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allan downes
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Staying with the dark stone and weird chimneys theme we're off on another adventure - no plan, no pictures, just a flexible idea inspired by a scene at Castle Coombe - bridge, water, house - what more would you want?!

Allan



 



 



 



 


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Your speed of construction never fails to astound me. I started a round house 12 months ago and still have not cut it all out.
Stephen

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OUTSTANDING it even looks real incomplete:doublethumb

Petermac
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The stonework is incredible Allan. :thumbs

As both Stephen and Ian have said, the rate at which you build these things is mind boggling.  I suppose when it used to be your living, time was money .............................:roll::roll::roll::roll:

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Wow Alan how do you make the windows and doors?

allan downes
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Petermac wrote: The stonework is incredible Allan. :thumbsAs both Stephen and Ian have said, the rate at which you build these things is mind boggling.  I suppose when it used to be your living, time was money .............................:roll::roll::roll::roll:
Thanks Peter.

The Immingham tummy bug returned to day and headed straight for me, so only a couple of hours this afternoon but enough to get the main roofs tiled out.

Yes, time was money, the customer's money so you had to shift stuff pretty quick

One client once asked if I could build him a layout to Pendon standards and I said not at what you're paying me !

Then I asked him to consider that it took Roye England 2 years to build just one cottage and if I charged you just £1 an hour at that speed could you afford it?

He never mentioned Pendon again...

Anyway,  a few pics.

Allan.

 



 



 



 



 



 

Alan-2
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Love your attention to detail and nothing but the best.....

Superb as always Sir.

Gary
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Beautiful work (as always) Allan. The doors and windows are superb as well. Could you tell me which supplier you use, or are they your handy work ?

Cheers, Gary.

allan downes
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Gary wrote: Beautiful work (as always) Allan. The doors and windows are superb as well. Could you tell me which supplier you use, or are they your handy work ?

Cheers, Gary.


Thanks for that Gary, kind words always appreciated.

The windows and doors are brass etched from Scalelink, tel:01747 811817,  and their catologue is every model makers dream - If they haven't got it, nor has anyone else! - working Norfolk door catches ? - behave!!!!

However, I do bulk them up with planted outer frames cut from Evergreen 40/60 thou strip.

When you glue the glazing strip in place just glue around the edges only otherwise you'll have glue spilling out everywhere!

Allan

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Thanks Allan, they do look excellent. I have recently bought some windows from York Model Making and I'm impressed with these. A tad expensive at the moment with the exchange rate, but as they say, 'beggars can't be choosers' !!

Cheers, Gary.

allan downes
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All done, just a little haunching around the base of the stacks then the bridge and whatever follows that.

Allan



 



 



 



 



 


allan downes
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Right guys, change of direction, was was supposed to be loose scene from Castle Coombe is even looser still as I couldn't capture what I intended in the given area so, project abandoned, totaly freelance setting instead and here's how it's shaping up.

Allan.



 



 



 



 


allan downes
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Made a little more progress today and the end's in sight.

Allan.



 



 



 



 


Petermac
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What more can we say Allan - simply wonderful. :thumbs:thumbs

How did you do the rotten boarding under the crane chute - cardboard ?

allan downes
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Petermac wrote: What more can we say Allan - simply wonderful. :thumbs:thumbs

How did you do the rotten boarding under the crane chute - cardboard ?


Thank you Peter.

Rotten Boarding - sooooo simple!

Right, this only takes three minutes at the very outside, but it only works on styrene.

Brush the boarding down in even downward strokes with Colron Georgian Oak Wood Dye, then using an old 1inch household paint brush, keep dragging it downwards until it picks up on the dye where the more you drag it, the more it picks up and the more it gets weathered.

But try it on a scrap piece of styrene first.

Cheers.

Allan.

Last edited on Fri Feb 14th, 2014 11:52 pm by allan downes

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It really is superb, Allan.  :thumbs

I'm interested in the roof treatment.  It looks kind of yellow.

What "materials" would the roof be made of?

allan downes
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MaxSouthOz wrote: It really is superb, Allan.  :thumbs

I'm interested in the roof treatment.  It looks kind of yellow.

What "materials" would the roof be made of?

Than you.


Individual card tiles, stippled with Colron Antique Pine Wood Dye and Pollyfilla powder and sealed in with a 50/50 mix of PVA and water.

When dry, the texture is high lighted by dust coating up and under the tile edges with matt black acrylic.

Allan.

