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Water Treatment Plant.- Perry's Scratchbuild. - Scratchbuilding. - More Practical Help - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Sat Feb 16th, 2008 11:00 am
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Robert
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I have copied and pasted this from the old forum and it is all Perry's work, not mine.


This is the edited version of my Water Treatment Plant scratchbuilding project from the old forum:

The Mad Scratchbuilder of old East Walsham town strikes again!

The urge to build came over me again today after I had been perusing a book entitled ‘LNER Sheds In Camera’.

One of the photographs showed a water tower with a water softening plant adjacent to it and another small building. It looked as though the three would make a nice group, rather than just have a water tower standing alone.

One of my previous posts on this forum showed a water tower I had ‘kit-bashed’ from a Dapol water tank and a Superquick tower. It was only ever meant as a stopgap, but I had thought it might suffice at least until the track was laid. It hasn't but no matter!

Because I had made plans to rebuild it, it was no problem taking it apart. I had made the water tank a simple plug-in fit to the tower.

Looking at the photograph of the prototype the thing that instantly stood out was that the water tower depicted was a lot bigger and taller than the one I am planning. I therefore decided to try to represent the plant in proportion with the tower rather than in strict keeping with the prototype. To build one as shown in the photo would result in a group of buildings that would look far too large for my layout. I claim modeller’s licence!

I decided to build it out of plastikard (surprise, surprise) as far as possible. A close look at the photo revealed that the base of the plant was octagonal, as was the platform at it’s top, whereas the tank itself was cylindrical.

Using my favourite size of plastikard for making up basic structures; .040” (1mm), I drew an octagon by marking a circle of the required diameter with a pair of dividers, then using the centre point marked by them, I used a protractor to mark off 45 degree angles all round. Where the 45 deg. lines met the circle I made a small indentation with a compass point, just to enable me to locate the tip of my knife blade accurately. I scribed between these points with a sharp knife before snapping off the waste pieces, leaving me with a fairly accurate octagonal plate.

I measured the sides of the octagon at about 20mm. Having cut a piece of .040” sheet to the height of the base structure, I then cut it up into 20mm wide pieces. The long edges of these panels need to be bevelled so that they will meet when formed up around the octagonal plate. A piece of sandpaper was laid flat and each of the long edges was rubbed gently back and forth until a suitable bevel had been obtained.

To strengthen the base unit and also to make fixing the panels in place easier, I glued a small triangular fillet to each segment of the base as I worked my was around, fitting the panels one at a time. Taking a bit of time over this was worthwhile as the resultant fit was not too bad. This basic structure will not be visible in the completed model as it is only to serve as the support for the embossed brick plastikard that will clad it in due course. The last panel to fit was the trickiest and needed, as we say in the trade, a little bit of ‘fettling’, just to make it a snug fit. All the vertical joins between the panels were brushed with liquid solvent on the inside, and then when they had dried sufficiently, again of the outside. The picture shows the first few panels in the process of being fitted together.



Two larger octagons were cut from .040” sheet. These were laminated together to form the platform that sits atop the base.

The tank itself looks to be of a slightly lesser diameter than the base unit. I rolled some .010” plastikard sheet round a suitable former and secured it along the join with several pieces of masking tape. For the former I used a piece of cardboard tube that happened to be in the bits box and was of about the right size but anything cylindrical of the right size would do. Once the 10 thou sheet was well and truly taped up, I carefully slid the former out then ran a brush full of solvent along the inside of the join. This was given ample time to dry before the tape was removed and the outside of the joint completed.

The following picture shows the inner walls of the water tower temporarily held together with tape whilst proportions are worked out. The old Dapol water tank tanks sits on top. The beginnings of the base unit, platform and tank have been stood in place, just to get an overview of how it will all fit together. There is to be a smallish building sited between the two current structures and lots of pipework, railings, etc. to be made too.



