nice ones.  :thumbs :thumbs

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Interesting to note that BR painted some Grey and some Bauxite (presumably unfitted and fitted?) but the LNER painted them all bauxite irrespective of whether they were fitted or not.

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Cheers Max.

You are right Rob, BR had a system as you say.  I think it might be more correct to say that brake vans that could work fitted trains were painted bauxite.  This would include through piped vans.

I know LMS didn't distinguish, they simply changed their goods livery to bauxite in 1936.  Starting about 1940, NPCS vehicles also started to be painted bauxite (they called it "lake" which was the undercoat) instead of maroon - a wartime austerity measure.

John

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More weathering today, this time the BR open wagons:





Couplings can be a bit of a trial, the links keep getting tangled.  I actually installed a Slaters set on this.



Trying to replicate the look of well used bare wood.  The wagon started with a cream floor and sides.  I airbrushed a light coat of concrete (kind of a dark cream) first.  I then airbrushed some dirt and then some black.  Not too much.

I then brushed on and rubbed in dirt and black on individual planks to try to show the different shades.

John

Last edited on Sat Feb 11th, 2017 12:35 am by Brossard

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Oh, yes!  :thumbs

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The weathering on them is sublime John. A standard to aim for.

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I'm happy to hear that Rob, as ever I worry about overdoing.

John

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I completed the build of the Conflat A wagon some while ago but never got around to posting pictures, so here it is:





I wanted to show both sides because, if you are sharpo eyed, you will see that the brake lever arrangement is different.  This is so that the brake pull rods work from either side.  I obviously still have to do the transfers.

John

Last edited on Tue Mar 7th, 2017 09:24 pm by Brossard

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A bit more weathering, this time the Berry Wiggins oil tank:



Looking at photos, it is evident that some effort was made to make the wagon data legible so I cleaned off the solebar.

John

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Yeah, that's one place where cleanliness is much function as it is form.

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Hi John,
I am not sure how I missed these. Are they the Slaters kit? Do you have any idea of the origins of this particular type of conflat? By that I mean was it a BR design or did it originate with one of the big four? I would like some LNER examples but in the absence of a finding a kit that I could perhaps modify I might have to scratch build some. I have some basic drawings for the larger type LNER containers and would like to have a go as some.

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The model is Slaters and a very good one.  I daresay the Conflat A can trace its' origins to one of the big 4 but I haven't sufficient familiarity with them to say which.  Perhaps someone can enlighten us.  The brake gear is pure BR though, it is quite convoluted but Slater's supply a brass etch which makes things easier. 

The kit comes with a very good screw link coupling kit which actually works, in that the links can be tightened - not that I'll ever bother with that.

John

Last edited on Wed Mar 8th, 2017 01:57 am by Brossard

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Thanks John, hopefully someone more knowledgable than use can give a bit more background. 
I agree, while a bit fiddly to put together, the Slaters screw link couplings are amongst the best there is for fidelity in my opinion.

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Brossard wrote: The model is Slaters and a very good one.  I daresay the Conflat A can trace its' origins to one of the big 4 but I haven't sufficient familiarity with them to say which.  Perhaps someone can enlighten us.  The brake gear is pure BR though, it is quite convoluted but Slater's supply a brass etch which makes things easier. 



The kit comes with a very good screw link coupling kit which actually works, in that the links can be tightened - not that I'll ever bother with that.



John


Parkside Dundas also do a kit, I've nearly finished my second.
I'm doing one in early BR livery and the other in GWR (it was originally  
a GWR design, H7) as I have a couple of containers, 1 BR and 1 GWR!
BTW, the transfers (decals) are a PITA, there is not a lot of
room on the sides.

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Hi Jeff, I did notice that Parkside do a GWR Conflat.  Transfers are always a PITA and yes for this wagon there will be scrunching.  I have some Fox transfers for the wagon and containers (described above).  Such a lot of wagon types and so little time.

John

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While I wait for wood to be cut for the layout, I have turned my attention back to kits.  I was given a Parkside SR Pillbox brake.  These were built without AVB so that's how I'll do it even though BR did fit a few with the system.  Being unfitted meant their usefulness waned as BR shifted more and more vehicles to AVB.

Here's where I am:



I have the wheels installed.  Note that I blackened and painted them prior to this.  Up to now I have done spring suspension in my kit wagons.  This time I built the underframe as intended.  The axleboxes are free to move in the axleguards providing a modicum of compensation.

I built up the duckets and installed these in the sides.

The inner ends have had windows added.  Most of the pictures I've seen show the added windows in BR days.

My reference material is very thin for SR stock (basically limited to quite good pictures in Geoff Kents' The 4mm Wagon), if anyone has info on the interiors I'd be obliged.

I'll have to hit pause on the upper works for a while until I can do the interior.

John



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I installed the brake gear to day:





Being unfitted, the gear is relatively simple.  Getting the yokes done was a fiddle.  Patience is the key.

John

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Brossard wrote:  Patience is the key

It sure is, making sure that the glue is dry before you try to push the yokes through the holes in the mounting/operating mechanism being the key to success I think. But at least you do get it with the Parkside kits, you don't with many of what are otherwise excellent brass kit's. In fact I would say that brake gear in general is a weak point of many brass kits. Sadly many think that a single layer of etch is sufficient to portray brake blocks which are pretty chunky things even on the smallest of wagon or loco.

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Well, yes and using a broach to open the holes ahead of final fitting.  In my experience moulded holes are NEVER big enough.  Not really a bad thing, better than being too large.

I've had 4mm brake frets (Mainly Trains I think) that are three layers thick.  Of course 4 shoe brake gear pull rods should be two layers of plate not solid as so often portrayed in kits.

I'll put this away for now until I get some sort of inspiration about the interior.  No shortage of jobs.

John

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Hi John, I've just been catching up on your wagon builds and while I do know a brake block from a stand pipe l have no idea how to connect the two together :roll: (yes, joking).
I do however treat a lot of the modelling I see with the "reality stare" in that if I can look at a model for a short time and nothing jumps out at me and says 'Model!' I'm impressed with the workmanship of the creator.

I'm impressed.

Marty

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Thanks Marty, hope I'm keeping you entertained.

John

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Always! If not a little jealous of such beautiful stock, but tackling N scale underframes I am not!
Marty

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Ah well, N is something I never got into, seems a tad on the small side, especially as I get older.

John

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Today I decided to equip the van with 3 point compensation instead of letting things flop about:



Not easy to see but I soldered a piece of 0.032" wire to some copper clad, just visible under the far axle.  The trick was to get the top of the wire so the axle rested on it and pivoted.

I also inserted some 0.5mm thick plastic strip between the top of the near axle boxes and springs to make them rigid.

Additionally, I've added safety loops to the pull rods.



I did the roof too.  Mostly a doddle but the rainstrips needed care.  These ore 0.020" plastic rod.

John

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Still watching.  :cool:

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Mostly finished the SR brake now.  Here's a shot of the interior:



I received a drawing from a kind member of RMWeb that enabled me to complete this.

Transfers next.

John

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Nice,  the planked floor is very realistic. Is it done with coffee stirrers (or other wood equivalent)?

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Ha ha, I was pleasantly surprised at how the planks came out.  They are the original plastic.  I scribed and sanded the cab planks to simulate grain.  The floor was painted "concrete" which is a sort of cream to begin with.  I bought some Tamiya panel lining paint which is very much like a wash and used that to give me the grain highlights.  Finished off with umber (earth) and black powders to make the planks look different.

John

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Brossard wrote: to make the planks look different.


Well John,  you certainly achieved what you set out to then. I would certainly be both pleased and proud of a result like that.

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:oops:

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I had several vehicles to apply transfers to so I got it yesterday.

Here's the Conflat A (finally!):



Fox transfers.

I've done the SR brake.  Had to redo the tare marking today because I noticed that the original had gone ahoo.  I also did the BR insulated van again.  I didn't like my weathering and when I cleaned that up I took the transfers with it :roll:.

John

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Here's the insulated van:



My previous attempt to weather this van produced something execrably filthy despite trying to keep the powder use to a minimum. I scrutinized pictures of vans and in no case were they all that filthy above the solbars. I used IPA to wash the old powder but in so doing wrecked the transfers.  I redid these yesterday.

Today I tried something new, Tamiya Panel Line paint.  It's a thin wash, brown in this case.  I think the result is quite pleasing.

I need to give the tyres a polish.

John

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Got the SR brake van completed today:



The corner post lamp brackets are bent NS scrap.  I gave up on the plastic ones after breaking two.  Center lamp brackets are Slaters cast brass, again plastic are supplied but I think they won't stand up in use.

Step hangers supplied were...you guessed it, plastic.  Again I replaced these with brass wire assemblies that feel much stronger.  If they do get knocked they'll bend rather than break.

