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gormo
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 G`day Folks,

 This is not an in depth topic on weathering techniques and I am only a mug at weathering, a newbie and I don`t have any before shots, only afters.....so sorry `bout that, but here we go.

 Right, I was lucky enough the other day to win some wagons on that well known auction site. My fleet of goods wagons is severely lacking and I`m in the process of building it up. The wagons I purchased are in near new condition and were obtained at a very good price.

 Here they are below

 



 So that started me thinking on more additions. I have two quite old Hornby wagons. The plastic coloured, no frills, wide wheeled, big flanges, large tension lock suckers that you would see on every young lads train set. The thing is they have all the detail...the planks and bracing and rivets are all clearly defined......they just need a lick of paint.

 I went to work on the first one with acrylic paint...brushed on...no airbrushing...and used the brush for the first base colour as a way of imparting a timber grain to the planks. I then added thin layers of different colours in different areas to achieve the look I wanted......dirty...been through the mill a few times too many and had a hard life look.....isn`t that what weathering is all about??...I also added new small tension lock couplings and a load of coal. The coal load is the added using the foam rubber fill method, with a thin layer of coal glued to the top of the foam rubber.

 Here`s the first one......originally this was a bright orange plastic colour and the wagon and the chassis needed fixing together.








 I have to go out and get some grade OOOO steel wool to remove the moulding lines on the buffers and then detail them accordingly. I also need some transfers to add some number details.

 Armed with confidence, I had a go at the second one. This one was a medium blue plastic colour...like the McVities wagons....and it had a couple of issues with the buffers. I`ve sorted one out but I don`t think I`ll bother with the other.....these wagons are rustic work horses.

 Here`s the second wagon.



 Notice the broken buffer on the right





Here are some shots of the two together





 There you have it. This is done with artists acrylics brushed on intially. The dirty effects are done by using a sponge with the acrylics and creating a stippled effect and then smearing the stippled area with the dry end of the sponge. It can be done quite quickly as well.

 Now I have to see if I can take the plunge and dirty up my new wagons???

 Anyway....the point I am trying to make here is that old stock can be given new life and look pretty good next to the crop of new products we have at our disposal. It just takes a little patience.

:cheers  Gormo

Last edited on Sun Mar 22nd, 2015 11:02 am by gormo

Bob K
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A vast improvement, especially the change of couplings, which makes them comparable to much of the RTR stock that is available today. Bob

mattc6911
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Nice one Gormo ! You quite often see these beat up old wagons on sale in the bargain bins at swap meets quite cheap. Think I'll be looking to grab a rake next time I see them before your tip gets out and the market sky rockets :)    Even if they have old crappy wheels and original couplings they would still make a good static display tucked in a siding
Cheers
   Matt

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Looking good Gormo :thumbs

I bet they would have been priced at twice as much looking like that.

Are you going to have a go at a loco ?


Ed

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G`day Folks,

Thanks Bob, Matt & Ed.

Yes Ed...I am going to have a go at a loco. I have my son`s little Smokey Joe from his childhood days. He`s told me to do what I like with it. So far I`ve added weight inside the boiler and also removed the front coupling and replaced it with a small Bachmann tension lock.....it looks better already. I want to rub it back and remove the obvious joint lines and the lettering and respray this one. Then there`s cab detail and a crew etc... Then dirty it up a bit.

:cheers  Gormo


PS...this is exactly like what I`ve just been weathering.

 http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Triang-Hornby-Railways-OO-Scale-open-plank-freight-wagon-Scrap-yard-7459/121286434630?hash=item1c3d3c1f46

Last edited on Sun Mar 22nd, 2015 03:06 pm by gormo

Ed
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Got some like that Gormo, so another job on the to do list.

This is an example of what I mean about buying whethered wagons.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Lot-of-3-x-Hornby-PCA-Cement-V-tank-wagons-Unboxed-Weathered-/281619649185?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_3&hash=item4191d6d2a1

I make it just over Au$64


Ed

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They do look good Gormo, but if I had to pick one out and award a prize, it would be the 2nd wagon, the first wagon comes a very close second. Great job on the weathering. :thumbs

Whilst weathering, why not give the isopropyl alcohol and weathering powders technique a go as another option for weathering. These wagons below were treated with isopropyl and powders.



