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John's Workbench - On Members Workbenches. - More Practical Help - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Fri Oct 25th, 2013 04:03 pm
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Brossard
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These:  http://www.finescale.org.uk/index.php?route=product/category&path=346_347_348

They thread onto the rail and are glued to the timbers.  US/CDN practice is to use spikes.  I have a gabazillion.

John



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 Posted: Fri Oct 25th, 2013 04:10 pm
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shunter1
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I hope you have a lot of patience John.
Chaired turnouts do look the business though.
Regarding rivets if you are using plastic chairs you won't need them. Glue the chairs to the wooden sleeper's after threading them onto the rail.
I am not sure if some chair brands come with a little locating spigot which would be very handy for predrilled punched sleeper,s.

regards,

Derek.

OOops posts crossed.

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 Posted: Fri Oct 25th, 2013 05:46 pm
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Brossard
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Yes Derek, they do take a lot more effort but, as you say, they look the business.  I have tried them before.

The chaired points with plastic timbers look great, however, I don't think they are strong enough in two places:

1)  At the tie bar and

2)  At the crossing

Some people cheat a bit and use copper clad timbers in strategic places to get additional strength, and that is what I had planned to do.  The problem with this is that you can't put chairs at these locations.

Now, though, instead of copper clad reinforcement, I can use the timber & rivets soldered to the rail.  Using this I can install cosmetic chairs :lol:.  I have seen this done by pushing a half chair against the rail while applying the soldering iron to the rail top.  This softens the chair allowing it to conform to the rail/rivet.

I have both C&L and Exactoscale chairs.  The latter are moulded such that you can use the sprue to push the chairs on the rail.

I do have all (or most anyway - discovered a new one today) of the EMGS gauges for making vees and blades as well as a crossing jig.  I didn't use them for the point build here because I wanted to illustrate things from first principles.

It's going to be an exciting journey.

John

 



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 Posted: Sat Oct 26th, 2013 01:41 am
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Petermac
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An excellent thread John. :thumbs

Apart from the sleeper (tie) spacing being better, to me the main advantage of hand built points is the ability to build exactly what you need rather than trying to make your track fit available geometry.

It doesn't matter how good RTR track laying is - even "finescale", hand built stuff always stands out.  You do however, need patience and that's something I lack by the bucket full !!! :oops::oops::oops:

Gene can build his points in 40 minutes, I can open around 100 Peco boxes in that time (and I won't burn my fingers) .........................:roll::roll::mutley:mutley



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 Posted: Sat Oct 26th, 2013 09:15 am
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Brossard
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You're so right about the flexibilty of hand built track Peter.  Even copper clad points, when painted and ballasted, look finer than Peco code 75 - have a look at the flangeways on a Peco point, they're HUGE!

Of course, copper clad points are also very cheap, although you can buy pre made vees, crossings and blades.

Occasionally I might singe my fingers when soldering, causing me to drop the work but that is different from burning and lasting damage - never happened.

John

 



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 Posted: Sat Oct 26th, 2013 09:33 am
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shunter1
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Use your fingernail tips guys.
No nerves in them so no pain like a horse hoof.
Saves you trimming them as well!

Derek.

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 Posted: Sat Oct 26th, 2013 10:35 am
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Petermac
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shunter1 wrote: Use your fingernail tips guys.
No nerves in them so no pain like a horse hoof.
Saves you trimming them as well!

Derek.


Yes, and your workroom will smell like a dentist's surgery as they burn down......................:shock::shock::mutley:mutley

I may have a go at building one myself John - they do look really good .........:roll:



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 Posted: Sun Oct 27th, 2013 01:02 pm
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Brossard
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I laid the 00 and EM track on the test track, held loosely with pins.  It all looks pretty good and will do what I need for now.  I'll wire it all up another day.

Getting back to the brake, my leetle grey cells have been racing about like mad things and I think I've come up with a solution for those orphan vee hangers.

There is very little room in the underframe so, in a flash of insight, I decided to try them on the center axle unit.  I had to do some surgery here and there and added some brass strip for support but it seems to work:




As usual with these things, the solution caused another problem - with the reservoir - it was a hopeless foul, so I think you can see the saddle I made with some scrap brass.




You can see the center axle unit in place and just fitting.  I may need to remove a bit of material from the saddle to provide full clearance but it all seems good.  I will remove the WM legs from the reservoir, file a flat and glue it to the saddle after everything else is done.

John



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 Posted: Tue Oct 29th, 2013 05:01 pm
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Brossard
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I got the van underframe running today  :Happy  Quite happily as well, so that's a bonus.