John

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Getting up to all sorts this past few days.

Decided to sort out my Lionheart BR van.  These are very good models but can do with some titivating.  I detailed the buffer beams:



From left to right:

- cast brass lamp bracket
- cast brass QR connector receptacle
- vacuum pipe
- coupling with instanter link

All these were sourced from Slaters.

Underneath I ran a pipe and connected the vac cylinder to the pipe.

I broke a tiebar and repaired it by gluing a strip of plastic to the back.  I did the same with the other one.

I also rolled out a completed Slaters BR standard van:



Nothing in particular to note.  As the kit notes point out, the only thing standard about these is how non standard they were.

John

Last edited on Mon May 8th, 2017 11:05 pm by Brossard

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Hi John,
I like the finish on the insulated van,  it's very realistic. 

I did a search on the [highlight= rgb(254, 252, 246); font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;]Tamiya Panel Line paint and unless I can find some either post free or locally it works out at about £10 a bottle - Ouch! I have a brass kit for an Insix Fish van to build soon for sale, and I reckon that if I can get a finish similar to yours it will fly out of the door.

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Many thanks for that Rob.  The panel lining isn't cheap, I think mine was $7.50.  I found this:

https://www.emodels.co.uk/tamiya-panel-line-accent-color-black-87131.html

Funny how some products are priced at the same number in different currencies.

John

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Been following this thread with great interest and  awe at your talent John

Keep it coming.


Allan..


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...and I've been following yours with equal awe Allan.  Mutual admiration society.  :chicken

John

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Decided to weather a couple of wagons today:

Slaters BR Std van, planked sides:



Usual methods for beneath the solebars - airbrush earth/black then rust powder followed by brown/black powder.

The body was also airbrushed lightly.  I then highlighted the ribs and door details with brown/black powder.  Following this I used my panel lining colour give an overall subtle weathered look (well I think so).  Most of the powder got washed off but some seeped into crevices.

Dapol BR std van, plywood sides:



Same methods as above.

John

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Here's the Conflat weathered and loaded up:



John

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Stunning.

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Just want to show the SR brake weathered:



John

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Some news on the wagon front.

First I received my Class B tank wagon from Dapol:



Excellent.  The icing in the box is a second hand Corgi Morris Minor.  Prices for new Corgi are pretty steep so I was glad to see this in Hattons' pre owned section for a reasonable amount.  Everyday cars seem rare as Oxford tend to produce a lot of limousines and upmarket vehicles.

Next, I decided to have a go at an etched brass kit.

This is from David Parkins' Modern Motive Power (MMP) range.  It's a LMS Dia 2134 steel mineral wagon.  BR based their design (of which I have two MMP kits; Dia 108/1 and 109/1) on this I believe.  All were unfitted so will make an interesting train along with the 3 PO wagons.



The sheet on the left is the chassis and on the right is the sheet for the body.



Additional detail sheets which I haven't fully sussed out.  Lots of etched builders plates.

I particularly like the phosphor bronze strips, these will make up working leaf springs.

There are a number of bends to make and I decided top use bending bars to accomplish these.  My setup is simple and I've described it before.



The idea is to clamp the piece to be bent between the edge of the workmate and a steel file.  The half etched bend line is lined up with the edge of the bench and everything tightened.  Use a tool (in this case the medium file) to push the material up against the edge of the file (mine happens to have a dead edge) and make sure the bend is 90 degrees.  I use the small hammer to get the bend crisp against the file edge.

Here's where I am right now:



Lots of bends as you can see.  The two brackets on the central beam were the very devil to do.  There are etched slots for them but, of course these are undersized.  Fettling was the order of the day but I still managed to lose one of these tiny brackets.  I made a new one from strip.  In the end I had a stroke .... of genius and soldered the bracket to some wire.  I could then wield the thing without fear of dropping or losing and get the bracket seated through the beam.  Phew!  :pathead

John

Last edited on Tue Jun 6th, 2017 10:16 pm by Brossard

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I like the idea of soldering the small part to wire John. One I will shamelessly plagiarise.
I found that there is a certain mindset with MMP kit's and once you are in it they go together superbly. I also David (Parkins) idea of using thin laminates to build strength in rather than using thick etch which is sometimes difficult to fettle and bend.

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Amazing what you come up with when sleeping on a problem.  I got confused with the arrangement of corner brackets on the central beam and put some on in the wrong place.  Lesson learned (I hope).  They're not in a visible place so I'm not going to get too fussed.

John

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I didn't get to the kit today, pottering about doing this and that.

Here's where I left off last night.  Solebars on along with overlays.  Angled beams also added.



There will be a number of corner and angle brackets to put on.

John

Last edited on Thu Jun 8th, 2017 05:41 am by Brossard

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So, my friend who has been helping with boards, asked me to make his two 0 gauge wagon kits.  Seems a good deal since I like making kits.  The first kit, which I've nearly finished is a Parkside GWR Hybar open wagon.  This doesn't present much drama.

The other kit is of a GWR Drinking Water Tank Wagon, something I hadn't even heard of before now.  It is etched brass from Dragon models:

http://www.taffvale.wales/index.php



The kit requires wheels and couplings and these are on order from Slaters.

There's a bag of decent looking whitemetal castings and turned buffers.

I had a debate on RMWeb about the colour of the wagon.  The notes say dark green with yellow lettering, but WR BR Departmental stock in the late 50s was typically black with white lettering.  There are no commercial transfers that I know of so I will have a go at making them myself.

I thought I'd make a start this evening by doing the tedious job of punching out rivets:



You can see all the rivets.  Not too difficult really.  I rest the brass on a piece of good quality plywood (you can use a cutting mat too) and use the scriber and hammer to knock them out.  Three moderately firm taps with the hammer brings the rivets out.

John

Last edited on Wed Jun 21st, 2017 03:50 am by Brossard

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This morning I assembled the tank.  The sides require a curve to be formed which was something of a challenge.  I used a drill bit and clamps mostly.  I then used a slightly larger bit as an anvil to smooth the curve.  It all came out reasonably well. 

The sides are slightly long I think.  There's a half etched rebate at each end of the side where the ends are supposed to sit.  I had to file the end curve to blend with the half etch to get a decent fit.





I'm using my Weller variable temperature soldering station for this, 50W rating.  There is a lot of metal mass and I set the tip temp. to nearly 400C (I normally use 345C) to get the solder going.  The solder is DCC concepts 145C (I suspect it is lead free, something I usually don't like, but this seems to work OK).  My flux is Tix which I can get at my local hobby shop.

An interesting thing to note is that I could see the tip temp take a dive from the nearly 400C set point to around 360C whenever I applied solder.  The flux, solder and workpiece will all absorb heat and the iron must have the cajones to recover quickly.

Solder was applied in a series of tacks working at one end of the piece, then the other.  The tacks were eventually joined together in a seam.  It's always a good idea to start with a couple or three tacks.  You can then inspect alignment and squareness.  It is easy to undo a tack to make a correction.  Trying to undo a seam is very difficult.

John 

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Hi John,
How do you plan to tackle the over long ends? iI might have been tempted to shorten the ends before fitting them.

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I left the ends alone Rob.  If I filed them, the rivet line would be off.  These end plates do overhang according to the instructions so I think it's OK.

John

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I've been blasting away at my water tank:



Looking more like a wagon now.



The rocking W iron unit provides compensation.

I am stuck now waiting for wheels which were ordered getting on for 2 weeks ago.

I spent a lot of time scraping off excess solder and generally cleaning up.

John

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I decided to use some slave wheels from another project in order to make progress on this wagon.  The next step was brake gear and, TBH, this is a disappointment.   I meant to take a picture but forgot.  You can see the brake etch in the picture from my 20 June post.  It is merely a flat representation of the brake shoes and push rods.  This won't do sez I, I have a rep as a brake gear geek to uphold.

So, out came the Dremel and I set out to basically scratch build the brakes using the kit etch as a basis.  I carved shoes from some scrap strip, 8 in all because they needed to be double thickness.

It took a while but here is the result:





Plastic kit and RTR manufacturers would have us believe that the brake push rods are solid.  They're not and comprise two parallel bars linked to the brakes.  I did need to fettle the clearance between brake and wheel and the wagon is running freely.  The wheels weren't fixed and quite sloppy so I expect I'll have to do a bit more when the proper wheels arrive.

John

Last edited on Sun Jun 25th, 2017 03:49 am by Brossard

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IHi John,I have had to do a similar exercise on a few kit's, thanks goodness for scrap etch.

Just wait until you get to the brakes on the MMP Kit John, all your brake gear fantasies will come true.

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It's part of the challenge of making a model of the subject rather than simply building the kit.