Here's a close up.

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Sorry.  I wasn't clear, Allan.

What is the material used in the prototype?

I've not noticed a roof like that before.

allan downes
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MaxSouthOz wrote: Sorry.  I wasn't clear, Allan.

What is the material used in the prototype?

I've not noticed a roof like that before.

Well Max, they are supposed to be stone tiles, as you see in the Cotswolds, which looked something like it when I used Colron English light Oak as the base colour and as can be seen on the mill scene.

However, when I built Tintagel Post Office, I ran out of English Light Oak and used Antique Pine instead - which turned out red, and stone tiles were never that colour!

But, and as it's so often said in the parallel universe of railway modelling, if it looks right, it is!

Allan.

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Thanks, Allan.  I'll keep a look out for the stone tiles next time Escape to the Country goes to the Cotswolds.  :cool:

allan downes
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Stone tiles?


Petermac
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Thanks for the painting details for the rotten boarding Allan - it was more the board ends that I wondered about. :roll:  You've reproduced perfectly the "comb-like" rotten ends - surely that isn't done with just paint ..........:shock::shock::shock:

Normally, my buildings look reasonable until I grab my paintbrush after which, they tend to look like some primary school kids' offering ...........all over-bright colours, layed on far too thickly.  The "subtle shading" which gives that natural look seems to avoid me completely ..............:cry::cry::cry:

allan downes
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Petermac wrote: Thanks for the painting details for the rotten boarding Allan - it was more the board ends that I wondered about. :roll:  You've reproduced perfectly the "comb-like" rotten ends - surely that isn't done with just paint ..........:shock::shock::shock:

Normally, my buildings look reasonable until I grab my paintbrush after which, they tend to look like some primary school kids' offering ...........all over-bright colours, layed on far too thickly.  The "subtle shading" which gives that natural look seems to avoid me completely ..............:cry::cry::cry:


Hi Peter.

It's not that often I use paint, well not in the strictest sense as I mainly use wood dyes on buildings and where I might use paint - doors, windows, woodwork etc - then I use it sparingly and well thinned out. Bright colours are too 'sudden', too in your face, and while they might work in the real world they light up a model like a neon light - "Hey, I'm a building with blinding white windows and fire engine red doors!!" 

Sutlety is the name of the game when painting buildings - and always use matt collours if you can - if you cant get the colour you want in matt,  then flatten it by mixing in talcum powder.

Oh, the the rotten boarding is distressed by slicing the ends up with a Stanley Knife - but here's another trick that works quite well - wood graining.

For this I draw a jewellers saw hard down the styrene boarding/strips which 'gouges' a very convincing grain effect into the plastic surface, then coulour this with wood dye, dry brush a little paint over the dye, as I have done on the model shown, and it looks pretty convincing - and it doesn't take all day to achieve it, just a few minutes. 

Allan.

allan downes
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Made fair progress today, buildings based, walling and steps finished, roofes weathered and canal basin second coated with PVA and almost ready for stippling.

Allan



 



 



 



 



 


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It looks bliddy marvellous with the green on it, Allan.  I like the way the roof timbers have sagged over the years under the weight of the tiles.  :thumbs

allan downes
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MaxSouthOz wrote: It looks bliddy marvellous with the green on it, Allan.  I like the way the roof timbers have sagged over the years under the weight of the tiles.  :thumbs


Yeh Max, I used my waistline as a template!

Allan.

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At the risk of repeating myself, that's awesome Allan. :doublethumb

So much detail to look at.  It's actually better than the Cotswolds because there aren't any crowds of tourists with cameras constantly clicking away. :thumbs:thumbs

allan downes
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Talking of crowds Peter, I was outside in the front garden taking some pics when a lady stopped and asked  "I like that, is it made out of Leggo?"!!!

"No" I said "fire cement"

"Huh" she said looking down down at her nose  "I only asked"!

Cheers.

Allan.

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:mutley:mutley:mutley:mutley

allan downes
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Almost there! drainpipes an stuff, then whatever takes my fancy - great being retired, do it the way you want and not the way others don't want you to !

Allan.



 



 



 



 



 



 



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Great work again Allan,i don't know whether to look at them or move into them. :hmm:doublethumb:doublethumb:doublethumb

allan downes
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Thanks Alan.

Arlington Row next -Bidbury, Cotswolds - or as much of them as I can fit into a given area.

Arlington row is supposed to be a 1,000 years old, and they look it, so somehow I've got to make the model look a 1,000 years old too!