Cheers, Gary.

mattc6911
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On the subject of weathering, I have some photos of narrow gauge engines and rolling stock to put in the heritage prototype photos section at some time, but two or three of the photos I took specifically because they showed the weathering on a couple of tank wagons. Would it be worth having a thread in here JUST  for prototype photos showing examples of weathering ? So anyone coming to this section would have some handy reference photos to browse without searching all over ?  I'll find and post an example here when I'm on the laptop later










photos added  apologies for the quality, they were snapped on my phone and I havent had time time to go back with a decent camera

cheers

 Matt

Last edited on Sun Mar 22nd, 2015 05:08 pm by

gormo
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G`day Folks,

 Yes I see what you mean Ed, weathering equals premium pricing. I guess you`re paying for someones time and effort but I like the satisfaction of doing it myself and let`s face it....it`s not that hard???. I think the hardest part is to get over putting muck all over a brand new wagon. With these old cheap wagons it doesn`t matter, they can only be improved, so we can use them to condition ourselves and improve our skills and then move into the big time.!!!:roll::roll::roll:

Gary you method is tops and I will eventually move into that method or a combination of methods. I remember seeing your tank engine in the flesh with the realistic stains and rust etc....brilliant...pictures don`t do it justice. So now I`m crawling into weathering...eventually I will walk...but I`ll get there. Thanks for your assessment....I agree with what you say...I think #2 is better as well.

Matt your idea is a good one .....all sources of information are useful as reference material especially pics. These days it`s unlikely to see working vintage rolling stock in a weathered state, they are usually pristine, straight out of the box jobs, fully restored all sparkly and shiny. Therefore any pics showing weathered vehicles would be a bonus. I think it should be a stand alone topic though then members can add to the resource. Actually I may have some pics somewhere too.????

Time to hit the sack.....#3 Grandson, the littlest one, is coming early tomorrow for babysitting with Gran & Pop, whilst Mum goes off to work.

:cheers  Gormo

mattc6911
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That's what I was thinking Gormo , not sure if its possible to put a stickied thread at the top of the weathering section " photos of prototype weathering " or something like that ? So we can add any we have ?
Cheers

 Matt

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Hi Gormo,

You've made a great inroad into mastering the art of weathering. These wagons look really convincing.

Top job.:pathead

Toto

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They look very good, Gormo.

Very convincing.  :thumbs

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This thread is now stuck at the top of Weathering - Gormo... OK if other YMRers add to your thread?

gormo
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Yes that`s fine Sol....no problem

:cheers  Gormo

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This is a fantastic thread. I love how simple you have kept it easy to read and understand and a great look to your wagons well done! I'm working a 18 hour shift tonight my get some old n gauge wagons and have ago at old ones I don't use anymore, because of the difference between new and old!

 

Tom

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 G`day Tom,

 Thanks for the comments.

 Yes mate ...have a go....with old wagons it doesn`t matter really. As I mentioned I`ve used artists acrylics brushed on, but brushed on thin. If you think you`ve overloaded your brush, wipe some off onto some scrap card or whatever first , and then take the brush to the wagon.

 Actually it`s probably a good idea to have a couple of practice runs on the scrap card so that you get the feel for it.

 Something I don`t think I`ve mentioned earlier, is that to make your muck stains look even more convincing, you can moisten the end of your finger and smear the area with a downward stroke. Not too much moisture though, just enough to smear the top layer a little.

 Post some results on here when you`ve had a go at it.

:cheers  Gormo

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You should be very pleased with those Gormo - I know I would be. :thumbs

gormo
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 Thanks Peter,

 Yes I am pleased. The result is good but the boost to confidence with such projects is even better.

:cheers  Gormo

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 G`day Folks,

 Some pics from Bristol docks 2013.....may be helpful for weathering.



























:cheers  Gormo

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Great pics Gormo. :thumbs 

I have many pics of New South Wales rollingstock, unfortunately no one here models the NSWGR.. :sad:

For a complete file of BR rollingstock photos, don't forget Paul Bartlett's site :

http://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/paulbartlettsrailwaywagons

Cheers, Gary.

Last edited on Tue Mar 24th, 2015 08:39 am by Gary

gormo
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 Crikey Gary,

 That`s a handy link!!!

:cheers  Gormo

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Meant to ask Gormo, did you thin the acrylics with water or were they straight from the tube ?

Ed

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 G`day Ed,
 Straight from the tube for the major colours. I used Burnt Sienna for rust and decided to water that down...it was more or less washed on and spread to suit.
 Technique is really up to you but once the base / major colours are in place, I tend to add the muck as thin layers. The acrylic dries fairly quickly so it`s best to work small areas and then you can manipulate the paint before it goes off.
 Sounds like a video demo might be appropriate.???
:cheers  Gormo

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Thanks Gormo.

[Anybody noticed that this thread doesn't show up when you select 'Recent Topics', have to go to the weathering forum to see new posts (oh err).]


Ed



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It's now an "important" topic Ed and will stay at the top.

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Thanks Alan.

Ed

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  G`day Folks,

 I thought I would present you all with a video demo showing the methods I am using at the moment. This is just my way of doing it at this point in time. I am open to any new or existing ideas and at some stage further down the track I intend to have a go at Gary`s method. I have seen the results of his work in the flesh and they are extremely good.

 Anyway these vids are much longer than my normal offering, so settle down with a packet of crisps and a beer or two. If you are sick of watching the telly or you`ve become bored with watching paint dry or watching the grass grow, you may find this a little less boring......hopefully..:roll::roll:

 There are three videos to cover the one project and some still photos to better show the results of the weathering.