Annoyingly, I found whitemetal brake shoes in the castings bag so I've reshaped my shoes to suit.

Must get back to the MMP soon.

John


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I made some cracking progress on the tank:



Rivet strips on the tops of the ends and sides.  Roof on (what a PITA!) and more rivet strips.  Almost there really.

The rod between the V hangers is temporary and will be cut off.  Brakes were independent, ie you could only apply brakes on one side at a time.

John

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Right so all't brass is on:



Spigot brackets, brake lever ratchet and lever as well as safety loops.

It is currently taking a bath in white vinegar.

John

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Brossard wrote:

It is currently taking a bath in white vinegar.

John

Presumably the white vinegar cleans away the crud that accumulates during the build? - A new one on me.

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Well in the absence of an ultrasonic cleaner which I must look into, it does a fair job of cleaning and pickling.

Working on the W/M bits now, although I haven't got wheels yet so can't fit springs, axleboxes and brake shoes.
 
Probably prime later today.

John

Last edited on Mon Jun 26th, 2017 11:53 pm by Brossard

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The wagon looks a lot better in primer grey:



I masked the bearing holes since I need to solder those in when the wheels finally get here.  I'll paint the black tomorrow after the primer has had a chance to cure.

John

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I mentioned above that I had a commission to build two kits.  Besides the water tank, the other is a GWR Dia 033 from Parkside:



I used Slaters instanter couplings and vacuum pipe.



I tried to make the interior look like natural wood that has seen service.

John

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Very nice, I do like the weathered wood effect John.

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Thanks, these Parkside kits do make up nice.

John

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Brossard wrote: I mentioned above that I had a commission to build two kits.  Besides the water tank, the other is a GWR Dia 033 from Parkside:





I used Slaters instanter couplings and vacuum pipe.



I tried to make the interior look like natural wood that has seen service.

John

Hi John.

Those Slaters instant couplings. How do they work and can they be fitted to an O Gauge Dapol Terrier and there wagons ?


Thanks.


Allan

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OK back to the water tank.  It is now painted black but annoyingly I still don't have wheels :brickwall

I think I've gone as far as I can:



I'm very pleased with how this turned out.  I used Testors rattle can flat black.  I gives a nice finish but already, because of handling I can see scuff marks.

Couplings:  These are Parkside, robbed from the GWR kit.  I finally twigged that the top link needs to be soldered closed so it doesn't fall out of the gap in the coupler.

Buffers:  The kit contains 6 castings which are essentially whitmetal tubes.  These require careful drilling to ensure that there are two different internal diameters for proper buffer springing.  I did scrap one of them when my drill went to far.  I also noticed that the springs provided were not all the same and quite large too.  I replaced them with finer springs (Slaters I think).  I was also annoyed that the holes in the buffer beam are smaller than the nut so I had to do the nuts after installing the housings in the buffer beam.  Fiddly but doable.  I finished off by securing the nuts with thread locker LocTite.  I don't recommend using CA because you can break the threaded part off if you ever want to remove the buffer.

I painted the spigots brass and touched up the brake handle with white.

I also worked on the transfers.  A dreadful disappointment but I got some usable decals.



I used Microscale white backed sheets and the instructions do say that these are really for laser printers (although my old Samsung laser made a mess too).  I sprayed some dullcote on the sheet before printing.  The good news is that my all singing and all dancing printer does feed the sheet.  I finished with some Testors decal coat.

You will see that I can get one set of the lettering, but most of the Tare numbers are rubbish.  I can use numbers from my (now) extensive collection of transfers.

John

Last edited on Tue Jun 27th, 2017 10:21 pm by Brossard

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ITMA  :mutley

Allan, instanter couplings were only used on vacuum brake fitted wagons as far as I know.  They were an alternative to the screw link type which your Terrier should have.  Instanters could be used as regular three link for loose coupled trains or by putting the instanter link vertical reducing the coupling gap for fitted trains.  They were cheaper and lighter than screw link but would not be used (I don't think) on passenger trains.

Unfitted wagons could have them I suppose but more commonly they would have 3 link.  I never like to be too definitive because Sods Law says that as soon as you are, some smart aleck will find evidence to contradict you.

A bit more:  http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/gansg/4-rstock/04arstock2b.htm

HTH

John

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I have my wheels for the water tank now so I'm slowly bringing that to completion.  Brake shoes have to be fitted and that's slow because I have to wait for CA to cure properly.

While that's happening I thought I'd return to my LMS steel mineral:



I've made pretty good progress over the last day.  Everything's hard work with multiple laminations.  I spent probably 2 hours yesterday making the drawbars from 6 laminations :roll:.

These MMP kits are ideal for the OCD modeller.

Happily, there's a section on these in Essery's "Official Drawings of LMS Wagons" Vol 1.

John

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The last day has been spent detailing the solebar:



Grab handle, waybill clip, owners plate, vee hangers, door banger bracket and body support brackets.

Doesn't seem a lot but we plod along one bit at a time.  There are a lot of parts, many of them quite tiny, however I console myself with the assurance that there are a finite number.

John

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Hi John,
But just think how many hour's of enjoyment in the hobby you are getting for the money.

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I'm just glad kit makers don't charge on that basis.

I just hope I don't make a fundamental mistake.  All this is terra incognita.  Once I've done this the others will be a little easier because I'll know what to expect.

John

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I came to a reluctant decision yesterday and stopped work on the underframe.  I was becoming increasingly unhappy about the state of things.  It came to a head when I tried to assemble the leaf springs.  These are supposed to work but as I proceeded, it was evident that this is not the case.  A trial with wheels showed the chassis to be shocking out of whack and I had some ideas as to how to deal with that.

In cases like this, there is a risk that you will become exceedingly discouraged and go sulk for 6 months.

I took a step back and refocused on the priority to have reasonable models of steel mineral wagons.

Plan B this morning therefore was to buy Peco underframe kits.  I can use details from the MMP kits to improve their fidelity.  These will look good, even if they don't include the ridiculous level of detail that MMP provides.  The main thing is that I'm confident I can assemble the underframes to work properly.

As for the bodies, I will have a go at the MMP kit.  At least there aren't any things critical to running.

John

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Brossard wrote In cases like this, there is a risk that you will become exceedingly discouraged and go sulk for 6 months.

John

No wonder it takes so long to build a layout, John and, as for me, I'm in a permanent  sulk !


Allan

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We can't let these things get us down Allan, there's almost always a solution.

A cup of tea and a plate of biscuits and all is right with the world.

John

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Brossard wrote:
In cases like this, there is a risk that you will become exceedingly discouraged and go sulk for 6 months.

Hi John,

When I built my first MMP kit I ended up doing just that and for a lot longer than 6 months but eventually I returned to it and this is the result





I have since lettered it but alas it still needs the black bit's painting and some weathering. I have subsequently done some other MMP stuff without a hitch.


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Encouraging to know Rob.  Do your springs work?  Perhaps if I were to do another underframe (I had bought three kits) I would do much better knowing what to expect.  This doesn't change the fact that there are still fragile bits that get bent and twisted as the model is handled.  These parts will take only so much correction before they break.

As it is, my plan is to use the Peco underframes and the MMP bodies (I can imagine you rolling your eyes) because the goal is to produce credible mineral wagons and not to spend half my life soldering bits and pieces to the underframe.

I also bought a Parkside Dia 1/100 Mineral wagon kit.

John

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Brossard wrote: We can't let these things get us down Allan, there's almost always a solution.

A cup of tea and a plate of biscuits and the current issue of Playboy and all is right with the world.

John


John's post edited to come in line with modern trends ( well here in Immingham anyway...)


Allan

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Is Playboy even a thing anymore....?  :hmm

John

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Not those under my bed, John !

Allan.

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OK, now you're giving too much information.

I had a vision of dust bunnies cavorting with the Playboy bunnies.

John

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Brossard wrote: Encouraging to know Rob.  Do your springs work?  
Hi John,
They do, although I couldn't seem to get all the leaves in - I recall that I left one layer of them out on my first go. I subsequently built some MMP sprung W Irons for a scratch built tank and I managed to get them all in on that - the first go is definitely a learning curve.

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Hah!  I discovered that the one spring pocket I had left from the kit was too small to get all the leafs in.  I had built up the hornblocks with the spring pockets back to front (I know, I know :roll:) so repaired by bending up brass strip and soldering that on.  My scratch pocket allowed all the leaves in, so I think you and I are on the same page.

Anyway, my point was that if the springs don't work, there isn't much point in going to the trouble of all this detail.  To me a moulded spring would be fine.

John

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I finally got the water tank to a point where I can call it finished.  The brake shoe fixing took a longtime and the lettering was a sorry tale of equipment not up to the job, errors and experiments gone horribly wrong.



This is why weathering was invented.