Hindsight being the wonderful thing it is, I decided to laminate the water softener tank with an extra thickness of .010” plastikard sheet, but this still only gives a wall thickness of .020”; half a millimetre. Although the cylindrical section together with reinforcing and locating discs top and bottom is quite rigid, I realised that I may run into problems later when I come to fix ladders and pipework, etc. To that end I decided that the best course of action was to leave the original cardboard former inside the cylinder when it is finally sealed up. One needs a sparing touch with the solvent when working on .010” stock or anything thinner; you can soon end up with dents and dimples where the plastikard has begun to dissolve. Still, metal tanks tend to get the odd dent in real life so I don’t worry too much! The lamination was carried out by cutting a piece of plastikard long enough to give a 6mm or so overlap, then taping it tightly in place with masking tape. I use masking tape a lot for temporarily securing parts during a build. It’s cheap and reusable to some extent. Once the lamination was in place, the strip of tape at one end was temporarily removed and some solvent brushed under the overlap. This was held in place until the solvent had almost dried, then the tape was reapplied. After some drying time the other end of the overlap was treated in the same way, followed by the middle and finally the two sections either side of the middle. When all that lot was dry, the tape was removed and the join checked. A spot or two of solvent will secure any bits that were missed, but don’t overdo it or it may all come unstuck again!

I have also made the basic carcase for the small building that will stand between the two other units. I will post a photo of the progress of the group soon.

The Water Softening Plant is making steady progress, with the construction of the small building that fits between the water tower and the Softening Plant itself.

All the buildings were made from 040" plastikard and cladding with .020" embossed brick plastikard has begun.

The round vent on the end of the small building was made by marking out the size of hole required with a pair of dividers, then drilling a series of small holes around the inside of the marked line. The waste was cleaned out using a craft knife followed by a half-round needle-file. A scrap piece of plastikard was glued behind the hole and then small pieces of microstrip were glued in place to represent the ventilating slats.



The arches over the water tower windows were made using the 'Easy Arches' technique described in the 'Hints and Tips' section of this forum.

The window frames were printed out onto a transparent sheet in readiness.

I cut sixteen panels of brick embossed plastikard, each 60mm x 20mm and divided them into pairs. One of each of seven pairs then had the window reveal cut out, whilst the other had a larger area cut out to provide an area of raised brickwork evident on the prototype.These were glued together in their pairs and then brick sills and lintels added. The eighth pair was modified to provide a doorway. A piece of .040" plastikard was glued beind the door opening, creating a recess. The doorframe was added from microstrip, as was the rainstrip The door itself was made from a scrap piece of 'planked' plastikard.

As each of the wall sections needed a window fitting to it, I needed to paint the inner edges of the window reveals before attaching the transparencies. I gave all the wall sections a quick coat of slightly thinned Humbrol brick red paint to provide a base for the final painting stages later. When this was dry, I mounted the window transparencies on the back of each wall section using pieces of sellotape cut to a width of about 5mm. The subsequent gluing in place of the walls will help to keep the windows in place permanently.

I used a tube of polystyrene cement applied with a small wooden spatula to glue each wall section to the octagonal base, leaving an even narrow gap between each one. Before the polystyrene cement had set hard, I eased each wall section into place so that the gaps were as even as possible. I then glued a piece of .020" x .030" microstrip down each of the small gaps with liquid solvent.

There are some raised courses of bricks to be added at the top of the base unit, just below the platform, but this won't be done until everything has had 24 hours to dry thoroughly. There has been a lot of solvent and tube glue used today!



The small building that stands between the water tower and the softening plant has had a small amount of work done on it. The walls have been glued together and a door has been constructed using the same technique as mentioned above, except that the door has been 'panelled' with microstrip. The walls got a coat of the thinned brick red too, seeing as there was enough left over from the other job.

This is how it looks so far. Not too much difference to the 'untrained eye' perhaps, but I know how much work has gone into it today! :shock:



According to my reference source, a plant at Retford Shed was, quote, "one of dozens scattered about the LNER system", unquote.

Because of the damage done to loco boilers by hard alkaline water forming limescale; like your kettle furring up, I suppose, there was a policy of moving locos around to different areas to try to balance things out by going to areas that had soft, acid, water for a while.

This was obviously difficult to sort out so water softeners were built at some hard water locations. I believe the water was treated with perhaps a forerunner of something like the modern day 'Calgon'. Whatever it was, some sort of sludge by-product was formed during the process. This sludge was hauled away in old redundant loco tenders at some locations.

I thought it would make an interesting piece for my railway because it is likely to prompt questions like, "What on earth IS that thing?" :shock:

I also thought it would enhance the more usual solitary water tower scene, but I had to build a rather reduced sized model. The one in the photo I am using for reference is beside a three-storey water tower. The plant could treat 7,500 gallons per minute. It was BIG!

It's a fascinating subject that I would like to know more about. Perhaps I'll get round to researching it further someday.

All the windows and doors have been completed and fitted. The small building has been firmly glued to the end of the water tower, and a roof and guttering affixed. The gutters were made using the scraper technique described in the 'Hints and Tips' section.