Part 1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dk2qzIt8lkA



Part 2

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7XWJ2HncU_o



Well I was not entirely happy with the roof after this session so I put a coloured wash across it and dabbed it semi dry with some foam rubber. I also treated the walls of the wagon with the wash although you`d barely notice. You can see the shine on the wet roof below.











 The combination of the wash, the paint and the foam rubber has left a rough effect on the roof which resembles surface deterioration......a happy accident!!

 So then we move onto the next part involving work on the chassis and wheels.

Part 3

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8HhSATO20UM



 This is how the roof turned out after the wash had dried....I am quite pleased with that!!



Some end detail prior to the chassis being painted.



A view of the side and chassis and wheel detail



Buffer treatment



A better view of the chassis and wheels



Bachmann couplings fitted







 And ready to roll



 Well there you go folks.....I hope the videos don`t put you to sleep and I hope you gain something from them.....I think those couplings need weathering too.????:hmm:hmm

:cheers  Gormo


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Hi Gormo,

I've only looked at the stills at the moment as the battery on my I Pad is about to go but I will catch up with the videos tomorrow night.

The wagons look great. You have really taken well to the art of weathering in such a short space of time. Keep up the good work. This is going to be a great reference thread.

:nice

Toto

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Hi Gormo,

That's a pretty decent job for an 'ordinary lookin wagon' ! The techniques you have used are quite simple and safe. Being water based acrylics, the paint could be washed off if you think you have made a meal of it.

The roof and end walls on the vent van came up a treat after the application of the wash. I like it. :thumbs

I'm guessing you were not happy with the roof as the paint brush marks could be seen through the sponge applications, prior to adding the wash ?? One thing I learnt in my art classes many years ago, was when painting anything rectangular, paint across the shortest distance. This reduces the chance of elongated brush strokes, along the length of the rectangle.

Could I suggest with the application of white paint on the body sides, drag your sponge horizontal with the timber planks, then sponge downwards. This should give an effect of individually weathered and faded timbers. ;-)

All in all, a great tutorial. :doublethumb

Cheers, Gary.

Last edited on Fri Mar 27th, 2015 01:56 pm by Gary

gormo
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G`day Gary,

I`m glad you like the vids and thanks for the painting tips. That makes a lot of sense, I`ll try that next time around. I anticipate my next project with rolling stock will be a crane. I have a TYCO American version, which with a bit of conversion and persuasion and a paint job, would look OK sitting in the sidings as a maintenance train. It will need considerable mods as it sits too high at the moment and can`t clear my mouse holes.....but I think I have the answer for that......out with the cutting tools:thumbs

:cheers  Gormo

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Hi Gormo

Finally got time to watch the videos this morning (well it is here) :thumbs

My only question is, when do you know when to stop weathering.

Bet the temptation is to just add a bit more, and then just a bit more, and then ..........................

Think the van looks brilliant. It's not just had a rough life, it looks like it's about to be condemned :mutley


Think you should leave the 'little ripper' as it is, or only a light weathering.

After all, some wagons would be new or nearly new at any one point in time.


Ed



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G`day Ed,
Ah!!! the all important question....when to stop???...I guess that depends on the condition of the wagon and what you want to achieve.
These first steps into weathering for me are a boots and all approach because the wagons were just old crappy, train set, plastic, ordinary, bargain basement jobs that normally wouldn`t get a second look as viable stock to run on my railway.
Items like my little ripper will attract a more measured approach if indeed I decide to weather that quality of wagon at all.
At the end of the day the amount of weathering on any wagon is optional.
:cheers  Gormo

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You've nailed it, Gormo.  :thumbs
Thanks for the videos.  Hopefully I'll be able to find them again if I ever get around to weathering mine.  :mutley

Correction:  That should read, "WHEN I get around to weathering mine."   :lol:

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Cheers Max,
No worries mate!!
Gormo

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Hi Gormo,

Very nice weathering. One source of "inspiration" that I use is the 'PO Wagons" series. Up until the mid-1930's most PO stock had legible and intact lettering even if it was dirty from coal and track dust - the wagon was after-all advertising the PO (although Hornby and Mainline wagons with often fictitious brands should be verified).  Post 1939 and into BR transition (P numbers) they just got dirty(ier) and weathered. Faded lettering, often just an outline, and unlettered/unpainted replacement planks were quite common. Even more so on stock in private yards. I've found with Mainline wagons that the lettering can be faded to an outline using 99% IPA and a cotton swab. In most cases the outline was overprinted on the background color, giving a thicker paint. See below for a pair of Mainline CWS wagon given the IPA treatment*. Limonene-based products should give the same effect (Goo-Gone or similar). Alternately some 1000/2000 grit emery paper gives the same effect but takes out the outline as well. Both methods give a polished surface that of course needs weathering. Not sure whether the IPA treatment will work with more recent wagons.