Allan.

This is they.


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Brilliant work Allan.  What's the process in creating the water?

Terry

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col.stephens wrote: Brilliant work Allan.  What's the process in creating the water?

Terry


Thanks Terry.

Paint the bed black/dark green, then cover in a thickish coat of neat PVA then as it starts to skin over, stipple it with a one inch household paint brush then when dry repeat untill you get enough build up after which it will dry out transparant  and finish with a coat of clear gloss varnish.

The water seen here was treated twice - the more coats, the heavier the 'flow'

Allan.

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allan downes wrote: Arlington row is supposed to be a 1,000 years old, and they look it, so somehow I've got to make the model look a 1,000 years old too!

Allan.

This is they.




That's going to be some retirement then....! :mutley:mutley:mutley

Cheers, Gary.

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Hi Alan,

Superb build. How long on average does it take you to complete one of your typical builds ?

They all look like a life times work to me but you seem to be able to pop these out at will. What a gift.

Cheers

Toto

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toto wrote: Hi Alan,

Superb build. How long on average does it take you to complete one of your typical builds ?

They all look like a life times work to me but you seem to be able to pop these out at will. What a gift.

Cheers

Toto


Hi Toto.

I don't put in anywhere near the hours I used to these days - probably 6 hours a day at most  and even then not every day- and when I was going at it full time a scene like those shown here would have been ready for collection in around 3 days.

What made this possible was not having to wait days, sometimes weeks, for materials where I always had plenty of everything in stock - I was literally surrounded by plastic ans cardboard !! - and of course, familiararity with the subject - sizes, leading dimensions, architectural disciplines  etc, and an uncontrollable immagination!

Do something, anything, 12 hours a day, 7 days a week, and you end up being able to do it blindfolded - it was as much use as it was skill.

As for it being clever I would have said it was more of a gift as you say where I didn't have to learn it, it just kind of happened and that's not the same thing -  give me a loco kit and I'll show you what I mean - a total disaster !

Allan.

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Hi Allan,

Thanks for the reply. I think I would rather be able to do the buildings and architecture side of things rather than the loco's.

There are plenty of acceptable loco's available of the shelf but the same cannot be said for buildings and where they are, not to anywhere near this quality. Not on the same planet.

3 days.......astounding.

Keep them coming...... A nice run down maintenance shed with outside crane gantry hoist built into the structure of the building would be nice......not that I'm suggesting anything of course ;-)...... Way down your to do list I would imagine.

Thanks for posting these wonderful structures in the first place.

Cheers

toto

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Another lovely build Alan.
You are doing your bit for Ye Old England architecture.
I see Toto is steering you in an industrial direction!
Now a model of the first LNWR mechanical coal hoist circa 1915 would be a thing of beauty?
Many thanks for your building tips and photo,s.
Derek.

allan downes
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[color=#008833 abp="452"]shunter1 wrote: Another lovely build Alan.You are doing your bit for Ye Old England architecture.I see Toto is steering you in an industrial direction!Now a model of the first LNWR mechanical coal hoist circa 1915 would be a thing of beauty?Many thanks for your building tips and photo,s.Derek.
 Yes, I shall be having words with Toto later !!

However, I do just happen to have a pic of a coaler - not LNWR I'm affraid, but a coaler nonetheless! - and although I have put it up before, I can put it up again if you so wish, just give me the word - any excuse to put pics up !

Allan.

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Oops:pedal

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:shock:Sorry Toto,I seem to have put you under Alan's spotlight.

Hi Alan, I would love to see your coal hoist model:).

Thanks,

Derek.

allan downes
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One coal hoist model for the use of.

Last edited on Wed Feb 19th, 2014 05:01 pm by allan downes

allan downes
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The sun came out this morning so I took a couple of 'sunshine shots' on top of the hedge!

Allan.



 





 



 



 


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:)Lovely scenic buildings and surronds Alan,

One feels like casting a fishing fly into that stream.

Many thanks for the Coal Tower photo as well.:).

regards,

Derek.

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shunter1 wrote:
.....One feels like casting a fishing fly into that stream.




All you'll come up with Derek is hairs that came out of the paint brush as I was stippling the glue !

Pleased you liked the coaler, it was Tony Wright who took the picture and his son, Tom, photoshopped it smack bang in the middle of the Severn Valley preservation society's MPD  - then did the same with my ash plant !

Allan.


                 

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