It was discovered that the Dapol water tank was slightly distorted; it didn't sit flush on the top of the water tower. The bottom of the tank was rubbed on a sheet of sandpaper which was laid on a piece of glass and was soon flattened off.



Detail work on the softening plant building has commenced. A series of holes was drilled to take the stanchions for the safety rails and access platforms were added to the top and middle, braced with microstrip to give the appearance of the prototype.

Everything now needs to be given time to set really hard whilst I figure out how I'm going to build the curved ladders. :?



Still loads to do on this model. The main buildings have still only had the base coat of brick red paint applied, but extra drying time is never a bad thing.

If I don't come up with a cunning plan for the curved ladders over the weekend I can still get on with the painting. There's no rush to finish.

I think perhaps I should start this post with the warning 'Viewers of a nervous dispostion should look away now'!

I decided how to build the open style stairs that go up the side of the water softener tower. I would build them open style. :grin:

I glued a piece of 2mm x 1mm plastikard to the side of the tank that will form one side rail of the top set of stairs. I then shaped a second piece of 2mm x 1mm to form the outer rail. Having cut a 9mm wide strip of .040" plastikard, I then cut this into strips approximately 2mm wide to make the individual steps. These were glued on one at a time, aligning them by eye, and leaving plenty of drying time every couple of steps.





Here I have propped up the partially built stairs so that you can see the construction in progress.

The first set of stairs have been completed and fixed in place.



A reinforcing strip of plastikard was glued at the edge of the steps, securing them to the wall of the tank, and handrail stanchions were added from plastic rod.

The second, lower set of stairs has been started using the same method.

The making of these stairs has not been the nightmare I thought it might be. They have gone together quickly and easily and no-one need be deterred from having a go at something similar. I'm pretty sure that the more sets of steps and stairs that one makes, the easier they become. Even if practice doesn't make perfect, it certainly makes things easier. :)

A simple straight ladder will provide access to the lower platform from ground level. It will be nice to make something that doesn't curve in several directions at once!

I have yet to decide how to represent the handrails. I am considering using stretched sprue or fine wire, but sprue tends to be difficult to bend without breaking at times. A problem with wire is that it really needs fixing in place with epoxy resin. The five-minute variety is OK but it doesn't set quickly enough on the model for rapid working. Then I find it sets too quickly in the mixing pot. :cry: I may make a small mock-up with a few stanchions and see what works best before starting work on the model itself.

The lower stairs have been completed and installed and the ladder from ground level to the platform has been built.

Everything needs to sit for a while now to let all the solvent dry out completely.



The next step with be trying install the safety rails around all the stanchions.

I felt like I was building staircases in my sleep last night. :shock: And yes, before you say anything, I know they look like I made them whilst I was asleep.! :roll:

After all that fiddly construction I feel I need to do something else for a while, so I'm going to make a start on painting the water tower later today.

I need to find a flat piece of 3mm plywood to make a base for this group of buildings. I considered mounting them on a piece of .040" plastikard but feel there's a strong chance that it would warp, if not because of the solvent I would use to fix the buildings in place, then due to temperature changes during the year. Plastikard is OK in reasonable sized pieces, particularly if it's braced by other pieces attached to it, but a large sheet on it's own is not very stable in my experience. At least a piece of ply could be screwed to the baseboard securely, allowing removal of the buildings later should the need arise.

The two curved stairs I built are far from perfect even though I spent a lot of time on them. Still, a dab of paint here and there can hide a multitude of sins. :oops: By the time all the pipework is in situ, there will be too much to look at to worry that a step or two is slightly out of kilter (I hope!). :D

I have decided to use wire for the hand rails. I found some scraps of multicored stuff that I used to wire a railway 30 years ago. How's that for not throwing anything away!? I stripped the insulation off and used single strands to make the railings, clove-hitching to the first stanchion, then winding it around each one in turn. One row in the middle and one row nearer the top were connected up and then a dab of solvent was put on the stanchions to stop the wires sliding up and down. The sixteen stanchions around the platform were connected up first and I even found I got quite quick at it in the end. I have since started on the railings at the top of the tower. I've experienced a couple of breakages with the stanchions here, but it's not too difficult to redrill the holes and pop new ones in. It just slows things down when you have to stop to let the glue dry. When they are all done there will only be some shortish ones up the stairs to do.

OK, so I lied. The painting got put on hold today as the urge to get the railings done overcame me.