The other thing that needs addressing on these older models is the position of the brake shoes (see below). Unless re-gauging to EM or true scale gauge they need moving in, especially if fine-scale wheels are used. One of the idiosyncrasies of OO/16.5mm gauge where the body is 4mm scale and the wheels OO gauge.  Modern OO offerings have the brake shoes over the wheel tread, which of course now have to be moved out for EM/true scale gauge.

The other alternative is full-sided decals, printed and already faded. DIY or outsource the design to Robbie's Rolling Stock. Older wagons tended to have just one running number. I'll be using this approach for the P numbers on grey sided wagons (Dapol), as well as the CWS wagons, as I'm modeling WR/BR 1950's transition. I'll post when done.

Nigel

*The NEM knuckle couplers have since been changed for fine-scale ones, and the magnetic trip pins removed.





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G`day Nigel,

Firstly apologies for the delayed response. I`ve been away on holidays.

Your methods and information are very interesting and in depth. Anything further you can add will be much appreciated.

Thank you

:cheers  Gormo

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Hi...
 A few years ago I got a Tri ang 6 ton crane very cheap and using a small brass fret from the link below concerted it to 10 ton version replacing the wheels were a bit of a challenge. But I think iit was worth it.

http://www.metropolitanrailway.co.uk/Triang_crane_conversion.html



I made the hook from lead flashing...



A piece of lead on the hook keeps the line taught.



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That's a beautiful model, Alan.

Well done, you.  :thumbs

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I have to agree with Max,

That`s an excellent result Alan

:cheers  Gormo

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Hi Gormo,

The weathering was done with powders (rust, white, red, brown, black) and a large sable brush*. No acrylic paints - in my hands it overpowers, and looks like, well, acrylic paint. If I want a dusting of track dirt  I use the airbrush under v. low pressure (5 psi or thereabouts) before using weathering powders.

I don't often tackle vans, but reference to the prototype is useful. The roof on a van was normally a plank/canvas affair, and in the days of steam would have been covered with a layer of cinders from the engine. paint the roof the desired shade of grey, and then use a regular Kleenex-type  tissue (the cheaper and rougher the better). Glue one ply to the roof with matt water-based varnish (Micro Sol or similar), crumple as required at the edges and ends (use a tooth-pick) and let dry. Follow with a dilute coat of paint (shades of grey) and a light dusting of home-made weathering powders while the paint is still wet. Do not finish with varnish (even matt). You want it gritty. Thumb and finger application from above. Horse vans were nearest the engine, so more weathered. Guards vans the least weathered.

I use pastel sticks from the local art shop - black, grey, brown, black, orange, red - and a coarse file or scapel blade to make coarse powders. About 1/50th of the cost of commercial powders. Use a fine file for finer powders. In the 1920's-1930's the cinders would have been light grey/black (high quality Welsh or Lancs/Yorkshire steam coal), in the late 1940's-1950's all sorts of colors from the low-grade imported coal. Hence the orange and red pastels.

Covered loads. In the days of the individual companies a black canvas tarpaulin with the initials of the company, a number and date of manufacture (month/year) would have been used, tied down with ropes to those bits of ironmongery on the chassis. Buy them or make your own, suitably weathered. Use thin photocopy paper (20 lb weight), design in Word, Powerpoint or Corel Draw (I use Corel Draw), print and then randomly fold, refold and refold. The idea is to break the paper fibers and end up with something similar to tissue paper.  Place over the load (I use old Lego blocks, infinite variety, light weight, and the scale is right on) and glue the tarpaulin to the sides of the wagon. Add tie ropes if desired. I print eyelets. Vary the background color (new almost black, 5 years old a very light grey), add dirt/oil/grease stains, etc. when designing, not after printing. A coat of varnish in a depression followed by some 2-part 5 minute epoxy gives a pool of water. They can be folded and and the corners glued so that they just sit over the load. I'll post when I can find the file and templates (and some wagons to practice on).

Nigel

*Turn the air-conditioning off. Otherwise questions will be asked about the red/black/orange/grey dust that suddenly appears on the furniture. And wear a good face mask. Most of the oranges, reds and browns are iron-oxide based, and can be quite inflammatory if inhaled.

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Great tips Nigel.

Your methods must achieve an extremely high level of realism.

:cheers  Gormo


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Hi Gormo,

Thanks, but I'm an average modeler. I belong to the 3 foot society (as in "if it looks good from 3 feet I'ts good enough for me...", which corresponds to about 75 yards in 12" to the foot). I try and keep my weathering minimalistic (hence the choice of weathering powders as the medium), and check photo's before starting. Heavy weathering, rust, limescale, etc. was not the norm except for some very specific periods (late WW-1, WW-2, 1945-post nationalization, steam/diesel transition). Some examples I have show a rake of dumb-buffered pre-RCH mineral wagons at an iron ore mine in 1908 where the name of the owner is barely discernible through the coat of dust, and an assortment of PO mineral wagons in the early 1930's at the same location that are spotlessly clean or that have just a fine coat of track dust. Exactly the opposite of what would be expected. Labor was cheap pre-WW-1, economically impossible for most of the 1930's.

