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A Windmill from card. - Scratchbuilding. - More Practical Help - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Thu Jul 21st, 2016 12:27 am
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col.stephens
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This tower mill is based on the surviving example at Bembridge on the Isle of Wight.  I emphasise that it is 'based on', not a slavish copy.  For a start, the real mill is built of stone which appears to have been rendered at some stage in its long life.  Following two renovations, the mill currently exhibits rendering on exactly half of the building.  Holiday postcards in my possession are all taken from the rendered front of the mill and show the building in an attractive pinkish buff colour.  I decided to model the building as if the whole of the base was rendered, which it probably was at some stage.  Photos of the mill can be found on Google by searching for 'Bembridge windmill'.

I decided to make the mill from card, as much as is possible, so started with a sheet of white 2mm card.  I found an old picture on Google which has a human figure in front of the mill.  I assumed that the figure was about 5 feet 6 inches tall and used this to calculate the approximate dimensions of the building.  The base is conical in shape and worked out at about 31 feet high and 26 feet diameter at the bottom, narrowing to 16 feet 6 inches at the top

How to make a cone?  I decided to cut out two circles, one for the bottom of the cone and another for the top.  These would be joined with central stiffeners.  The parts were drawn on the 2mm card and cut out...





Firstly, the stiffeners were fitted to the base...






...and the top was fitted...






A strip of thin card was also glued down the edge of one of the stiffeners as shown above.  This will be at the rear of the model and will provide a firm base for the two ends of the outer skin to be glued together.


More soon...

Terry



 


 

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 Posted: Thu Jul 21st, 2016 02:14 am
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allan downes
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It's looking better than my windmill already !

Allan

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 Posted: Thu Jul 21st, 2016 03:30 pm
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Marty
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Following along Terry, 
Might be a good technique for building those tapered cylindrical chimney stacks too?



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 Posted: Thu Jul 21st, 2016 03:30 pm
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col.stephens
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I don't believe that Allan.

Hello Marty. I guess it might work.



Terry

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 Posted: Thu Jul 21st, 2016 04:30 pm
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col.stephens
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Thin card would obviously be needed to form the outer skin of the building - card which could be rolled without creasing, but which is strong.  Cue the large size empty cornflake packet.  Clearly, if you are making a cone, you will need to draw two curved lines running parallel to each other, one of which will have a smaller radius that the other.  I'm sure there is some mathematical formula which will give us all of the answers, but I took CSE Maths twice and got a grade five, twice!  That's just above a fail.  You get a grade five for spelling your name correctly at the top of the exam paper!  So, I adopted the practical approach.  I made a pencil mark on both the base and the top, making sure they were in line with each other.  I placed the model onto the card with the pencil marks touching the card.  I then slowly rolled the model along the card whilst pushing a pencil against the base where it touched the card.  When the pencil mark did a complete revolution, I stopped.  I repeated the process with the other end and, when finished, joined up the ends of the lines...





Cut it out and this is the result...






I decided to draw and cut out the windows and door at this stage,  as it's obviously easier to do this whilst the outer skin is flat...






Work was required on the reverse side of the outer skin to give the impression of the thickness of the walls.  Four small strips of card were glued around each aperture and three strips of card around the door...





Obviously the windows would have to be glazed before the outer skin is glued in place because, with both a top and bottom to the model, there will be no way to access the inside afterwards.  But before glazing is done the model requires painting. So, it was off to the shed to search for paint of a suitable colour.  I came across a pot of Revell flesh colour, a kind of pinkish buff, and ideal for the job at hand.  I brush painted the model and when dry, gave it a dust over with some weathering powders...




A small piece of clear plastic (recycled packaging) was stuck over the rear of each window aperture using 'Cosmic Shimmer', which is an acrylic glue, much loved by ladies of the crafting fraternity...




Next, one end of the outer skin was glued to the strip of card previously put in place for the purpose...






The outer skin was gradually glued into place and the remaining end glued in place to abut the other end. A small segment was cut out of the base just behind the door aperture to allow the door to be slightly recessed when fitted.   Further detail work is now required around the windows and the door requires fitting. So, this is where we are at present...





More soon.



Terry

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 Posted: Thu Jul 21st, 2016 04:52 pm
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Marty
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Nice, clear "how I done it" Terry

Keep it coming



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 Posted: Thu Jul 21st, 2016 10:08 pm
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Chubber
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Huzzah for Packeto Cornoflako!!!