As can be seen from the photo below, the two wires at the foot of the stairs are yet to be attached. They will be fixed to a stanchion on the platform when the tank is finally glued in place.



The wire I used will need generally poking and prodding into shape to get it to look it's best but there isn't much point in doing that until I'm ready to paint it. Otherwise it will only get disturbed by handling in the meantime.

Apart from the pipework yet to be added and the paintwork to be finished, the main job is nearly complete. There are always more details that can be added afterwards though.

Quick progress update:

The 'mortar mix' coat of paint has been applied to all three buildings the same way I did it on the warehouse model. It's a bit scary when I do this even now, because the model that I've worked long and hard on looks absolutely awful, all pale and patchy. :cry: Still, I think it's a worthwhile step because the dry-brushing that follows is set off a treat by the pale grey of the 'mortar' showing through from underneath. Note: If you try this, I have found it essential to apply a base coat of whatever brick or stone colour is required first, then the 'mortar mix'. Both coats need to be very dry before going any further. I have mentioned this by way of a warning before, but if you don't let it all dry properly, all the colours and shades will mix together into one horrible mess. It's due to the fairly high levels of thinners used in the paints. It's not an irretrievable mess, but it takes a lot of work to recover from and the end result is never as good. So, my friends, make haste slowly.

Further to yesterdays update, I finished slapping on the 'mortar mix' coat last night and left it overnight to dry after wiping off the excess with a paper towel.

Re-reading my previous post, I'm not sure I made it plain enough that the base coat must be really dry before attempting to add the mortar mix coat. Otherwise it all turns pink! :cry: This in turn needs to be really dry before going any further.



Today will see the start of the dry-brushing process to bring out the texture of the surface and restore some colour.

I tried using some tile paper for the roof of the small building but didn't like the result. It looked like exactly what it was; a piece of printed paper. I tried sticking the odd 'dislodged' tile on it to give a more three-dimensional effect but still didn't like it. I have therefore removed the paper and will be either using embossed roof tile plastikard or making tiles the way I did for the G.E. Signal Box project.

I have considered individually laid tiles, but the main problem is the time needed to cut sufficient numbers and to make them accurately dimensioned within a reasonable time frame. I haven't figured out a way of doing it.....yet! :wink:

My Water Softening Plant has taken a week to go from this:



.................................to this:



I have done the bulk of the painting now, but the final stuff won't be done until I have installed the pipework and other detailing.

The tower part of the plant looked as though it was going to be a real pig to brush paint so I opted for a coat of aerosol acrylic grey primer, the sort one sprays DIY car repairs with. I used a cardboard box as a spray booth (very posh!) and stood the model on an upturned flowerpot tray, one of those things about an inch deep. That made a handy turntable so that I didn't need to touch the wet model. Two minutes later I had a nice even coat all over the model, even in those little hard-to-reach places. Yes, we've all got them, haven't we?

The primer dries quickly so a little later I was able to paint the stanchions and railings with a 'not-quite-pure-black' colour, pure matt black being too strong for small models in my opinion. It never looks right to me.

The brickwork of the base of the plant and the other two buildings were dry brushed with varying mixtures of brick red and black with a little grey added here and there.

Although all three buildings were painted in a similar manner and in similar colours, I painted each one separately with fresh mixtures of paint. This ensures that they don't look as though they were all painted at the same time. In reality the buildings would in all probability have been built at different times with slightly different materials. I wanted my models to reflect this, but in a subtle way. (Good grief, that sounds pompous! :oops: Sorry.)

The small building was re-roofed (after the tile paper fiasco) using Slaters roof tile embossed plastikard and now looks heaps better. Downpipes were added to the ends of the gutters and the access ladder for the water tank was fixed to the end of the water tower.

Here are a couple more views of the (almost) completed group of buildings.





I can't get much further now until I can buy some 3mm ply to make a base for the buildings. I need to fix them in place in relation to each other so that the connecting pipework can be made up. When I have figured out how that all fits together I will need to add a few other little details and complete the painting, then it should be 'job done'!

The Water Softening Plant has now been glued to a small piece of plywood and some pipework and a general bit of 'dirtying up' has been carried out.

The pipework is not strictly prototypical, partly because I don't feel the need to fit any more, but also the photo I worked from doesn't really show much more than I have installed. I think the pipes give it an industrial-type look and the general impression of the type of building shown in the reference photo.