One thing to keep in mind was that PO wagons were requisitioned by the government during WW-2, bought at a fixed price and never returned to their owners. The MOT dictated the building of steel sided 16 ton wagons during the war (some 50,000 wagons according to the online cyclopedia). Running wooden RCH PO wagons in a 1950's freight would be anachronistic if adhering to the prototype. A coat of grey paint and a P (wood) or B (steel) number was the norm. Very few PO wagons were built post-1945 and even less post 1948. Another point is that steel sided mineral wagons were being built in the 1930's, including some 20 ton, 8 wheel (2 trucks) models.

Heavily weathered, rusty, lime-scale caked steam engines were found during the last years of the steam/diesel transition (1958-1962), as maintenance/cleaning was banned by management. Many pictures of clean and shiny engines from this period are misleading. Enthusiasts would descend on an engine shed at night, clean an engine (paraffin and rags), and then take photo's of the engine heading a train the next day. Old "Big-4" passenger and freight cars were also neglected and dirty as new BR stock arrived. There is a marvelous photo on FlickR of an ex-GWR Toad on the Fairford branch (Oxford to Fairford) in the early 1960s that is a real rust bucket.

RCH wooden coal wagons were not robust, and were often at their makers being repaired and repainted. Photo's from the 1930's show relatively clean wagons (even at the colliery) with the odd newly painted and even rarer filthy wagon in a rake. Add the usual mix of 5, 7 or 8 planked wagons and it becomes visually interesting. Really filthy wagons were to be found in industrial yards (collieries, iron and steel works, coke works) for internal working. They were often non-RCH designs that were not allowed outside of the site.

Nigel

Last edited on Sat Apr 25th, 2015 05:45 am by BCDR

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G`day Nigel,

Your observations regarding detail are tremendous. I`ve been just taking a stab at weathering by comparison.

:hmm  more research required me thinks?????

:cheers  Gormo

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G`day Folks,

I have recently been converting a crane and details of same can be found here.

http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=13302&forum_id=150

The crane project actually blew out into a full break down train project and part of that project is converting an old wagon / coach into a Mess van.

I thought it may be better to cover the Mess van project here because it is literally, New Life for an Old Wagon.

So here we go. The coach in question is this one shown below. An old Piko product that is free running however at the moment, not suitable for a British layout.



The task at hand requires removal of the end verandahs and steps, trimming the roof to suit the length of the coach, covering up some windows with timber panelling, timber panelling on the ends of the coach,creating side fitted sliding doors, fitting tension lock couplings ....etc. etc....So plenty to do to bring about a transformation.

First stage is to remove the metal ends and steps and save the buffers. There are plastic lugs/ rivets holding them in place.





Next stage is to remove the plastic verandahs. I just butt them up to the face of the face plate sander and grind 98% of it away and then go more carefully with hand tools. I also need to work the back ends of the coach to remove any obstacles sticking up. I need a flat surface to stick on my panelling.



The panelling is made from greeting card, Christmas card actually, and is marked out and scored accordingly to achieve the timber look.



For the panelling to be fitted some of the rivet detail has to be removed to give a flat surface. I`m also relocating doors so here is a rough cut version below.



The roof has been cut down from an identical test coach and some of the roof vents have been removed also. The panels are being cut out an fixed into position. One set of sliding doors with bracing have been fitted.



Now the end panels are fitted





And a small panel next to the window in the door.



So that`s where we are at end of play today. This wagon certainly will have a lot of artistic licence, however from the prototype wagons I`ve seen, they are a mixture of stock that has been turned over to a new role or stock that has been converted for their new role of Mess van. So I`m not too worried about getting it exactly right, just a close resemblance will do. The fun of it is to create something unique with even a fabricated history to go with it.

More as it happens

:cheers  Gormo


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G`day Folks,

A little more was completed today. It`s starting to get cold out in the shed. Winter is on it`s way.

Well here`s this afternoon`s offering.

All the panels are on and some additional trim. The wagon has two different side profiles. Here is side A



And here is side B



The idea here, as mentioned earlier, is that this is a modified coach turned over to special purpose. So therefore the lack of balance or symmetry.

A piece of card has been added to the bottom of the end walls for buffer mounting. That`s probably the next job.???



Here it is in it`s intended position in the break down train.



I also want to add what I would call a running board, not sure of the correct term.???? In other words, a full length step like you get on brake vans, mounted at axle height. I need some right angled material for this purpose, so I`ve used a method I discovered by accident some time ago when restoring a broken loco body. The method is to use card or paper, then let Super glue spread over the surface. The card or paper absorbs the Super Glue and then the card or paper dries like plastic.