John

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Looks good from here, John.  :cool:

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From here too,  I am looking forward to your take on the weathering.

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These last two wagons (the Hybar and Water Tank) are a commission from a buddy of mine who hasn't the time to make kits (he emailed me a few days ago from UK to say he's bought two more kits, thankfully routine prototypes).  I need to discuss with him about weathering, it's not for everyone.

John

 

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I bought a third hand Coopercraft GWR 3 plank wagon from a fellow O gauge modeller in Ontario.  The price was right and I wanted to see what these kits are like.

As delivered the model has parts for Dean Churchward (DC) brake levers but brakes for the standard lever system.  I know this now because of a discussion on RMWeb: 

http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/49132-dc01-brakes-after-1948/

Only after I reworked the brakes for DC did I learn that these 3 planks had lever brakes :roll:

So, I spent a fair bit of time making new brakes from parts in my spares box.

The result:



The kit comes with horrid solid buffers but I put on my hair shirt and modified them for springing - quite a learning experience.  I had a set of Slaters buffers.

The couplings supplied are also quite dreadful so I used Parkside 3 links.

Safety loops are from 1mm phosphor broaze strip as are the brake handle guides.  Levers are from my spares box.



The prototype wagon was probably built at the turn of the last century and when built was fitted with brakes on one side.

In 1912 (I think) the Board of Trade mandated that wagons have brakes on both sides and I've built this to reflect compliance with that order.  There's only one brake on this side and each side is independent.

Some good info here:

http://www.gwr.org.uk/nowagonbrakes.html



A shot to illustrate the interior weathering.  The mouldings don't have bolt detail so I took an idea from Barry Norman and made them from blobs of PVA.

John


Last edited on Mon Jul 31st, 2017 12:48 am by Brossard

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I've been working on another GWR wagon, this time a covered goods for my friend.

It's a Parkside kit of a Dia. V33 - 9' WB, unfitted.  However, I felt that to be plausible for BR service in 1962 it had to be fitted.  This meant conversion to V21.  Even so we are in Rule 1 territory because 9' WB stock was ruthlessly culled in the early 60s.

Further discussion here:

http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/124590-parkside-ps24-gwr-goods-wagon-dia-v33/



I used Slaters instanter couplings and GWR coach vacuum pipe.

Tie bar is 1mm phosphor bronze strip.



Lamp brackets, which would not be fitted to an unfitted vehicle, are Slaters.

John

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I put the lettering on the above two wagons yesterday:



This is a shot from the cylinder side.

I had to make a composite number from individual numerals which was a PITA.

Vacuum braked stock was supposed to have red pipes and all the pictures I've seen had this.  Through piped vehicles were supposed to have white pipes.



At least the Coopercraft instructions had some info on numbers and Tare.  I used Fox transfers.

John

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Five star workmanship as usual, John. And, as I've noticed, not very many arggggs lately !

A masterclass on how it should be done if ever there was and completely wasted on me !


Allan

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Thanks Allan.  Actually the 3 plank was nothing but "aaarghh" as I struggled to understand how the brakes were arranged.  The kit was useless in that respect having parts for DC and lever brakes all mixed up.  Had I made the kit (instead of a model of a 3 plank) I would have ended up with a farce.

John


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I gave up on a Slaters wagon, John, for much the same reason.

This is how it ended up.


Allan




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:shock:  :hmm  :Red Card

Don't really know what to say.

John

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If I could be so bold, Allan . . . I think that you might have overdone the weathering a touch.

Just a touch, mind you.  :lol:

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I felt the same way, Max, and have toned it down somewhat since that photo was taken.

Allan.

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allan downes wrote: I gave up on a Slaters wagon, John, for much the same reason.



This is how it ended up.





Allan










Actually, I think you've been feeding it the wrong kind of mineral supplement!

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Readers will recall that I started an MMP kit of a LMS Dia 2109 Mineral Wagon some while ago.  The chassis proved to be a bridge too far so I cut my losses and put it to one side.

Never one to surrender and recognizing the goal is to obtain a model of said wagon, I went for Plan B, which is a Peco Mineral Wagon chassis.

I've been working of the wagon and here's where I am:



At least I was capable of soldering the body together.  A fiddly job with laminations and individual gussets.  I'm quite pleased with the result.

I'm also extremely happy with the Peco chassis.  I made a few modifications to make it look more like the LMS wagon.  Everything fit nicely and it is sprung by virtue of squidgy plastic springs.

It took me two hours this morning to remove the brass floor and fettle it so as to fit over the Peco floor.  Must think about that for my next one.

These were built in 1947 in two lots totaling 2,599 examples.  They had independent manual brakes on both sides.

I've also been building a Parkside mineral wagon.  The model is supposed to be a BR Dia 1/108, but as the kits notes say, the kit can be made into a LMS Dia 2134 by making a few mods.


These were built in 1948 and 1949 with 3,500 constructed.  Again, they had independent manual brakes.

I've been reading Martyn Welch's The Art of Weathering and will try his method.

Next step is an overall coat of spray matte black, followed by a coat of brushed on rust.  Then, you dab on blobs of Maskol, let that dry and brush paint the wagon grey.  Next you tweeze of the Maskol to reveal patches of rust and peeling paint.  We'll see how that works.

John

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Looking good John,
I have  diag 2109 myself that I bought by mistake by not paying attention on the old MMP website. I really ought to put it in the small ads because it's really too late for my era.

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Yep, who hasn't done that.  Or buying a kit of a prototype that was extinct by the time of your modelling era.  The 3 plank almost certainly was extinct by 1962 but Rule 1 applies here.

Thing is, the level of effort to produce the MMP body was pretty high, while the Parkside kit fell out of the box and went together like a breeze.  There's not a lot to choose between the two. 

John

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I sprayed the two mineral wagons black today so I need to leave them to cure overnight.  Did anyone notice that I put the brakes on the Dia 2134 wrong.  I only noticed as I was reviewing the post.  They are now correct.  Really!  Brakes can be a minefield and you need to have your wits about you.  Sometimes mine seem to go walkabout.

Anyway, I thought I'd have a go a weathering the 4 WR wagons that I recently finished.  I've sprayed all 4 using my airbrush.  I start with a light dusting of earth and follow with a light coat of black.

I have done the 3 plank though:





I think the weathering really brings to life.  It didn't really thrill me when I took the earlier pictures but now I think it's super.

I use three powders; rust, umber and black and layer these.

I start with rust on the axleboxes, springs, brakes and solebar.  I then follow up with umber in the same places but also on the metal fittings of the body.  Finally I apply black to finish off.  Powder is one of those things that you want to be careful not to use too much.

I used the fiberglass pen to polish the buffer heads and rub a bit of the weathering off the black patches (I reckon these would have got a clean now and then) carefully!  I also rubbed the weathering off the brake handle, again this would have been kept cleanish.

I used a silver pencil to highlight the door pins.

Happy days!  :chicken

John

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That looks very convincing, John.  :cool:

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OK, let's see if this one is convincing:





As the body was steel and it carried water, I gave it a rusty patina.  The weathering has disguised the ropy lettering as I had hoped.

John

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Yep.  Nice.  :thumbs

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Top notch, John.

But then would we expect anything else ?


Allan

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More powdering this morning, arguably getting as much on me as the model:



I forgot to polish the tyres - tsk.



John

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Last weathering project for now:





These are ready for delivery to their owner now.

John

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So, having had my fun with weathering powders, I turn my attention back to scrofulous mineral wagons.



I sprayed the wagons black all over yesterday and today I painted the bodies rust.

I was going to use Maskol but the bottle I have is I don't know how many years old and was unusable.

I recalled something I'd seen from the AFV modellers.  The overall rust coat is acrylic.  I repainted patches of rust (Humbrol red brown I think) and while wet, sprinkled salt on it as you can see.

This may go all pear shaped before I'm done.

The next step will be to apply grey paint and transfers.  When all is dry, I should be able to knock off the salt which will look like peeling paint with rust underneath.  Fingers crossed.

John

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Scrofulous - very apt, John.  :thumbs

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Stunning work, John. Just simply stunning.

Allan.

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They look like they have limpets attached John :mutley

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They certainly look like they've been struck by something not of this world.  I'm just in the process of completing construction.  They actually look like what I intended.  Pics soon.

John

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As promised here are the two minerals after painting and final construction:



I'm far from finished and final weathering should blend things together.

...and now for something completely different.

While waiting for paint to dry I decided to make a start on the Slaters GWR 18' 6" Cattle Truck.

The kit will make either a Diag. W1 with standard manual handbrake or W5 with Dean Churchward vacuum fitted brakes.  I will do the latter since I have photos of these in the early BR era.  W5 trucks were built between 1902 and 1911 with a total of 575.