The body is in primer grey and will be painted a much nicer grey (TBD).  It looks twisted slightly in the picture - I will have to look at that.




I ended up conceding defeat with the suspension system designed into the kit :brickwall  Instead I just glued the "moving" axle units down, shimming the center one to get the right height.  As it happens, the suspension was a load of unnecessary complication, all I did was give the center axle some side play.

I didn't fully rig the brakes - there's simply no room.  The brake yokes are from the very useful MainlyTrains brake gear etch (several different ones available).

So, I'm relieved that's done - I can get on with the cosmetic stuff now.

John

 

 

 



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 Posted: Wed Oct 30th, 2013 11:43 am
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shunter1
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Well Done John,
That Lanky brake van is coming along nicely.
Sometimes we have to compromise with these kits to preserve our sanity.
Also with EM you are still allowed a little leeway.

regards,

Derek.

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 Posted: Wed Oct 30th, 2013 12:15 pm
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Brossard
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Indeed, my brain usually hurts after a session with kits like this.  Forging ahead today with painting etc.

John



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 Posted: Thu Oct 31st, 2013 02:25 pm
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Brossard
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I got my brake van completed today:Happy




The L&Y painted their brakes black, but a couple of factors influenced me to do mine dark grey.

-  reading an old MRJ article on L&Y brakes (not this one unfortunately), the author confessed to painting his models dark grey because black tends to kill detail.

- my reading also turned up that LMS were slow to repaint their inherited vans so, if they were originally black that would have faded over the years.

Transfers are HMRS Pressfix and yes the M in this picture is damaged, only just noticed it :twisted:.  Unfortunately, the number is a fiction.  It is based on one of only 2 pictures of the van I could find and that is a completed model in L&Y livery.  LMS tended to add a prefix number to their inherited wagons to give them a 6 digit number.  I added 300000 to the L&Y number.  I also didn't know where to put the number.  Normally, LMS brakes had their number at the top in a black panel - I couldn't do that here because of the window.

Couplings are scale head Kadee.

The final step is to weather - that will conceal many sins.

John



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 Posted: Thu Oct 31st, 2013 02:35 pm
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Regards the "M" John the damage just makes it look a more realistic model.Great job.:thumbs



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 Posted: Thu Oct 31st, 2013 02:51 pm
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Brossard
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Thanks Alan.  Being of that sort of mind, I mended it.

John



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 Posted: Thu Oct 31st, 2013 09:48 pm
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Brossard
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I had a chat with a mate of mine who knows about these things and he suggested that it was possible that the van never had a bodyside number.  Certainly the one picture I was able to find of the van in LMS times (Modeller's BackTrack Vol 2 #2) doesn't have a number on the body but does have a solebar plate showing ownership and the number (which is not legible).  So I put my mind to it and, using Powerpoint, created tiny plates (bold font 2.5 if interested).

I have also weathered the van, so I think it can be called finished:







I added a Springside tail lamp.

Hmmm, what will I do next?

John

 



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 Posted: Thu Oct 31st, 2013 10:16 pm
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Build a layout??:mrgreen:



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 Posted: Thu Oct 31st, 2013 10:28 pm
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Brossard
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Oh lord no.  I want to get some more rolling stock and locos in place first.

John



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 Posted: Fri Nov 1st, 2013 02:16 am
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Superb build, superb model ! Very nice finish on the end product.

Cheers, Gary.



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 Posted: Fri Nov 1st, 2013 09:12 am
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shunter1
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very nice John,
A lovely model.
Colours of brake vans are tricky.
Looking at a repainted (LMS)1924 4-wheeled L&Y brake van.
It was painted light grey, probably for photo purposes.
Running number 162786 placed on the lower body panel.Left end under the L of LMS and below the side handrails.
The LMS plate was placed on the solebare beneath the running number 162786.
Although the Lanky kept there plates in a central position on the solebare.
The LMS seemed to have left the tare number in this case 20.8.0. in its original L&Y position.
Looking at an old 6 wheeled brake in L&Y days around 1914
There appears to be a running number placed on the central body panel in line with the bottom of the L and Y letters of the company.
From the photo the brake looks dark grey in colour or of course faded black?
Sorry about all the script.

Derek.

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 Posted: Fri Nov 1st, 2013 09:44 am
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Brossard
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Thanks Gary.

Derek, I think I'll leave well enough alone now.  The other picture I found was of a Jidenco (now Falcon Brassworks) kit in L&Y black livery.  This had the number on the RHS of the van adjacent to the window.  Font was strange:

http://mozzermodels.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=136495705

John



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