I`ve tried a length of card, scored down it`s length and bent to shape. It`s drying at the moment, so we`ll see how it goes. You can see below it`s not dry yet.



I know this build looks a bit patchy at the moment, however when the wagon is painted all the one colour, I think it will look OK......probably a little rustic.??

More as it happens.

:cheers  Gormo

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A quick update folks,

The Super glue trick with the card to form an angle failed. I think one side ( shiny side ) of the card prevents the glue from penetrating the whole thickness..........result!!!!.....chuck it in the bin!!!

I will visit my local model shop and get some plastic angle.

:cheers  Gormo

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G`day Folks,

The next stage for the wagon is the spray booth. I`ve gone with GW Brown for this one.

Here are some pics of it still wet.......it`s good to see the end of the White look.

An end



The side with extra windows





And the side with fewer windows.



The under carriage will be painted Black. Handrails have to be made and fitted to the doors. I still have to get my plastic profiles to do the running board as mentioned in a previous post. The roof will be painted White.

Plenty to do, so more updates as it happens.

:cheers  Gormo

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That is looking great

REgards...Alan

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Thanks Alan,

It`s coming along nicely so far........fingers crossed. It will slowly come to life as the detail goes on.

:cheers  Gormo

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Great transformation Gormo , you could never tell its origins looking at it now

Cheers

   Matt

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Thanks Matt,

It`s interesting to see what can be done with one Christmas card.......that`s all that has been used.

Anyway.....here`s some more pics.

The roof has been painted, chassis and buffers as well, steps have been added and also transfers and the glazing has gone back in.



The opposite side





And an end.



Well folks......it just needs couplings added and some hand rails for the doors and of course it`s too clean!!!!......so some weathering to make it look used.

:cheers  Gormo


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Looking good Gormo.

How did you make the step in the end, did you have to buy plastic angle?

Ed

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Nah Ed,
You know me.....too tight to go out and buy something!!:mutley:mutley:mutley

I have some old Tyco incomplete building kits that were given to me by the same person who gave me the crane. They are American farm buildings and some houses. One of them is supposed to be a partially built house with timber framing exposed. I butchered the framing to act as supports for the steps and also there were some other parts resembling planks of wood which became the actual steps.

Once these items are painted to match, the eye is deceived into thinking they are original to the wagon.
( hopefully???? )

:cheers  Gormo

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Recycling, brilliant :thumbs


Ed

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Good job Gormo. :thumbs 

Always nice to have a piece, (in your case, another piece) of rollingstock that is of your own doing, gracing the layout.

Cheers, Gary.

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Thats a very nice job Gorbo

REgards...Alan

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Sapperjethro wrote: Thats a very nice job Gorbo



Who's he? :mutley:mutley:mutley

Sapperjethro
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Sorry I mean Gormo...:brickwall

REgards...Alan

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Thanks Gary and the Alans,

I`ve got my converting eye on some other bits and pieces now, but it`s nothing definite yet. But yes Gary it is nice to have something you`ve created, as you would well know.

Thanks Alan ( Spurno ) No.1 Spell Checker:pathead.....that incident reminds me of my school days during the late 50`s and early 60`s. The Japanese were starting to release their monster movies, one of which was Gorgo....so my mates at school gave me a new nickname.....Gorgo.!!!
These days though, all we have to do is hit the wrong key on the keyboard, for some interesting combinations.

:mutley:mutley:mutley

:cheers  Gormo

Last edited on Sun May 17th, 2015 03:31 am by gormo

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 Its that productive tixt that dis fro my overt tim  ( sorry interpretation for Gormo ...Its the predictive text that does my head in..):roll:

Last edited on Sun May 17th, 2015 11:52 pm by

gormo
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:hmm:hmm:hmm:hmm:hmm:hmm:hmm:hmm

Dunno !!!!

:cheers  Gormo

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Hi Gormo,

Found the pics of the mainline CO-OP wagon that got the "treatment". Typical activity on small branch line station/halt sidings with one local coal merchant. Coal was bagged in the wagon, loaded straight onto the delivery lorry. Weathering powders only, matte varnish finish. Needs a P number and white paint on the RHS diagonal bracing as it's also an end discharger. If it was a London coal merchant the upper wooden plank above the door would have been hinged on one side (and folded up out of the way) to allow easy access. I've never seen that modeled.

Nigel






Last edited on Tue May 19th, 2015 02:05 am by BCDR

gormo
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Really Nice Job Nigel,
That`s a miniature work of art!!!!
I love the extra detail and the finish. You see, to my eye .....that is absolutely spot on!!!
Brilliant  :thumbs:thumbs:thumbs:thumbs:thumbs
How did you do the drop down door????

:cheers  Gormo

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Excellent job, but my question is how did they lift the scales into the wagon?