There isn't a whole lot to do on the body beyond fitting wires and door catch.

The interior is painted using rattle can paint from the DIY store, nothing fancy.  Exterior has been primed.  The final colour is going to be bauxite.

I painted the floor concrete which looks to my eye a lot like natural wood.  I'll apply some weathering powder to give it a worn look.

I used 0.040' x 0.040" plastic strip for the roof battens.  Nothing was included in the kit.

John

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Brossard wrote: ...They actually look like what I intended.  Pics soon.

John

I know what you mean, John. It happens to me on occasion !


Allan

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Yesterday was spent on lettering and marking the mineral wagons:



The wagon number was assembled digit by digit, very stressful.

Still a ways to go.

John

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So, I've been splashing powder on the minerals and got this:





It's all about layering really.  The key to the effect is, of course the peeling paint.

The wagon on the right got an extra layer of black powder.  The one on the left left with more rust coloured patches.

I think I prefer the one on the right.

Opinions?

John

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Brossard wrote: So, I've been splashing powder on the minerals and got this:





It's all about layering really.  The key to the effect is, of course the peeling paint.

The wagon on the right got an extra layer of black powder.  The one on the left left with more rust coloured patches.

I think I prefer the one on the right.

Opinions?

John

I'm sure there's a lot more to it than just 'splashing about', John.


Lovely work as always. I can't get enough of Brossard builds !


Allan

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You've nailed the paint, John.   :thumbs

I can't separate them.

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I am going to be slightly contrary and say that I prefer the one on the left myself. 
That's not to say that there is anything wrong with the the other one though! 

I haven' done any peeling paint with rust patches yet, despite thinking about it. The nearest I have come is this.





Apologies for the highjack John

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Nice work, and done without powders I'm guessing.

I think the rust is perhaps too red on the left wagon, it should be dirtier.

John

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Super work as always John. The attention to detail and number alignment is impressive.
Does the water tank wagon filler cap need handling marks like the brake handles of the 3 plank wagon?

Cheers

Marty


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Thanks Marty.  I probably should have rubbed a silver pencil over the handle.  However, I've delivered it to the owner so it'll have to stay as is.

The white marks on the brake handles were to help shunters see them in the gloom of a yard at night, or so I believe.

John

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Brossard wrote: Nice work, and done without powders I'm guessing.


Hi John,

Yes, all done with brush painted acrylics cut back with meths. Which I had at the time just discovered allows you to do the same sort of cutting back as a cotton bud and white spirit with enamels. 

I have since discovered that IPA does the same. It's worth noting though, that both really need to be diluted with water a bit or they cut right back to the bare plastic if you are a bit over zealous - guess how I found that out :oops:

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Hi John,

Those mineral wagons - bees knees. The only thing that jumped out at me were the diagonal stripes, should be whiter on the rust than on the faded paint, when presumably somebody came along with the paint pot and brush and slapped it on the rust (otherwise the stripes would have gone the way of the grey paint).

Nigel

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Yes Nigel, well spotted.  I must have a think about that.  Either rub the powder off the stripes or distress them.

John

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Making mistakes is a great way to learn I think Rob.  I do a lot of learning in this hobby.

John

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I had another go at the minerals this morning.  I thought the black powder was maybe too thick so, I took some Qtips and enamel thinners and rubbed off the powder.  I then reapplied black, then umber powder mostly to the rust patches.  I also distressed the markings where the rust would have taken them away.



I think I'm a wee bit happier with them now.

John

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Superb John!

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Thanks Rob, I think these are keepers.

John

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Carrying on with the Slaters GWR Cattle Truck, I managed to get the brakes done:



Theh instructions were very frustrating because they are drawn as iff the floor is glass and looking down.  No-one (well I sure don't) builds an underframe like that.  I made a number of errors as my brain tried to turn the drawing upside down.

In any event, the brake arrangement shown is simplified.  I have collected quite a bit of info and discovered that:

a)  the W5 cattle wagon had several brake variations.  These include:
     - non Hayward, vacuum fitted, 4 shoes
     - Hayward, vacuum fitted, 4 shoe (this is the version I attempted to make)
     - Clasp brake version, vacuum fitted, 8 shoes, DCII
     - Clasp brake version, vacuum fitted, 8 shoes, DCIII



The kit is wrong as follows:

1)  the left most vee hangers should be spaced a scale 28", shorter than those on the right.
2)  no subframing, I added this but I'm not sure of the accuracy.
3)  I added trunnions to the vacuum cylinder as well as a representation of bolts.
4)  For manual brake actuation there is an intermediate slotted link between the main lever and the ratchet on the right.  This can be seen in the middle of the underframe.  It took me about an hour to make the link itself.
5)  The link from the leftmost lever to the rightmost has an intermediate support.

Here are a couple of close ups:





I found this to be very useful:

http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/65307-dc-2-brakegear-as-fitted-to-4w-wagons/

There are a lot of underframe shots showing some of the details I mentioned.

John



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Embarrassingly I have half a dozen of these in a part built state. 
One is mine and the other five I am building for a friend. He wants his to scale 7 with quite a few mods and I need to be in the right frame of mind to tackle them..

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Perhaps my efforts can be of help then Rob.  This is for a friend too.

GWR brake rigging seems to me to be a minefield.

I have a very good PDF, given to me by a kind soul on RMWeb, with excellent details of brakes for all manner of GWR wagons.  Email?

John

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My researches turned up that the interior of these wagons were unpainted.  I originally had thought that they were painted cream.

So:



I scribed the interior planks and used coarse sandpaper to give them some grain effect.  I started with Tamiya Panel Lining paint (very thin enamel wash).  Having let that dry, today I applied umber and black powder to get a grungy effect.

John

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Work continues of the cattle wagon.  I have painted the underframe black, added tiebars and a vacuum pipe:



I still need to install the springs and axleboxes.

John

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Underframe work seems to take the bulk of my effort and build time.  With that done, kit completion comes quickly:



The body assembly went well and fit is good.  I added the partition support.

I also fitted axleboxes and springs.  Care is needed to ensure that the rocking axle is free to move.

John

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I've also been having a go at Parksides' GWR Toad Brake Van.

I was amazed to find a plethora of pictures by googling "GWR toad interior".

I spent a lot of time on the interior:



Planks were scribed, benches made, door and hatch detailed with some strip.  The stove is made from bits and pieces of plastic and some brass tube.

Obviously you don't have to do this but I like to make my builds unique.  Besides I quite like the challenge.



The veranda floor had planks moulded but the van floor was plain so I scribed planks.  Usual method to get the wood effect.

John

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If I find the time to detail the interiors of my N gauge Toad brake vans you'll know that I'm getting to the point of calling my layout close to finished!
 Very interested in both of these builds as they are both represented on NE. Kept it coming.

Marty


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Cattle wagon was painted last night, it will need touching up.  I need to make a desk for the brake van, that's underway.

John

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Cattle wagon looking good John, and I really like the BV interior, even if it is from the wrong end of the country :mutley

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Yes, well, it's not for me but a friend of mine who follows that sort of thing.

John

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Further work on the brake van today.  The brakes are an ordeal but I got it done:



This is the veranda end.  There's a screw actuator that operates the brakes.  Note the safety loops around the yokes.  There's also a safety loop around the screw actuator.



Here you see the brake rod.  Also note the vacuum pipe.  I reckon BR would have added these (and pictures that I've seen bear this out) to make the van suitable for use on vacuum braked trains.  By the 60s the goods wagon fleet was being rapidly changed to vacuum braked.



This is the van end.

John

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I had a happy accident tonight.  I thought to distress the Toad interior and started to paint on the Panel lining paint.  Now the lining paint is mostly enamel thinner and the paint on the interior sides is also enamel.  To my dismay, the paint started to come off.  I left it to dry thinking I would have to repaint the thing.

However, when it was dry, I took a fiberglass pencil and lightly brushed with the grain of the planks.  The intention was to remove the existing paint so as to not have a too thick coat of paint on the sides.

Instead, I got a very good effect as the brown pigment from the lining paint got worked into the grain.

Viola!



I think it all looks suitably scruffy.  Note the desk on the door end.  The boxes on the hatch end are sanding boxes.  There is a similar arrangement at the veranda end.

John

Last edited on Wed Aug 30th, 2017 03:52 am by Brossard

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I finished the Cattle Wagon today:



Looking quite smart in ex works gloss varnish.  Now ready for transfers.

Screw link couplings are Dapol.  Vacuum pipe and lamp brackets are Slaters.

John

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Very nice John,
I do like happy accidents they enhance the pleasure of the build.

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Yep, this is how new techniques come about.

I've built the main cabin onto the chassis:



The parts are a very good fit.

I'm very pleased with the interior:



I've also been working on the veranda:



Sandbox operating lever.