The pipes were made from plastic tubes of various diameters, cut at an angle to fit together. I found in necessary to reinforce these joints with short lengths of wire pushed into the tubes with a drop of epoxy resin to hold it all in place. The flanges they are bolted to on the water tank with were represented by circular scraps of plastikard glued in place. I used epoxy glue for these as they were glued on after painting. Also, epoxy resin has good gap-filling properties; useful in this instance where the wall of the tank is not flat.



An access hatch was made from scrap plastikard and detailed with microstrip before gluing it to the top of the tank and painting it.

The whole tank was roughly dry-brushed with various colours and streaked with 'rust' to try to represent a well-used structure that would stand in a steam-era loco depot.



The base was not painted as it will be dealt with in situ whan the unit is installed on the layout.

Well, I think that just about wraps up another scratchbuilding project. :grin:

I hope you enjoyed it.

Perry



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 Posted: Sat Feb 16th, 2008 11:07 am
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Sol
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Bob, me being a newbie to this forum - not the old one, this is a good idea of presenting some of the older topics like this from the previous forum.

Perry, very well done - how long did it take you to build this? Even preparing this topic initally would have taken some time.

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 Posted: Sat Feb 16th, 2008 11:13 am
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phill
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What a build and it answers my question in your layout thread as well. I really must try this in the future when funds allow.
Phill

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 Posted: Sat Feb 16th, 2008 11:14 am
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Perry
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First of all, thanks to Bob, for 'resurrecting' this old project - I had lost it!

Sol,

It took a week or so of spare time, I guess. I don't keep a log of how long things take; it would probably scare me! :shock:

Perry



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 Posted: Sat Feb 16th, 2008 11:34 am
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Gwent Rail
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Nice one Bob :!: :!:
I had assumed this project had been lost in the few months of postings that we could not retrieve, brilliant to have it back on :!: :!:

Sol
You'll see that a lot of information was transferred after the crash, but the last few months of entries were lost.
As an example, a quick scroll through my personal layout thread will reveal a page of condensed posts (complimentary / social posts deleted)that were transferred from the old site, until we arrived here:- then some updates from my own computer back ups of the thread (which I always write in MS Word).
I'm afraid a hell of a lot of work of this sort was needed by the "old" members at this time, but we got away with retrieving most of our information.

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 Posted: Sat Feb 16th, 2008 11:45 am
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Wayne Williams
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Perry, what a project! I had not seen this before.

I can see where you struggled with keeping the steps parallel to each other. While I have never tried something like steps (yet), I have given them serious thought. Do you know of ANY material that could set adjacent to a plasticard joint, prior to the application of the solvent, and not be bonded at all to that joint? Hopefully it's a material that can be shaped to fit specific areas (like the gap between steps?)

Wayne



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 Posted: Sat Feb 16th, 2008 11:58 am
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Perry
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Wayne Williams wrote:.......I can see where you struggled with keeping the steps parallel to each other. Wayne

Bob and I mentioned this project when we met at the Warley Show. I think we agreed that it was not one of my better jobs! :?

Wayne Williams wrote:............ Do you know of ANY material that could set adjacent to a plasticard joint, prior to the application of the solvent, and not be bonded at all to that joint? Hopefully it's a material that can be shaped to fit specific areas (like the gap between steps?)

Wayne


This is something I haven't experimented with, Wayne. I'm guessing that some kind of metal might do the job, but making it exactly the right size to begin with might be tricky.

Perry



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 Posted: Sat Feb 16th, 2008 12:25 pm
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Maybe an old metal comb :?:



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 Posted: Sat Feb 16th, 2008 04:44 pm
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That is a superb piece of modelling Guv.

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 Posted: Sat Feb 16th, 2008 07:21 pm
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Nice to see that one again :)



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 Posted: Sat Nov 1st, 2008 07:02 pm
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There is so much good stuff on this forum, I'm gradually getting through it, but this is super, I just know I'd have had a breakdown doing the steps!

Great job.



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 Posted: Sat Nov 1st, 2008 07:24 pm
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dooferdog wrote: There is so much good stuff on this forum, I'm gradually getting through it, but this is super, I just know I'd have had a breakdown doing the steps!

Great job.