REgards Alan

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Hi Alan,

Brute strength, slid from the lorry bed into the wagon at an angle. London merchants did not have this problem of course. Which begs the question - how do you start bagging and weighing with a full wagon? 

Nigel

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Hi Gormo,

Fine saw blade in a scalpel holder and a lot of patience keeping it exactly vetrical and horizontal - that plastic is thick.  Non-working, easy enough to have a working one using styrene sheet cut to plank height/width. This wagon is part of a cameo of 3 with a flat-bed lorry and coal sacks. Mainline CO-OP wagons only came with one number, using P numbers allows some differences.

Nigel



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Bob's been talking about PO wagons and I've just noticed this has become un-stickied. (is that a word?).




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Do you want it re-stickied, Ed?

Ed
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Hi Max

Up to Gormo and everyone else, but I thought it a useful one to have at the top, like posting pictures.


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Check it now, Ed.

It looks like it's at the top.

Cheers

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:thumbs

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G'day Folks,
It doesn't bother me whether this topic is stickied or unstickied.
I leave it up to the majority or the moderators discretion.
I'm happy to go with the flow.
Cheers
Gormo

Last edited on Fri Jul 10th, 2015 01:57 pm by gormo

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Hi Gormo
Thanks for the interesting beginners intro to weathering. I noticed you mentioned changing the front coupling on a Smokey Joe. I have just bought a used one missing the said coupling and would appreciate any tips about how to fix a replacement as they were moulded as part of the chasis. I realise this should probably be the topic of a new thread and I'd happily move it but just thought it might be worth asking you as you've been there recently.
Thanks
Ray

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G`day Ray,

Yes I did the conversion a little while back and not sure where I posted it now?.....no bother...I have some pics.

I must say that this is not the prettiest way of doing it, but it works fine. The first thing to do is study the area carefully and work out what goes and what stays.
 At the front of the loco I sliced off most of the moulded coupling.....enough so that from a side view it would look like it was never there. I then took a small Bachmann coupling and trimmed each side of it`s retaining plate so that it would fit into the recess under the buffer beam. I drilled a suitable size hole for the retaining screw. From memory the height of the coupling was good, however if it sits too high you can use a small washer or two as spacers. The height of the coupling is important and should be checked against some of your rolling stock to make sure you`ve got it right.



 This is a small coupling compared to the original, however it still looks big on a small loco like Smokey Joe. I do feel though that it improves the look of the thing dramatically.



The rear coupling was a similar exercise although I think a little easier. Again slice off the redundant moulded coupling. Once again I have trimmed the retaining plate off from each side of the Bachmann coupling. Drilled a suitable hole for the retaining screw and fitted the trimmed down coupling. Also once again check the height carefully and adjust with washers if necessary. You may note that the coupling is butted up to the plastic casing behind the screw. This stops the coupling pivoting on the screw. Normally the retaining plate that was trimmed off would do that job.





Here we have it completed......tested and working. 



Once the original couplings are gone, the Bachmanns fit up underneath pretty much at the same height as the originals.....give or take a washer or two.!!!

A quick tip!!!......old audio cassettes are a good source of small screws. Before you toss `em out, take the screws out.!!!

 Something different of note too is the silver buffer closest in the above pic. This is a replacement made from a flat head nail of suitable size. The top of the flat head was filed to create a key for solder. The nail head was then heated with the soldering iron until solder would flow quite easily. When soldering the nail head, it is quite easy to form a small dome with the solder. When it cools you can give it a rub with some fine paper to match it more closely to it`s neighbour. Then drill a hole so that it fits snugly into position. Oh....also you have to trim the nail to length to suit. Glue it into position if you wish.

So there you are Ray......the hardest thing to do is the initial step of hacking off the moulded coupling.



:cheers  Gormo

Last edited on Thu Aug 20th, 2015 03:16 pm by gormo

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Brilliant Gormo
Thanks so much for the effort to bring out those older pics of the Smokey Joe conversion. The nail tip is a great make do fix too! Sadly all my cassettes are long gone in a previous international move!
This is a wonderful topic with some great pics and video how to's - thanks so much.
Ray

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I am liking that Nail tip, I have some missing buffers and being tight always like a cheap solution, I had thought that maybe a nail might work so its nice to see it put into practice.

Off to look at my nail selection for suitable candidates.....

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No worries Andy,
If you need more detail on the method.......just post it......and I`ll sort something out.

:cheers  Gormo

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Hmmm i was watching the Granddaughter the other day with a craft set she had been bought....Threading beads..making bracelets..cheap as chips in all different sizes and cylindrical as well as round ones. wonder if some of those little cylinders could be used with the nail to make up different  buffers ? must look out a mixed pack next:hmm time I'm at that big craft store  ...:It's a no no No !! I'm not pinching the GD's....Although   :mutley

Cheers

  Matt

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OK Matt,
As long as the grandaughters stocks are safe.
:cheers  Gormo

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More information on your method would be useful if you have the time to post it.