John

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Terrific interior!
Marty

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Hi John,

Does all that come with the kit for the veranda detail or have you added it yourself?

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Hi Rob.  The kit includes ABS moulded parts for the sandbox actuation.  There's also a lever to fix to the door end that actuates the rear sandboxes remotely.  I don't plan on doing the rodding for that though.

Any ideas on making the roof removable?  I would thing crossed 0.5mm NS wire at the front and rear.  I have two concerns:

1)  In an absent moment someone could pick up the van by the roof and it may fall and
2)  The veranda end wouldn't be secured.  The end framing is pretty fragile by itself which is why I left the sprue for now.

John

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Hi John,
I have seen small rare earth magnet and tinplate angle used to good effect to hold van roofs on but I can't say that I have done it myself yet - it's on the list to try at some point.

Last edited on Wed Sep 6th, 2017 01:57 pm by Rob Pulham

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Well, I certainly never thought of that.  :hmm

In other news, I applied transfers to the cattle wagon today.



After giving the transfers some time to dry, I sprayed on Dullcote.

Slaters provide a sheet of transfers but only for the grouping era.  I had to cobble together what I needed from my Fox collection.

John

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Looks very good John, seems a pity to weather it...

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Hi John,

Now that really does look the part.

Nigel

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Yep, really quite pleased with it.  :doublethumb

John

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I got it into my head that a through piped brake must have some means for the guard to dump the vacuum, ie brake the train.

Looking around a thread on the Hornby AA15 model, I found several pictures that seemed to depict the thing I was after.

Here's what I've done:



The pipe is teed into the vacuum pipe under the van.  I don't know exactly what the red thing does, I assume it's a valve, possibly called a "setter".

I also added a vacuum gauge made from a slice of brass tube and plastic rod.  I have Roche's book of locomotive drawings and in it, there are drawings of gauges.  I scaled down a pressure gauge and used that.  Note the fine wire from the gauge to the valve.

I also added the sandbox lever and brake standard.

John

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I was wrestling with handrails over the weekend.  I can't think, off the top of my head, of other jobs that I have done that were as difficult or frustrating.



The real thing had 3/4" dia rails which scales to 0.44 mm.  I used 0.5mm NS because it is harder than brass and stays straight.

I found the template on the instruction sheet to be too short - after wasting a load of wire I made a gauge from plastic card for the length.

The verticals were still problematic since they need to be identical.  I offered up the long handrail to the short one to get these the same length in the end.

Of course, the brackets have to be threaded on before adding a touch of solder to the open ends.  I ended up using 188C solder because it's stronger than 145C.

The corner brackets are intended to fit into slots in the body.  Trial fitting with a gauge that spaces the wire 1.5mm from the body I found these to be too short to comfortably secure everything.  I made new corner brackets from brass that are 2mm longer.  I also had to fettle the slots in the body so that the brackets went in easily.

The guards door handle is spaced 1mm.

I finally got things fitted but it was still a fiddle.  I find that CA is a better glue for jobs like this than solvent.  It seems to set harder.

Handrails were primed and the painted bauxite.  This is still pretty rough.  I need to paint the rails white yet, I'll leave that for later when I no longer have to handle it so much.

I added lamp brackets today.  These are Slaters lost wax.  One went "ping" to Lord knows where so I made one from brass strip.  Plastic brackets are supplied but are intended to be butt joined to the body.  This is inadequate to me and they must be pinned for strength (as Slaters are).  I tried to drill the plastic bracket but they're too narrow.

I've also started the steps.  You can see hangers for the guards door.  Also the end hangers.  These are attached with CA.

I still need to add hangers in the center (where the white tabs are).  The plastic hangers supplied are supposed to fit in holes in the sub floor but were too large.  When I tried modifying one, it broke.  I bent some brass angle to shape.  In order for these to fit snugly I blanked off the holes and will re drill.

John

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After posting the above picture to my RMWeb thread, there was a good discussion about handrail thickness.  The spec. of 3/4" was felt to be the ID of standard gas pipe with the OD likely to be 1" or slightly more.  Certainly when I looked at photos the handrails look quite a bit thicker.

Soooo...I did it again.  I used nominally 0.032" (0.8mm) wire which, oddly enough, measure to be 0.6mm.  This is pretty much exactly what I was after.



The bodywork has taken a beating but paint covers a multitude of sins.

I've completed the build now.  The plastic step hangers were, as I feared, useless, but I wanted to give them a chance.  One of them snapped off when I lightly touched it during handling.  I made the outer hangers from wire, shaped to replicate the plastic hangers.  They're not perfect but I think they look the part and they won't break.

The central hangers are made from brass angle bent to shape.

The guards step hangers are brass strip, drilled and 0.5mm NS wire soldered in.  This looks a bit like bolts.

I also replaced the wimbly 0.5mm (which is actually 0.25mm) guards door handle with 0.020" wire (actually 0.43mm).

You can see I installed the buffers and instanter couplings.  I also added the vacuum pipe.

The roof is only on loosely, I'm wondering what to do with it - glue it on or leave it removable somehow.

John

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I've been painting the brake today which means a lot of waiting for paint to dry and cure.

While that is going on I decided to make a start on my MMP Dia 1/109 Steel Mineral Wagon.

Immediately after nationalization BR realized that there was a serious requirement for a massive investment in mineral wagons.  These would replace the aging and decrepit ex PO wagons and expand the fleet to cater for increased demand for coal (seems strange to be talking about demand for coal in 2017).

Anyway, about 250,000 steel wagons were built through the 1950s.  Most were welded (Dia 1/108 which I have yet to build) but around 10% were riveted, Dia. 1/109.

I made good progress with assembly today (I pressed out what seemed like a million rivets a while ago):



There are lots of overlays with rivet detail on the interior.  These are very thin sheets of brass sweated to the body, as are the stanchion back plates.

Lots of cleanup to do.

I killed my variable temp. soldering iron bit today.  I bought a cheap iron from my LHS on the recommendation of the owner who is an avid builder of brass kits.  However, as I feared, it lasted about 10 minutes before the bit turned black with oxidization.  Plan C was to break out my Weller stand alone iron with a new bit - much much better.  Moral is to spend a few bucks on a good iron, buying a cheapie will result in disappointment and could be why so many people complain about being unable to solder.

John

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Brossard wrote[highlight= rgb(248, 248, 248);].
The roof is only on loosely, I'm wondering what to do with it - glue it on or leave it removable somehow.

John
Hi John,
Neodymium magnets on each end of the roof, bits of steel on the body shell. All inside of course.

Nigel 


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Rob suggested the same thing.  As someone else pointed out, the roof forms part of the structure, especially the veranda framing which is very fragile.  I'm inclined to glue it, as I have done with my three brakes,  but will let my customer have a think about what he wants to do.

John


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I finished the soldering (I think) so all that remains is to stick on the WM parts and some of the really tiny brass parts.



It took me all day yesterday to do the side doors.  I attached the end door today and stuck on the WM framing with CA.  I also removed the floor and fettled to ensure that the Peco floor is a good fit.

These are obviously weel researched and, as far as I can tell (not having a lot of knowledge of the prototype) accurate.  Thing is, from my point of view, all this work doesn't add a whole lot more value than the moulded plastic Parkside kit that I built earlier.  The only issue is that I don't know of any other kitmaker that does steel mineral wagons, so if you want variety, it's MMP.

John

Edit: well I am quite wrong about steel mineral wagon variety.  Peco do a couple of kits of steel wagons.  Parkside do the 1/108 kit that I built as LMS dia 2134 and also the ex SNCF cupboard door version.  Dapol, ex Lionheart do both 1/108 and 1/109 RTR models.  :hmm

Last edited on Sun Sep 10th, 2017 02:55 am by Brossard

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A load of work and the Dia 1/109 wagon is essentially done:



The chassis turned into quite a puzzle as I worked how the brakes are arranged.  The Peco chassis assumes independent brake shoes both sides since the 1/108 and others have drop doors in the floor.  This wagon doesn't have bottom doors and the brake shoes are only on one side.  The brake shoe side is of a Morton type and you can see the clutch in the middle.  The brakes supplied were backwards so I had to reverse them.  Happily, I was able to use components from the MMP chassis to detail them.



The opposite side showing the lever.  These were taken from the MMP kit since the Peco levers were of the wrong type.  Note the cross shaft.

This will probably hit the paint shop tomorrow, same process as the previous two.

John

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It's a very interesting wagon, with all the moulded parts, John.

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My thought exactly Max.  The melding of brass and WM makes a very interesting vehicle.  I guess I'll start the final one tomorrow as I wait for paint to dry.

John

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This morning I fitted the windows using canopy cement.