The camera shows up every little (and not so little :oops:) discrepancy on a model and the wonky steps don't seem as noticeable when the building is on the layout as they do in the pictures (fortunately!). Even so, I can't say I was overly happy with the result. I recall speaking about it to Bob at the Warley Show last year, and I think we agreed that this wasn't one of my better efforts at scratchbuilding. However, when it's placed on the layout with other buildings and locos, etc., in close proximity, I think it will serve it's purpose until I get the urge to rebuild it. With the benefit of hindsight, I will probably use a slightly different technique next time. I'm pretty sure that 'Plastruct' do some ready-made steps that I could cannabalise to get a much better effect. I didn't want to reinvent the wheel when I made them from scratch but couldn't find an alternative at that time. They were a bit of a nightmare, I must admit. This project was not one of my most successful, but I did learn a lot by building it.:thud

Perry



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 Posted: Mon Nov 3rd, 2008 11:16 am
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Perry, a quick question if I may.

The above text refers to "Easy Arches" and I remember I was going to ask you the question when you first posted it many moons ago, but sadly never got around to it. The "how to" (still available in the index) is terrific but I just needed to confirm a) that you scribed the arches on the reverse side of the plastikard brick sheet and if that is correct b) was there a reason for this other than the colour of the material?

Les



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 Posted: Mon Nov 3rd, 2008 09:19 pm
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Perry
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Les wrote: Perry, a quick question if I may.

The above text refers to "Easy Arches" and I remember I was going to ask you the question when you first posted it many moons ago, but sadly never got around to it. The "how to" (still available in the index) is terrific but I just needed to confirm a) that you scribed the arches on the reverse side of the plastikard brick sheet and if that is correct b) was there a reason for this other than the colour of the material?

Les


No particular reason, Les. I did scribe the reverse side of some embossed brick plastikard in that thread. I could just as easily have used plain white .020" plastikard with a similar result, although it might be easier to get an even coverage of paint over material that was all the same colour. Looking back over this thread I noticed I used white plastikard for the arches on this model. I was probably using off-cuts from the 'bits box', as I don't like to waste too much material.

Perry



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 Posted: Tue Nov 4th, 2008 06:42 am
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Les
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Thanks Perry, I thought that may be the answer but I wanted to be sure.

I hope you didn't mind me asking what you may think of as a basic question but I am working my way up through various degrees of difficulty to eventually reach scratchbuilding. I started with Scalescenes, then Metcalf, then a Ratio kit and I am just finishing a Wills Craftsman series engine shed. The last is the nearest I suppose I will get to scratchbuilding before having to take the plunge so I'm keen to know the details at the moment. I must say I find your instructions much easier to follow than those supplied with the kits and it's great being able to ask a question.:thumbs

Les

 



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 Posted: Tue Nov 4th, 2008 07:34 am
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Les

I have built a Will Craftsmans kit !, the station building, and apart from the windows and doors ( already molded ) and the plans, I feel that there really is not a lot of difference between that and scratch building, I would have thought that the time to build both is around the same as well, but and I do agree with you Perry's instructions are a lot better, mind you so is his building techniques.

 

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 Posted: Tue Nov 4th, 2008 08:01 am
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Not sure why you don't get excited about this build, Perry. I reckon it's a beauty. I can easily overlook any perceived errors [in fact I can't even see 'em] because of the unique character of it.

Mike

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 Posted: Tue Nov 4th, 2008 11:41 am
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Alan wrote: Les

I have built a Will Craftsmans kit !, the station building, and apart from the windows and doors ( already molded ) and the plans, I feel that there really is not a lot of difference between that and scratch building,  


That's encouraging Alan, thanks.:thumbs

Les



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 Posted: Tue Nov 4th, 2008 03:36 pm
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Les wrote: .......................I hope you didn't mind me asking what you may think of as a basic question................
Les

 


No question is ever considered too 'basic' or a 'daft question' on here. It's the essence of this forum; we all help each other when we can. I'm pleased to be able to contribute a little now and again.

If there's anything else I can help with, don't hesitate to ask - on the forum or by PM.

:cheers Perry



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 Posted: Tue Nov 4th, 2008 03:44 pm
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MikeC wrote: Not sure why you don't get excited about this build, Perry. I reckon it's a beauty. I can easily overlook any perceived errors [in fact I can't even see 'em] because of the unique character of it.

Mike


:lol::lol::lol:

I'm afraid I'm one of those strange, boring people who very seldom get excited about anything. I tend to take everything in my stride. Unlike SWMBO who can't sleep the day before a holiday, I tend to wake up the following morning and try to remember what the hell I'm supposed to be doing that day!

I have a reputation at work for being the author of the saying, "I don't do excited."

I think 32 years in the Emergency Services has taught me not to panic but the offshoot is I don't get that excited about anything either.

Oh, and by the way, if you can't see the errors in my work, YOU NEED SPECTACLES!!! :mutley:mutley:mutley

Perry



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