Thanks

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OK Andy,
Give me a couple of days......it`s late here now and tomorrow is tied up all day.
:cheers  Gormo

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OK Folks......here we go!!

As per a request from Andy re more detail on making a buffer from a flat head nail.

Well the only rolling stock I have at the moment that needs a new buffer is this brake van below. I got it cheap as is and it was intended to be a project of some sort...???
As you can see...it needs a buffer.



The first step is to find a flat head nail with the appropriate size head or as near as possible.







The next step is to prepare the head to accept solder. The head has to be filed or grinded by what ever method you have available. If you use a file it`s best to clamp the nail into a vice. If using power equipment, make sure you read and understand all the safety requirements and use safety glasses.



What you need to achieve is a clean, flat surface that will be a good key for the solder.



The next stage is to let your soldering iron heat up completely. You can`t attempt this with a luke warm iron. The nail needs to be pre-heated before bringing solder to it.....more of that below.
Now you need to be able to secure the nail in an upright position either in a vice or clamp of some description. I use some helping hands which in turn are secured in a portable vice. Doesn`t matter what you use as long as the nail is held securely.



I have an old 40 Watt soldering iron and I use 60/40 tin/lead solder.



Now the method is shown in a video below. I basically heat the nail head for about ten seconds and then I bring the solder to the nail as you will see below.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TDMZUeuy1T8



If you continue adding solder, using the above method, you can finish up with almost a half sphere shape on the nail head. So the trick is to add a small amount to start with, you can always build it up if you need to just by repeating the process. Practice makes perfect and nails are cheap.

Now I like to clean up the new rounded head with either fine Wet & Dry paper or on my bench grinder which has a buffing attachment. Whatever you have is fine. I imagine steel wool would work? You just need to get the silver shine off the solder and create a good key for painting.

You can see now the head has a dull finish and the profile is pretty good.





The next stage now is to drill a hole in the buffer beam that will accept the nail shaft. I would suggest testing on some scrap first before actually drilling the wagon, just to make sure all is good.



Then the nail shaft has to be trimmed to suit the site, allowing enough shaft to enter the buffer beam for a snug fit.



Once you`re happy with the fit and length etc.....Superglue the buffer in place. Check the horizontal and vertical planes for alignment and adjust quickly before the glue sets.















For this repair on this wagon I think the buffer would look better with a collar near the buffer beam.
So I used a thin strip of black electrical tape.



The electrical tape strip was the wrapped around the nail shaft next to the buffer beam and secured with a drop of Superglue just in case.



The next step was to use what I call the great equalizer or hider of mistakes.......Matt Black paint!!!

Yes folks....paint the buffer to match it`s neighbours and in effect blend it in.

So here it is using the three foot rule.....it`s the one nearest to us.



And from above.....you can see it`s not a perfect match....but really that`s my fault. I could have done a better job on the collar.



And to finish off.



So folks...I hope that makes sense.

I am happy to answer any queeries......feel free to fire away!!!

:cheers  Gormo





Campaman
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Very good thanks for that, its the addition of the solder that I hadn't thought of, to be honest i think if I was doing this I would look for some form of plastic tube for the collar and probably then remove the other buffer and make two new ones so they match, then I could always use the removed one with a pin inserted into the shank as a repair for another wagon.

Great stuff.

:doublethumb


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G`day Andy,

Yes I`m sure the collar could be improved by your suggestion. The buffer I repaired on Smokey Joe however had the collar left intact, so it was just a matter of drilling out the collar to receive the nail.
I guess each repair will be slightly different. I agree with your idea of creating at least two buffers at one end.....it would be more consistent.
Mind you, once these repairs are painted up, they are very hard to pick. Macro photography shows all the flaws unfortunately, however if we use the three foot rule the repairs look fine..:mutley

:cheers  Gormo

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Hi Gormo,

A good solution to a common breakage. I think I could even follow that. As you say, the three foot rule would be good enough for me as well. Anybody that lowers their head for closer inspection gets slapped around the napper with a bit of flexi track.;-)

Cheers

Toto

gormo
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"Anybody that lowers their head for closer inspection gets slapped around the napper with a bit of flexi track.;-)"

G`day Toto.......I think that is a good way to deal with prying eyes.....I`ll keep that in mind.

:cheers Gormo

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Crikey!!!!.....pic of the week....thanks Alan.
:cheers  Gormo

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Beautiful crystal clear photo Brian.It gets harder to pick one every week.:thumbs

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Better than the original, I personally would have done them both...Great job

Thank's for showing us

REgards...Alan

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Yes Alan,
I agree....do the two of them.
Normally I would take a more thorough approach, however I don`t have a lot of love for this wagon, and it really was a quick fix just for the purpose of the demo....so there you are.??...that`s my story and I`m sticking to it.!!!:mutley:mutley:mutley:mutley

It shows the possibilities though if more time and care is taken.:hmm

:cheers  Gormo




                 

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