Never mind the Maths Grade 5, you obviously then went to the University of Common Sense....

Looking forward to the rest of the build, have a look in a DIY place for the sort of sturdy plastic mesh sold to keep birds out of spaces, might do nicely for the sail lattices?

Doug



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 Posted: Thu Jul 21st, 2016 10:54 pm
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col.stephens
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Thank you Marty.

Thank you Doug.  Praise indeed from The Master.  Good tip re the sails.  As usual, I haven't thought too far ahead in this build but I was considering a visit to the local pound emporium to see if any suitable plastic mesh was available.

Terry

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 Posted: Fri Jul 22nd, 2016 12:08 pm
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Ken
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Terry, this is terrific!    I too love making buildings in card (in N scale) and I'm very impressed with the way you've gone about this.   :thumbs:thumbs:thumbs

Ken

 



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 Posted: Fri Jul 22nd, 2016 07:31 pm
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Petermac
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Now that is a genuine "corn" mill. :thumbs

Wonderful approach to the most difficult part of the tower Terry.  Struggling for your Grade 5 was obviously a waste of time - as Doug said, you can't beat common sense. :cheers



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 Posted: Sat Jul 23rd, 2016 10:31 am
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col.stephens
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Thank you Ken and Petermac.  Very kind.  I hope to get on with the upper part of the building today.  Currently searching out some good quality card.

Terry

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 Posted: Sat Jul 23rd, 2016 01:20 pm
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jimmy styles
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Looking really interesting keep it up

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 Posted: Sat Jul 23rd, 2016 03:50 pm
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Chubber
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col.stephens wrote: Currently searching out some good quality card.

Terry


Hi again Terry,

Recently needing a relatively small amount [ 2 x A4] of a pale green card of good quality and finish, I was loath to buy a big sheet of 'almost right' stuff so chose instead some page dividers for ring binder files. [The pieces with a row of perforations down one side]

Designed to withstand handling they proved ideal for the recipe card index box I made for a chum.

Hope this idea helps, no doubt available in UK at Smiths or Staples?

Doug



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 Posted: Sun Jul 24th, 2016 11:02 am
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col.stephens
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Thanks Jimmy.

Nice tip Doug, thanks very much. 

Terry

 

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 Posted: Sun Jul 24th, 2016 12:11 pm
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col.stephens
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Window frames were cut from thin card, coloured with a felt-tip pen and stuck in place on the surface of the glazing. 






The door was cut from a rectangle of mount board and the frame and planking scribed thereon.  A quick wash over with a couple of felt-tip pens and a handle of bent wire completed the job...







The next job will be to tackle the rather interestingly shaped roof. Must give that some thought.




Terry




 

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 Posted: Sun Jul 24th, 2016 01:01 pm
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Just been looking at some pictures Terry, I take it the wheel at the back of the roof is something to do with turning the roof to get the sails into the wind ?

Ed



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 Posted: Sun Jul 24th, 2016 02:43 pm
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Chubber
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Ed wrote: Just been looking at some pictures Terry, I take it the wheel at the back of the roof is something to do with turning the roof to get the sails into the wind ?

Ed



This may be relevant...

http://l7.alamy.com/zooms/3faed909c7b34f6691ec5454990910e6/the-cap-turning-wheel-of-a-windmill-against-a-blue-sky-ax954r.jpg


Fragment from an Essex County Council treatise...

The main structure of the tower mill is built of brick or stone and so cannot be rotated. Thesails are mounted in a separate wooden cap which is arranged so that it can turn on the top ofthe tower. This cap is rotated either by hand, usually using gearing worked by chain frombelow or by a drive from a fantail.

I love windmills!  The most common local French type still standing comprise a cylindrical tower with a slate covered conical cap which rotates when pulled around from the ground by an attached beam. To manage the effort the miller uses a portable windlass, anchored to the ground at various places, called a 'goat'.

Watching with interest,

Doug



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 Posted: Sun Jul 24th, 2016 02:45 pm
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Chubber
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Apologies, Terry, I jumped in there....:oops::oops:

D



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 Posted: Sun Jul 24th, 2016 04:26 pm
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allan downes
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My take on geometry.

If it don't fit, hit it with a hammer until it does.

Allan

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 Posted: Mon Jul 25th, 2016 10:50 pm
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col.stephens
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No apology required Doug.  My knowledge of this subject is not that extensive.  Very useful photo by the way.  Thanks for the link.

Terry

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