I've attached the roof temporarily with black tack.  It isn't enough to get the roof at the veranda framing seated.





John

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Looking good John,
I know that they take time to put together but I do like the MMP wagon. I am sure that it will be very robust in service too.

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Yes Rob, they are time consuming but look good with it.  Thank goodness for Peco, doing the MMP chassis is a bit daunting.

I note that Peco/Lionheart have these in RTR form.  There's no obvious interior rivet detail on their 1/109 though.  However, MMP sell interiors.

Anyway, I think I have enough minerals, 3 ex PO and 4 steel (all different).

John

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I thought I'd weather a wagon:





LNER 12T goods van.

John

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After a few weeks of track laying and wiring (aaarrghhh!) I took a break to build a wagon kit for a friend.

This is a BR Dia 209B Shock Absorbing Van.  These were built in 3 lots between 1955 and 1958.  The design was based on Shock Absorbing Vans built by LMS/LNER/GWR.

I've almost finished the construction:



Three major subassemblies as you can see.  In life the van body would have "floated" constrained by the springs.

The roof has had rainstrips and end strips added from supplied plastic strip.

I'll take the opportunity to paint these separately before joining up.



Note the floor of the van body.  Safety loops are 1mm phosphor bronze strip - the plastic ones supplied are impossible to clean up without breaking.

Note the vacuum pipe from brass tube, secured on strips of plastic strip and brass wire clips.

There's a strut that supports the brake lever guide which is ignored in the kit, I made these from scap brass strip.

I must do the tie bar between axle guards.  The kit recommends plastic strip but that is way too fragile.  I'll dig up some brass strip.

John

Last edited on Wed Nov 22nd, 2017 09:25 pm by Brossard

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Looking good John, a bit too modern for me but am I right in thinking that it's a Slaters kit?

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Thanks.  Quite right Rob, it is Slaters.  Sadly, no transfers supplied.  I've ordered some from Fox.

John

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I must admit that I find it odd that they supply transfers with some but not all their plastic kits - Most confusing.

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Yes and annoyingly the website doesn't tell you if transfers are in the kit or no. :brickwall

Anyway, the subassemblies are now painted and drying.

John

Last edited on Thu Nov 23rd, 2017 10:34 pm by Brossard

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Brossard wrote: Yes and annoyingly the website doesn't tell you if transfers are in the kit or no. :brickwall

Anyway, the subassemblies are now painted and drying.

John

I hear you, it's not the greatest website in the world despite them stocking loads of useful goodies

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ShocVan construction is complete:





IAW my usual practice, the van has been sprayed all over with GlossCote.  Not only does this provide a smooth surface for the transfers but also tends to blend out minor blemishes.

Happily the transfers arrived yesterday - serendipity rules.

John

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That is very nice, John.  :thumbs

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Wow, you haven't messed about getting that finished and painted.
Can I offer the suggestion that you put a spot of solder on the links of the coupling chain, it improves the look no end.

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No moss on me Rob.  Y'know, I noticed the same thing after I took the pic.  I'll have to look into that.

The other thing I noticed is that the tie bars are very thin and should be flush with the outside of the axle guards.  I'll glue some plastic strip over the brass.

John

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When I ordered the ShocVan transfers I also ordered some 16T Mineral wagon transfers for my last two:



The ubiquitous Dia 1/108.



Rivetted dia 1/109.

Next step is to do the final weathering.

John

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I got the ShocVan transfers done yesterday.  I glued a 0.040" x 0.020" strip of Evergreen to the brass tiebars to fatten them up.  I really couldn't do much with the couplings because I couldn't get a good grip, so I put a dab of CA in the link gap.



The stripes were actually quite difficult because they had to lie over moulded detail.  I did use MicroSol.  I think I should trim their length but weathering will distress them anyway.



John

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I took the steel minerals in hand today and finished the weathering:









I used weathering powders - started with rust on the underframe and wheels, followed by black.  I then touched the rust spots on the body with rust and blended that.  I followed up with black to tone things down.

John

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Very grottily looking, it's mother would be ashamed of one of her kids being out in public looking like that  :mutley

PS... very nice indeed

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I'm starting another commission, this time a Connoiseur etch brass NBR 20T Brake Van.  It belongs to a friend who hasn't the time to build it.  This is all part of my scheme to seduce folk to 0 gauge.

Rob has showcased the model he built in his thread so I hope this won't be too repetitive.  Rob did kindly provide some drawings and photos which should help greatly.

Early days yet with the build and I've only been tinkering today.  I drilled the axle guards and instlled bearings.  I also drilled out the buffer housings which was a very painful exercise.

The kit:



Still taped to the backing :roll:

Castings:



Top L to R:  Chimney, brake wheel standards (don't know why there are two), duckets, buffers and lamps

Bottom:  Axle guards.

John

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I got some progress made on the brake:



Slot and tab construction, no drama.  There's still a lot to do.

John

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I'm working through the few wagons that haven't yet been weathered.  I just finished three:

Class B Oil Tank (for heavy oil like Kerosene and Diesel), Dapol



BR Standard Planked Van, clasp brake variant, Slaters



BR Meat Van, Dapol



I replaced the rigid plastic vac hose with a flexible vac pipe/hose set from Slaters.  The set includes lamp brackets and a buffer beam receptacle for the vac hose QR connector.  I also added the chalk plate.  Notice the lamp bracket is white.

John

Last edited on Wed Dec 20th, 2017 08:58 pm by Brossard

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I got a lot of detailing done on the NBR brake today:





The handrails were painstaking but not especially difficult.  Holes were pre etched so that helped hugely.

I used bending bars (ie a large straight file and C clamps) for the solebar and steps.

The fun and games will begin when I try to build the correct brake gear.  The kit is a tad sparse in that area.  Happily I've done these before on Parkside kits.

John

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One more wagon weathered, the Parkside LNER Cattle Wagon:



John

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I got on with the brake gear today and spent the session making the parts for brass offcuts.  I used Tatlow's drawing which shows the brake arrangement with reasonable clarity.  My experience with other brake gear helps too:



Now with wheels installed.  I preprimed these and wrapped tape around the tyres.



I've installed sub floors and soldered the hangers.



At right side you can see the gubbins I made for actuating the brakes from the hand wheel.  It should get clearer as I proceed.

Yes, I soldered the axle guards using 70C solder, ordinary non acid flux and my regular iron.  I don't hold with anemic 25W irons for this job, lots of heat and in and out quick sharp.

John

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I got the brake gear done today.  I spent yesterday and this morning and it was quite a challenge to work out the details.  I used the GWR toad mechanism as a guide.  I think I have it mechanically plausible.





John

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I have no idea, John - but it looks very convincing.  :lol:

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I forged ahead with some of the final details this afternoon:





Added the lamp brackets which are a bit of a pain as they are so small.

Also the duckets.  I made a template from plastic card and drilled holes.  I used the template to drill holes in the sides and castings so that these lined up.  I soldered wire through the holes and cut it off to about 2mm.  I then used CA and secured the castings.

Buffer guides are also CAed in.

Roof is on loosely, I still need to finagle it.

To those who say you can't see the brake gear, I disagree.

John

Last edited on Mon Dec 25th, 2017 03:07 am by Brossard

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NBR brake has been primed and painting started.  I just need to get a decision on colour from my customer.

In the meantime, I completed a couple of commissions:

GWR Dia V5 Cattle Wagon





BR Shoc Van





I can deliver these today.  :doublethumb :cheers

John

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Very nice John. :thumbs


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I had a buffer issue with the Toad yesterday and had to replace the guide.  All done now:





Guard is from ModelU.

John

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:thumbs :thumbs 
I liked the pins to attach the duckets.

Nigel

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Over last several days I have been slowly painting the brake van.  Today I think I can say that I'm done:



Guard is a ModelU figure.  I used blacktack to fix him in place.

Note the sand pipes.

Roof is on loosely.  When the time comes I think I'll use blacktack on this too.



Buffers were a pain because I should have assembled them first.  :It's a no no





Floor is 0.020" plastic card, scribed and painted.



Note the sand box in the corner.

The van has a couple of coats of Testors gloss spray.  Next up is transfers.  After that some matte varnish and then glazing, which I was working on today.

John

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Excellent, John.  :thumbs

Black tack is a new one on me. Interesting Google results.

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I am finding it to be a versatile and useful substance.  It grips strongly but things can be pulled apart easily.

John

Happy New Year Max, you're already in 2018.

Last edited on Mon Jan 1st, 2018 01:37 am by Brossard

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In a moment of weakness last week I ordered Hattons' Warwell.  I'm not entirely sure what I'll use it for, perhaps farm vehicles.

http://www.railalbum.co.uk/railway-wagons/military/ww2-50-ton-warwell-1.htm





I’m very pleased.  The chassis feels diecast so lots of weight.  The vacuum brake gear is well done.  The screwlink coupling works – maybe too well since I had to screw one of the ends back in.  I applied Threadlock Loctite to stop that happening.  Note the safety chains.  Must look into the buffers, the clipped top should be straight.



My guess/speculation is that the manufacturer is actually Dapol/Lionheart.


John

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It's quite nicely detailed, John.

You're right about the buffers.  Can you turn them?

It looks like they had holes in their centres, as well.

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The buffers are just a bit sloppy Max.  Yes the real thing appears to have holes in the center.  :hmm

John

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Hi John.  Teriffic job. Which reminds me, I have a brass 4mm Etch model awaiting.my attention. My one, if I ever get around to building it, is a London Transport , Hurst Nelson brake vat by RT Models as used with the ex GWR Pannier tanks on engineering trains. I have had a look at the Etch and there are several fiddly pieces which is putting me off doing the job, one day but next the paint job, I have purchased the correct transfers. Best wishes Kevin 

Last edited on Sun Jan 21st, 2018 02:31 pm by Passed Driver

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Good to hear from you Kevin.  Doing etched kits has a lot to do with figuring out how to handle the fiddly bits.  There's nothing wrong with fixing small, non load bearing parts with CA.  You'll want to arrange things so that all the soldering has been done before using CA.

Let me know if you have questions.

John

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Thank you John .  That sounds like a good idea. Best wishes. Kevin

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Stunning work as usual, John.

Keep it a coming, mate. Always look out for your posts.


Allan

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I got the transfers for the NBR brake yesterday, I can finish it now.  :chicken

Another Parkside kit on its way from Antics. :doublethumb

John

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Finally got the NBR done.  After putting on the transfers my customer said something like, "oh by the way the ends were vermillion".  That set me back.  Anyway he brought over a tin of the paint he wanted me to use:





The roof is held on temporarily with black tack.  My customer will weather it himself.

I have to say the red ends are striking.

John

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Another project that I have come up with is to make up a milk train.  I have ordered a 6 wheeled brake kit:

http://www.crtkits.gbr.cc/product.php/394833/

Today, I received two Dapol tanks and a Corgi road tanker:



The milk tanks are OK.  I had thought about getting a Slaters kit but the transfer choices didn't include MMB which I felt was appropriate for early 60s.

There is no brake detail underneath but I can add that readily enough once I figure out what it looked like.  I also need to see how far these are from the LNER tank and perhaps do some nurdling.

The road tanker is second hand and missing mirrors.  I can reinstate these from wire I reckon.

John

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Hi John

I see a dairy looming.

Nigel

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Not quite Nigel.  I don't have the space.  I was thinking of a vignette with the road tanker on the off side platform using a portable pump to transfer milk.  I have a picture of that very thing so it did happen.

According to Paul Bartlett, the milk tank model development was well under way before Richard Webster (Lionheart) stepped in to bring them back on track.  At best they are LMSish so I've been searching Pauls collection for pictures of LMS examples.  I still would like some info on how the brakes were arranged.  I think I have the experience to interpolate if I have to.

John

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"Interpolate"


Rather a posh word for an YMRC member wouldn't you say, John ! :shock:

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If John's interpolation results in an adventitious and harmonious interpretation, without of course resulting in a superfetation, I say goferrit!

Nigel

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Wot 'e sed.

John

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Clodpolls we ain't. 
Nigel

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I had to look up clodpoll - some things make it worthwhile getting out of bed.

This erm discussion brings to mind one of my favorite characters:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4HvCRM2xjjY

John

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BCDR wrote: Clodpolls we ain't. 
Nigel

Sounds like a vote for village idiot of the year, John !

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Candidates like this:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jF-CkMpQtlY

John

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Reminded me of the parish council. 
Nigel

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I started building a Parkside 10T LMS Banana van.  Only 100 were built between 1925 and 1930.  Originally they were steam heated to help the bananas ripen before hitting the shops.

In the 1950s BR did away with steam heat since the insulated nature of the vans was sufficient for ripening.  The steam pipes were kept as through pipes to enable the vans to run with other steam fitted stock.  Finally the steam pipes were removed in 1963.

Here's where I am:





Vacuum and Steam pipes are brass tube, the actual dia was something like 2".  I used 0.032" brass wire for clips.  I cobbled up a drain cock for the steam pipe from bits of plastic tube.  This is based on a drawing of a meat van in Bob Esserys LMS Wagon Drawings.
 
Phosphor bronze wire is the vac pipe connection to the cylinder.
 
I glued a stip of plastic to the back of the brake handle ratchet and made a reinforcing bracket from scrap brass.
 
Oddly, these vans didn't have tie bars between the axleguards.

John

Last edited on Sun Mar 18th, 2018 03:43 am by Brossard

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This afternoon I assembled the body to the underframe.  I got a good fit but care is really needed to ensure this.  In particular the solebar ends need to be fettled to slot in the end buffer beam.





Some construction methods that I use.  Corner brackets to ensure body squareness and reinforcing bars to stop the body from bowing in.

Also self adhesive weights to raise the wagon weight to the requisite 1gm per mm of length.  I think ~150gms.



Anyone who has built a Parkside kit in 7mm will be familiar with the whitemetal cast vacuum and steam pipes.  I really don't like them and, in the past, have substituted Slaters lost wax items.

This time I thought I'd see if I could do something with the kit parts.  My biggest beef is that the "bag" looks crude and oversize.  I cut the bags off and substituted Slaters springs, a much cheaper option.

You can see I drilled and glued a piece of wire in the vacuum pipes.  This will locate the pipe to van end.  I also drilled and glued some wire where the the hose connection meets the standpipe.  I also drilled the hose connection enabling me to join them.

John

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A project I've been putting off for some while has come to the fore.  Reason being I plan to attend the Great British Train  Show (GBTS) near Toronto in April, so I need to get some prep done.

I want to make removable coal loads for my mineral wagons.  I started this morning by cutting out card to the appropriate size for 7 wagons.

I made an 8th to use as a mockup.



I glued foam to the underside and then shaped it until I got what I think is required.



Mockup in a wagon.



Applying pressure to one side or the other will tip the load for easy removal.

More to come.

John

Last edited on Mon Mar 19th, 2018 08:17 pm by Brossard

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Looking good John, initially I thought that the shape was for the shape of the coal pile in the wagon - I have seen people do similar in the past with layers of styrene to create the basic shape for the coal which they then covered wit just a thin layer or coal rather than a heap.

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Good point Rob.  I guess I'll see how things develop.  You realise I'm making this up as I go along.

John

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I spent some time this morning cutting out card and gluing it.



I've made them specific to each wagon.  Currently in paint.

John

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With the paint dry I glued on pieces of foam and shaped them to provide the basis for piled coal:



I also made tape ID labels.

John

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The banana van came together fairly quickly:




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Hi John,

Nice idea 're the sloped bottom on the coal. Following on from Rob's comment, one or two? (That is heaps, not lumps).

Nigel

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I've done the coal today Nigel, now waiting for glue to dry.  I lined the wagons with plastic wrap.  One hump for these small wagons.  21 tonners would get two.

John

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The banana van looks good John.
I like the idea of labelling the loads for the different wagons too.

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Thanks Rob.  Despite the wagons being very similar in size, they are not identical.  It would be more convenient if I could have made generic loads.  Still, I don't have many to manage.

John

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Hi John,

One hump or 2 or even 3, seemed to depend on the type of coal. Most photo's of 10 or 12 tonners show 2 distinct humps from the 2 chutes per wagon at the screens/storage bins, especially with small nuts and slack. Less pronounced with large lumps which look like one hump. Gas works and small house coal were sometimes loaded using 3 chutes giving 3 humps. I know calcined iron ore was also loaded into 10 tonners using 2 chutes per wagon.

Nigel

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Well, it's done now so it'll have to be one hump. :lol:

I'll take pics in the morning as I unwrap.

John

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Here's the result of my coaling up:



The plastic wrap worked well.  Not my idea, I saw it somewhere.

Some of the materials I used:  PVA, IP Alcohol for wetting, coal and a pot of dilute PVA mixed with soap and IPA.  I used a pipette to dispense the dilute glue.



Loads removed.  The glue is still wet where air couldn't get at it so I'll leave them to dry thoroughly.

John

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They'll do nicely, John.  :thumbs

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Hi John,

You can drill some 1/16" holes into the coal to get the drying moving along. Looks the business. M620356 is definitely from the "Humphrey" mine.

Nigel

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Good idea, they've been drying all day, I'll take a look to see how they're doing.  The Humphrey mine thing is quite a bit of trivia.  I had no idea.

John

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I have completed my coal loads:



Showing the various stages.

John


                 

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